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Summary

  1. MPs on the Culture, Media and Sport Committee have taken evidence on blood doping in athletics.
  2. The Commons met at 11.30 GMT and after Justice questions, there was an urgent question on the NHS 111 service, following the death of baby William Mead.
  3. MPs then considered the remaining stages of the Charities (Protection and Social Investment) Bill.
  4. The Home Affairs Committee heard from witnesses on the migration crisis.
  5. Peers met at 14.30 GMT and after oral questions, considered Commons' amendments to the Psychoactive Substances Bill.
  6. They then move onto second reading of the Housing and Planning Bill.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords coverage

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    We have to end our live commentary of the House of Lords here but you can watch proceedings on BBC Parliament or using the Live Coverage tab above.

  2. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That concludes the day's business in the Commons.

    MPs will return tomorrow at 11:30 GMT for Cabinet Office questions, followed by Prime Minister's Questions.

    House of Commons clock
  3. 'Only in exceptional circumstances'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    James Wharton

    Communities and Local Government Minister James Wharton tells MPs that the National Planning Policy Framework makes clear that building on green belt land should only take place in "exceptional circumstances" and only after "extensive local consultation" has taken place.

    He says the secretary of state has appointed an independent person to inspect Birmingham's building plans and that only in "very rare" circumstances would a minister intervene.

    He says that the debate has sent a message to Birmingham City Council that local people want to see brownfield sites built on first.

  4. Homes 'must be built in the right place'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Andrew Mitchell says he fully understands the importance of building more homes for the future.

    However, he adds that these homes must be built in the right place and calls on the government to take the necessary action. 

    Andrew Mitchell
  5. 'Unsatisfactory' evidence

    Asylum accommodation

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz says he finds Stuart Monk's evidence "unsatisfactory".

    Mr Vaz tells him: "You've blamed ministers, the Times, G4S, Home Office officials and, I think in one of your answers, the people of Middlesbrough."

    Mr Monk disputes this.

    Mr Vaz also urges the G4S representatives to "reflect on" the matter as well, before the committee adjourns.

    Home Affairs Committee
  6. Green belt: A housing crisis solution?

    BBC News

    Rural landscape

    The chance of becoming a home owner in the South East is becoming more remote for many people, with house building falling far short of demand according to figures.

    The National Housing Federation estimated 974,000 homes were needed between 2011 and 2014, but figures from 326 councils showed only 457,490 were built.

    The figures suggest the problem is most prevalent in Kent, Sussex and Surrey.

    Watch video here

  7. Adjournment debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs then approve the Charities Bill at third reading. It will now return to the House of Lords for consideration of amendments.

    The final item of business for the day is Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell's adjournment debate on building on the green belt.

    Birmingham City Council has proposed building 6,000 homes and a factory on Sutton Coldfield’s green belt.

    A government planning inspector has said that Birmingham should build 51,000 homes over the next 20 years.

    Andrew Mitchell has argued that Sutton Coldfield’s green belt is not the best place for the new homes.

    House construction
  8. Tribute to Henry Worsley

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Tom Tugendhat pays tribute to his old army colleague Henry Worsley, the explorer who died from a serious infection as he tried to cross Antarctica.

    Quote Message: It is people like him who set the example for our charity sector. He always went that little bit further."
    Will Gow, Henry Adams and Henry Worsley in Greenland in 2008
    Image caption: Will Gow, Henry Adams and Henry Worsley in Greenland in 2008
  9. Contractor promises improved complaint response

    Asylum accommodation

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Nusrat Ghani

    Conservative MP Nusrat Ghani says it is good that asylum seekers' doors are being "painted a multitude of colours" but asks Stuart Monk what he plans to do to improve his company's response to complaints.

    Mr Monk promises a "proactive review of everything we have been doing and the way we've been doing it", adding:

    Quote Message: With the benefit of hindsight, we've been very silly."
  10. Bill impacts 'across these islands'

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Martin Docherty

    Speaking on behalf of the SNP Martin Docherty notes that this bill "does have an impact" on charity and civic society "across these islands".

    However, he assures MPs that "when it comes to Scotland it will be for the Scottish Parliament alone to legislate on these issues".

  11. Bill helps charities achieve their objectives

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Anna Turley, shadow cabinet office minister, expresses disappointment that Labour amendments weren't accepted.

    However she accepts that the bill ensures there is a legislative framework in place that will help charities to fulfill their objectives.

    She assures ministers that Labour will continue to scrutinise and monitor the implications of the bill.

    Anna Turley
  12. 'Is your front door red?'

    Asylum accommodation

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz

    Stuart Monk from Jomast says he has not heard from Suzanne Fletcher, a former local councillor in Middlesbrough, who spoke to the media about asylum seekers' doors being painted red.

    Ms Fletcher told the BBC's Today programme she had raised the issue with G4S as far back as 2012 but was told the company would not ask Jomast to repaint the doors.

    "Is your front door red, Mr Monk?" asks Home Affairs Committee chairman Keith Vaz.

    "No it isn't red," he replies.

  13. Charities Bill reaches third reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The legislative grand committee stage concludes and the Charity Bill moves to its third reading.

    Minister for the Cabinet Office, Matthew Hancock says the bill will give the Charity Commission the power to tackle serous mismanagement of charities.

    He tells MPs he is reassured by the safeguards in place and anticipates that most charities will not be directly impacted by the bill.

  14. Consent motion agreed to

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Natascha Engel reminds MPs that this stage of debate is about the bill itself rather than the English votes for English laws procedure.

    She suggest they either debate the bill or put it to a vote.

    The consent motion is subsequently agreed to.

    Natascha Engel
  15. Bill clearly restricted to England and Wales

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Matthew Hancock seeks to explain that this section of the debate ensures there is consent from MPs whose constituencies are covered by the Charity Bill.

    He argues that the bill is clearly restricted to activities that take place in England and Wales.

    Matthew Hancock
  16. 'A serious constitutional issue'

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Independent MP Sylvia Hermon raises concern about the English votes for English laws: "It is a serious constitutional issue."

    She argues that even though Northern Ireland has a devolved charity commission, many charities are based in England and that the bill affects her constituents.

    She therefore seeks an explanation as to why the bill as been designated England only. 

    Sylvia Hermon
  17. Legislative Grand Committee

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons is resumed and the Speaker tells MPs that the Charities Bill relates exclusively to England and Wales and that a consent motion is therefore required for the bill to proceed.

    The House consequently is resolved into a legislative grand committee England and Wales.

  18. G4S: 'There was no policy' on red doors

    Asylum accommodation

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Keith Vaz invites John Whitwam from G4S to "dissociate himself" from a policy of painting asylum seekers' doors red.

    Mr Whitwam does so, saying that investigations have "found there was no policy".

    Like Stuart Monk of contractors Jomast, Mr Whitwam says no asylum seeker "has raised this as an issue".

    He adds that, following a report in the Times, the company checked the houses of asylum seekers and found that "175 doors out of 298 were red", which is around 59%.

  19. Amendment eight defeated

    Charities Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Amendment eight is also defeated 280 votes to 196.

    Report stage has now been concluded and the House will be briefly suspended as the Speaker considers his decision about certification under the English votes for English laws procedure. 

    The certification deems which parts of the bill apply to England or England and Wales only.