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Summary

  1. MPs debated private members' bills - beginning with report stage of the Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill.
  2. The House of Lords also examined private members' bills with Lord Empey's Airports Act 1986 (Amendment) Bill first on the list.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons adjourns, bringing to an end our coverage of Parliament for this week.

    MPs and peers return on Monday, when the Commons will debate the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill while the Lords consider the Immigration Bill.

  2. Minister replies

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Richard Harrington acknowledges that a scheme aimed at reducing gang and youth violence is coming to an end after four years.

    The ministers says it will be replaced by a new programme, though Chuka Umunna intervenes to say this is not enough.

    Mr Harrington says the government's priorities include targeting young people who sell drugs, safeguarding places such as care homes where vulnerable young people can be targeted, and "early intervention".

    He adds that knife crime is lower than it was in 2010 but has shown a recent increase, which may be a result of "better reporting" to the police.

  3. '225 gangs' in London

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chuka Umunna

    "There are 225 recognised gangs in London," says Labour's Chuka Umunna.

  4. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The time for debating private members' bills runs out and the House moves to the adjournment debate.

    Labour MP Chuka Umunna opens a debate on gangs and serious youth violence in London.

    He cites a father from Somalia who felt his family would be safer in Mogadishu and regretted bringing them to London.

    "That is a damning indictment of the situation on London's streets," Mr Umunna says.

  5. 'Not the answer'

    Child Victims of Human Trafficking Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Richard Harrington says he "can't accept the assertion" that children are treated worse than adults.

    Guidance makes clear that trafficked children are "some of the most vulnerable people in the country", he insists.

    Making such cases the responsibility of central government is "not the answer", he adds.

  6. Labour 'cannot accept' notion of bill

    Child Victims of Human Trafficking Bill

    Sarah Champion

    Shadow home office minister Sarah Champion pays tribute to Conservative Peter Bone for introducing the bill.

    However, she says she "cannot accept the notion of central government having responsibility for one particular group of children".

    This could lead to a "more fragmented" approach by taking them out of local authority care, she argues.

  7. MP hopes 'principles' of bill will be considered

    Child Victims of Human Trafficking Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Private members' bills rarely become law, especially ones without government support.

    Peter Bone says he does not expect the bill to "progress today" but he hopes the principles behind it can be debated.

    The Conservative MP says he knows both government and opposition want to help victims of human trafficking.

  8. Traffickers are 'patently evil' - MP

    Child Victims of Human Trafficking Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Peter Bone

    "The people that do human trafficking are the same people who do drugs and guns," Conservative MP Peter Bone says.

    "When you break these gangs up, you're breaking the drug and gun gangs up at the same time," he adds.

    Such people are "patently evil", Mr Bone tells the House.

  9. End of the day for peers

    Age of Criminal Responsibility Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dholakia's bill is given its second reading and is committed to a committee of the whole House - the next stage. 

    And with that, it's the end of the day's debates in the House of Lords. Peers will return on Monday at 2.30pm. 

  10. Child Victims of Human Trafficking Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill clears third reading without a vote.

    The next private members' bill is the Child Victims of Human Trafficking (Central Government Responsibility) Bill, sponsored by Conservative MP Peter Bone.

    The bill would make the government responsible for "the safeguarding and care of victims of human trafficking, under the age of 18 years".

    This short bill, which applies to England and Wales, has only three clauses.

  11. 'Legislation takes time'

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister George Freeman says Lord Saatchi began the debate that led to the bill, adding that the passage of legislation takes time and is "a messy business".

    He says there are currently "200 industrial studies in new medicines in the UK".

    Health Minister George Freeman
  12. Bill 'made safer'

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander

    Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander says the amendments made to the bill have "made it safer".

    She still questions whether "legislation is really needed" but believes the bill has been improved and so Labour will not be opposing it.

  13. 'Legacy' for Saatchis

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lord Saatchi
    Image caption: Lord Saatchi claimed doctors are deterred from trying new forms of treatment

    Report stage - the final chance for MPs to amend the bill - concludes and debate moves to third reading.

    Conservative MP Chris Heaton-Harris opens this final consideration of the bill's general principles.

    He pays tribute to Tory peer Lord Saatchi, whose wife Josephine Hart died from peritoneal cancer in 2011 and who called the current law a "barrier to progress in curing cancer".

    "The terrible loss that Lord Saatchi had suffered" was the inspiration for the bill, Mr Heaton-Harris says, and the legislation would be a "legacy" for him to remember his wife.

  14. Bill sponsor: 'Get on with this database'

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bill sponsor Chris Heaton-Harris speaks in support of a database of innovative medical treatments in England.

    If the House passes the bill, the Conservative MP says, it will "send an unambiguous political signal to the government that we would like them very much to get on with this database".

    Chris Heaton-Harris
  15. Lords debate age of criminal responsibility

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dholakia is now introducing his Age of Criminal Responsibility Bill, which is being debated at second reading.

    The bill would increase the age of criminal responsibility from 10, to 12 years of age. It would apply in England and Wales.

  16. Justice statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Justice Minister Lord Faulks is now making a statement on criminal legal aid services - it was aired earlier in the House of Commons as an urgent question.

  17. Database of innovative treatments

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill would create a database of "innovative medical treatments carried out by doctors in England" maintained by information service, the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC).

    A Labour amendment would require a wide range of bodies to be consulted on the database, including the General Medical Council and the British Medical Association.

    Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris argues that the amendment would "add to the confusion as to who is policing the system".

  18. Back to the bill

    Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The urgent questions are over and debate resumes on the Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill.

  19. 'It's not about you'

    Urgent question on BIS office closure

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker John Bercow

    Speaker John Bercow intervenes on shadow minister Gordon Marsden to admonish Business Minister Anna Soubry, who has been interrupting the speech from her seat.

    "It's not about you, it's about the issue," Mr Bercow tells her.

    When her turn comes to respond, she says: "It's not about me... it's about the workers."

    She describes Mr Marsden's contribution as "rubbish". The Speaker says: "It was also perfectly in order."