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Summary

  1. MPs met at 11.30am for questions to the International Development ministerial team.
  2. The Education Committee took evidence on mental health and the well-being of looked after children.
  3. Then it was PMQs, followed by a statement on EU negotiations.
  4. MPs on the Treasury Committee continued their inquiry on the economic and financial costs and benefits of the UK's EU membership.
  5. The rest of the day in the Commons was taken up with Opposition Day debates.
  6. Peers met at 3pm and began with oral questions, followed by the Immigration Bill.

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge, Kate Whannel and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bates informs the House that the government has sent a letter to local authorities setting out what funding is available. 

    He expresses the hope that transfer arrangements will continue to be a voluntary arrangement between central and local government. 

    There are some amendments left to debate but peers decide to call it a day.

    The House of Lords will return tomorrow at 11:00 GMT for oral questions.

    House of Lords clock
  2. Responsibility for unaccompanied children

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alton agrees to withdraw the amendment but warns he will come back to the issue unless progress has been made.

    Baroness Hamwee now rises to speak to a group of amendments which seeks to ensure that the government will consult with local authorities when transferring responsibility of unaccompanied children. 

    The Local Government Association has expressed concerns that local authorities will be compelled to take on minors "with no clarity on how their support needs will be funded".

    Baroness Hamwee
  3. 'Prime driving force'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bates refrains from tearing up his speech as urged by Lord Forsyth, in part, he says, because the Chief Whip is close by.

    On the amendment he tells peers that the government's "prime driving force" is to provide international humanitarian protection on the basis of need.

  4. 'Throw away the brief'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Forsyth of Drumlean urges the minister to, on this issue, "throw away the brief".

    He recalls his time studying history at university and admits never really understanding how the persecution of the Jews was allowed to continue for so long. 

    Quote Message: In those days there was at least the excuse that people might not know because communications was difficult. We know what is going on there now."
  5. Will the US use the G-word?

    Naomi Grimley, Global affairs correspondent

    It will take a while to find out what exactly happened in the town of Sinjar in northern Iraq. But already the discovery of six mass graves, some of them booby-trapped with bombs, has thrown attention back on to the terrible crimes inflicted on the Yazidi population by so-called Islamic State (IS).

    One of the graves contains the bodies of about 80 women thought to be too old to serve as sex slaves.

    Now there's growing speculation that the US may soon start calling these and other crimes against the Yazidis genocide. There have also been calls in the UK for Prime Minister David Cameron to use the term to describe the killing of minorities by IS.

    Read more

    Kurdish forces have discovered several burial sites in Sinjar, the victims suspected to belong to Iraq's Yazidi community
    Image caption: Kurdish forces have discovered several burial sites in Sinjar, the victims suspected to belong to Iraq's Yazidi community
  6. 'Not about a free for all'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Baroness Cox has put her name to the amendment and explains that it is not about "a free for all" as was "mistakenly implemented" in Germany. 

    Nor, she says, is it about quotas and "the unseemly bidding war" about how many people each country should take.

    She tells peers that the amendment focuses on "a vulnerable group of people being targeted now" and argues that their claims should be prioritised.

    There has been debate about whether the so-called Islamic State group's persecution of the Yazidis, a religious minority in Iraq qualifies as genocide. 

    Baroness Cox
  7. Asylum for genocide victims

    Immigraiton Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alton of Liverpool's amendment 234A states that asylum shall be granted to those who belongs to a national, ethical, racial or religious group which is a victim of genocide.

    Many suffer, he says, but this is about those who have been singled out.

  8. 'Speaking of love' at committee stage

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Teverson

    Lib Dem Lord Teverson speaks in support of an amendment which would reduce the minimum income threshold for sponsoring a non-EEA (European Economic Area) partner to settle in the UK.

    Lord Teverson says that the nature of a globalised world means that people of different nationalities will sometimes fall in love and their right to a family life should be sacrosanct.

    Minister Lord Bates thanks Lord Teverson for "raising our sights on day four of the committee stage of the Immigration Bill by speaking of love". 

    "It sets the mind wandering" he says.

    However on the amendment he is unmoved arguing that family life should not be established at the taxpayers' expense.

  9. 'Perverse incentives'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates worries that extending the criteria could create "perverse incentives" for refugees to make the dangerous journey to Europe. 

    Lord Kennedy of Southwark withdraws his amendment but hints he will return to the issue at a later stage.

  10. 'A very unwise step'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Green of Deddington

    Crossbench peer Lord Green of Deddington warns that extending the criteria for family reunions could mean "a potential enormous number of relatives".

    He notes that in the last ten years 87,000 people had, "to our credit", been granted humanitarian protection in Britain.

    He calculates that if each of those people had four or five relatives "we would be admitting half a million people".

    This, he concludes, would be "a very unwise step".

  11. Breaking up families 'seems like madness'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Bishop of Norwich

    The Bishop of Norwich tells peers that whilst It may seem an "organisational necessity" to break up family units for those within a family "it seems like madness".

    He suggests that the rise in net migration figures are not the fault of family reunions.

  12. Debate on Immigration Bill resumes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    With the dinner break business concluded, peers return to the Immigration Bill and to amendment 231.

    Labour's amendment calls for a review into the rules relating to refugees reuniting with family members.

    The review would have to look at options for allowing British citizens to sponsor close family members recognised as refugees.

    The review would also examine options for extending the criteria for family reunion to include children, grandchildren, parents, grandparents, spouses, partners or siblings. 

    House of Lords
  13. 'Most backdated claims' awarded for one month or less

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Freud sets out two factors which contributed to the government's decision to change the regulations.

    Firstly he says the government wanted to achieve equality among those in receipt of working age benefits.

    Secondly, he says their data show that more than two thirds of backdated claims are awarded for one month or less. 

  14. 'Why the rush?'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Sherlock shares the concerns of Lord Kirkwood, who tabled the motion of regret.  

    She says she understands that the move is due to the government wanting housing benefit to be aligned with universal credit.

    "But why the rush?" she asks, given that full roll-out of universal credit could be "years away". 

    Baroness SHerlock
  15. Vulnerable people 'at risk of homelessness'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Low of Dalston rises to support the motion on the grounds that limiting backdated payments puts vulnerable people at risk of eviction at risk of homelessness.

    He says he believes it should be possible for payments to be backdated to three months, rather than the one month proposed by the new regulations. 

    Lord Low
  16. Dinner break business begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alton thanks the minister for responding in his usual "patient and courteous way" and withdraws his amendment.

    Debate on the Immigration Bill is paused for the dinner break business, which today is a regret motion on the Housing Benefit (Abolition of the Family Premium and Date of Claim Amendment) Regulations.

    The motion raises two concerns - firstly that not enough information has been provided on the regulation, and secondly that those in receipt of housing benefit will be adversely affected by the regulations.

    The motion reduces the period for which working age housing benefit claims can be backdated. 

  17. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Paul Beresford calls the standard of dental health in the UK "sad and a disgrace" and says it has been so for decades.

    Health Minister Alistair Burt says says many of the issues raised by the debate are "depressingly familiar" but the government takes dental health issues seriously.

    And with that the House adjourns for the night. MPs return at 9:30am tomorrow for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs questions.

  18. There will be 'no gap in the support provided'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates speaks to a number of government amendments which he says will allow local authorities to give support to care leavers without leave to remain.

    This, he says, will ensure that there will be "no gap in the support provided".

    He seeks to assure peers that the government has listened to concerns and acted accordingly.

    He further promises to meet with peers still concerned by the bill's provisions.

    Lord Bates
  19. 'Are we really trying to generate terrorists?'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Judd

    Lord Judd puts a number of questions to the House: "What are we doing with this younger genreation? Are we actually trying to generate mental illness?  Are we really trying to generate recruits for terrorists or gangs?"

    These children, he tells peers, will go somewhere - "they will either be healthy citizens or deeply damaged youngsters."

  20. 'Vulnerability cannot be magicked away'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Lister supports the amendment, telling peers that vulnerability of care leavers "cannot be magicked away by constant referral to this group of people as adult migrants".

    She makes the point that "the vulnerability recognised at 17 years 11 months does not evaporate overnight on their 18th birthday".