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Summary

  1. MPs met at 11.30am for questions to the Business ministerial team.
  2. There were two urgent questions: the first on the EU negotiations, from Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn; and the second on the Zika virus.
  3. The main business of the day was second reading of the Enterprise Bill.
  4. MPs also debated a motion on two non-MPs becoming members of the House of Commons Commission.
  5. Peers met at 2.30pm and after questions, considered a series of bills including committee stage of the Access to Palliative Care Bill.
  6. They also discussed Commons amendments to the Charities (Protection and Social Investment) Bill and the Childcare Bill.
  7. The Home Affairs Committee heard evidence on countering extremism and the migration crisis.

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge, Kate Whannel and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons has adjourned for the night.

    MPs return at 11:30 tomorrow for International Development questions, followed by Prime Minister's Questions at noon.

    The Prime Minister is also expected to make a statement on the draft EU renegotiation deal released today.

  2. 'Real progress' on real-time credit data sharing

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Economic Secretary to the Treasury Harriett Baldwin says part of her job is ensuring that financial services work for consumers.

    She says there is "nothing" stopping lending firms from sharing their data on customers in real-time with each other. She says that there has been "real progress" among what she refers to as "high volume" lenders in sharing data in real-time, 90% of whom do so.

  3. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs move to the adjournment debate, led by Islwyn Labour MP Chris Evans.

    It is on the subject of real-time credit scoring. Real-time scoring would enable people's credit scores to be shared between lenders more quickly, which could stop borrowers being able to pay off one payday loan with another payday loan.

    Chris Evans says that only a database with "real-time" information can protect consumers.

    Chris Evans
  4. Motion passes

    House of Commons Commission motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After a short speech by the Deputy Leader of the House Therese Coffey, the shadow leader of the house Chris Bryant and the SNP's commons business spokesperson Pete Wishart join in welcoming the two new members of the Commission.

    The motion passes without a vote.

  5. House of Commons Commission motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House moves on to a motion to approve the appointment of two external members of the House of Commons Commission. The Commission is responsible for the administration and services of the Commons and the maintenance of the Palace of Westminster.

    The two external members proposed are Dame Janet Gaymer, an employment lawyer and a former chair of the Commons Management Board and Jane McCall who is a non-executive director at the Office for Legal Complaints.

  6. Enterprise Bill receives second reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to give the Enterprise Bill it's second reading by 300 to 62, a majority of 238.

  7. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords clock
    Image caption: Peers will return tomorrow at 3:00pm
  8. MPs divide on Enterprise Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting to give the Enterprise Bill a second reading.

    The division result is due at 19:15.

    Division in the House of Commons
  9. Peers reject fatal motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers vote 230 votes to 91 to reject the Liberal Democrat's fatal motion. 

    Labour's Lord Grantchester chooses to withdraw his motion. 

    House of Lords
  10. Small but 'perfectly formed' bill

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Anna Soubry says this is a "small bill, but it is perfectly formed". It is a "small part of the bigger engine that is our economy".

    On Sunday trading she promises protections for workers who do not want to work on a Sunday, and adds that extending opening hours "is not mandatory" and that councils don't have to make use of the power if they don't want to. She says that "Sundays will still be special for those who want to keep Sundays special".

    She says the bill is about "changing culture" among big companies who delay payment to smaller companies. She says Labour criticisms of the payoff cap can be dealt with at committee stage.

    Anna Soubry
  11. Bill is a 'lucky dip'

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business minister Kevin Brennan says the bill is "not a well thought through, visionary piece of legislation" to "take on the fundamental problems of the British economy". Instead he says it is a "lucky dip of a bill", in that you can "stick your hand in" without quite knowing what you're going to get. He says Labour welcomes some measures, including the creation of the small business commissioner.

    But he criticises the cap on saying it will not just hit "fat cats", but people who have "worked hard" on "modest pay".

    He says the move to devolve Sunday trading law is typical of a government that likes "governing from the shadows" and "treating Parliament with contempt". He says the government has "no mandate in its manifesto" or any "compelling case to do so". He adds that the bill has gone all the way through the Lords and to second reading without anyone seeing what the Sunday trading plans are.

    Kevin Brennan
  12. Peers vote on feed-in tarrifs

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Featherstone pushes her fatal motion to a vote after "failing to hear willingness" from the government "to make further amendments" to policy on feed-in tariffs.

  13. 'Clear mandate'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Climate Change Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth gets to his feet to respond to the debate for the government.

    He says he welcomes the Labour Party's approach to regret the motion, rather than annul it and overturning a government decision through the anti-government majority in the Lords "isn't what the House is all about" he says.

    Defending the government's decision to remove the feed-in tariff Lord Bourne argues that the Conservatives "have a clear mandate to keep prices in the energy sector as low as possible while de-carbonising it."

    Climate Change Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth
  14. Enterprise 'only way' to increase prosperity

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Seema Kennedy says she "very much welcomes" measures in the bill to deal with late payment to small businesses, which she says can have big consequences.

    Unsurprisingly she is very supportive of the bill as a whole and says that there is "only one way to increase the prosperity of our nation, and that is through enterprise".

    Meanwhile her fellow backbench Conservative Lucy Frazer welcomes the introduction of the small business commissioner and says a similar scheme in the Australian state of Victoria had an 80% success rate.

    She says she's supportive of the bill in general because "it's not government that creates jobs, it's businesses".

  15. 'Addicted to subsidies'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Donoughue was head of the Number 10 policy unit under Harold Wilson and is a climate change sceptic. He says this will be the first time in 31 years in the House of Lords that he has publicly supported a Conservative government measure. 

    On this occasion though he says that he has to acknowledge that the Conservative Secretary of State has "done something to slow the massive transfer of wealth from the poor to the rich - as poorer families pay the higher price for green subsidies."

    He argues that some members of his party are "addicted to subsidies" but adds "as a 62 year old member of the Labour Party" he is against the passing of wealth from the poor to the rich."

    Lord Donoughue
  16. Government's 'cavalier' approach over tariff cuts

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Worthington accuses the government of behaving in a "cavalier way" over its cuts to feed-in tariffs.

    While she says she understands the "sentiment" -  to ensure costs are not placed on those who cannot bear them - Baroness Worthington says they have "severely dented investor confidence" in the green energy sector.

    The green energy sector needs greater respect, she adds. 

    Labour peer Baroness Worthington
  17. 'They are putting Britain at a disadvantage'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Deben, Chair of the Committee on Climate Change doesn't want to tell the minister how to act but reminds him that the government is committed to delivering a reduction in carbon emissions.

    He suggest peers take Viscount Ridley's comments carefully because he does not have "the same urgency on climate change that the science gives us".

    He says that people "still fighting that some how or other climate change isn't happening - they are putting Britain at a disadvantage".

  18. MPs urged to create 'right environment' for business

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP for Basingstoke Maria Miller says "the most important thing we can be doing" is talking about enterprise, and that the "best people to run British businesses are business men and women".

    She says MPs' role should be to "make sure we have the right environment for business to thrive". 

    Maria Miller
  19. Robin Hood or the Sheriff of Nottingham?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Viscount Ridley takes issue with Lord Grantchester's description of feed-in tariffs as "highly sucessful".

    He suggests that the policy has been very successful at taking money off poor people, whose energy bills have risen, and giving money to the rich who can afford to put up solar power panels and therefore benefit from subsidies.

    He wonders why the parties opposite him are "taking the side of Sheriff of Nottingham against Robin Hood".

    Viscount Ridley
  20. Hug a husky?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Liberal leader David Steel quotes his current leader Tim Farron's characterisation of the government's energy policy.

    Quote Message: The Prime Minister has not so much hugged a husky but taken it round the back of the shed, shot it and told the Energy Secretary that its gone to live on a farm.
    David Cameron