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Summary

  1. The day began with communities questions in the Commons.
  2. There was then an urgent question on Sports Direct and compliance with the national minimum wage.
  3. That was followed by two ministerial statements: the first on the Paris climate change talks, the second on airport capacity.
  4. MPs then moved on to the European Union (Approvals) Bill.
  5. In the Lords there were questions on Sunday trading, transport and faith schools.
  6. The Lords debated Commons amendments to the European Union Referendum Bill and then the Welfare Reform and Work Bill.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies, Alicia McCarthy and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House adjourns after a long day.

    Peers will meet tomorrow from 14:30 GMT to put questions to the government and to debate the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill.

    The House of Commons meets before that, from 11:30 GMT, to put questions to business, innovation and skills ministers.

    Also, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond will make a statement on Syria.

  2. And finally...

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The final group of amendments for debate tonight include one with Labour and Liberal Democrat backing to require "information about the uptake of apprenticeships broken down by region, age, ethnicity, disability, sector, qualification and level".

    Crossbench and Lib Dem peers have put their names to another amendment to require reporting on the provisions of apprenticeships for disabled people.

  3. Party whips clash over the late running of the debate

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bassam of Brighton

    Labour chief whip Lord Bassam of Brighton says he is "really not happy" that the House is sitting so late.

    He agrees to discuss one more group of amendments but adds that there are a number of "severely disabled" peers attending the debate.

    Government chief whip Lord Taylor of Holbeach agrees to discussion of one more group of amendments but tells peers that the "order of consideration" was agreed with the opposition, adding that the House has not reached its target for the day.

    Normally, discussions at committee stage and report stage aim to deal with a certain number of amendments in a sitting, though time does not always permit this. The process is agreed through "the usual channels" - a term for arrangements between party whips.

    Lord Taylor of Holbeach
  4. 'Simply not affordable'

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    Work and Pensions Minister Lord Freud says the Labour proposal is "simply not affordable in the current context" of the economic situation but adds that he regrets having to say that.

  5. 'Mobility' amendment

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Sherlock

    Labour's Baroness Sherlock proposes an amendment to the "mobility component" of the disability living allowance.

    The allowance for disabled people has a care component for people who need supervision or help looking after themselves and a mobility component for those who cannot walk or find it very difficult to walk.

    The amendment would extend the mobility component to a young child who "from birth and on account of a condition, must always be accompanied by bulky medical equipment which cannot be carried around with him or her without great difficulty".

  6. Amendments withdrawn

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers withdraw their proposed amendments in the current group for debate.

    The usual convention for committee stage in the House of Lords is that amendments are not usually pushed to a vote.

    Peers propose amendments to enable debate and often re-introduce them at the next stage - report stage - when they are often voted on.

  7. Minister argues amendment is not needed

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Work and Pensions Minister Lord Freud says that the government's aim to close the gap between the employment rates of disabled and non-disabled people is part of its aim to move to full employment.

    He argues that an amendment requiring a report on the disability employment gap is therefore not necessary, as information will be in his department's "annual report on full employment". 

  8. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons adjourns.

    MPs will meet again tomorrow at 11:30 GMT, when they will put questions to ministers from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

    There will be a ten minute rule bill on free school meals and then two opposition day debates: one on climate change and flooding, the other on the government's housing record.

    There will be an adjournment debate on transgender prisoners at the end of the day.

  9. Apprenticeship route into nursing

    Student nurse finance

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Ben Gummer says that it will be possible to get in to nursing via an apprenticeship route as well as a university route. This will go up to level six degree level. 

    He adds that the advantage of the apprenticeship route would be that nurses could "earn while they learn". 

  10. 'We're not one homogeneous group'

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Grey-Thompson

    Crossbench peer Baroness Grey-Thompson says she supports the government's aim to halve the disability employment gap, but backs an amendment requiring reporting and monitoring of progress. 

    She argues:

    Quote Message: We're not one homogeneous group. We're not the disabled. We're disabled people and there will be different solutions required for different people."
  11. Government says current system unsustainable

    Student nurse finance

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ben Gummer
    Image caption: Ben Gummer

    Health Minister Ben Gummer responds to the debate on ending grants for student nurses.

    He says that nursing courses are very oversubscribed, and the government cannot fund a place for every qualified applicant who wants one under the current system.

    He argues that more nurses are required in the NHS, and that maintaining the grant system will not satisfy either the demand or the supply problem.

    He says that since tuition fees were raised in the last parliament, poorer students have not been put off from applying for university, and he does not believe that people will be put off from nursing as a result of the abolition of grants. 

  12. 'Assault on key public sector workers'

    Student nurse finance

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Wes Streeting
    Image caption: Wes Streeting

    MPs move on to their last business of the day, a debate on funding for student nurses tabled by the Labour MP Wes Streeting.

    In the autumn statement, Chancellor George Osborne announced that grants for student nurses are to be replaced with loans.

    Mr Streeting says the policy is an "assault on key public sector workers". 

  13. Peer calls for report on the 'disability employment gap'

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Campbell of Surbiton

    Baroness Campbell of Surbiton introduces an amendment which would require an annual report to be laid "before Parliament annually on the progress which has been made towards meeting the commitment to halve the disability employment gap".

    The government says it wants to halve the 33% gap between the rate of employment of disabled and non-disabled people. 

    The crossbench peer and disability campaigner says:

    Quote Message: Disabled people still face significant challenges that prevent them pursuing interesting careers."
  14. Government motion passes

    European Agenda on Migration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    James Brokenshire
    Image caption: James Brokenshire

    Home Office Minister James Brokenshire responds to the debate. He says the deal the EU has made with Turkey does not guarantee Turks the rights to enter the UK, and is conditional.

    He describes the government's response to the migration crisis as "practical", and the motion passes without a division. 

  15. UKIP MP says Turkey deal is 'against the national interest'

    European Agenda on Migration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Douglas Carswell
    Image caption: Douglas Carswell

    UKIP MP Douglas Carswell says the House should not approve the motion. The motion effectively asks the House to approve a deal the EU has made with Turkey. Douglas Carswell says this is a good deal for Turkey but is not in the UK's national interest.

    Under the deal, Turkey will receive €3bn (£2.1bn) and political concessions in return for clamping down on its borders and keeping refugees in the country.

    Furthermore, Turkish citizens may be able to travel without visas in Europe's Schengen area, which allows free movement between many European countries, by October 2016.

    However, the visa rules will be relaxed only if Turkey meets certain conditions.  

    Mr Carswell argues that many Turkish migrants will end up coming to the UK, even though it is outside the Schengen area.

    Read more here.

  16. 'War and destitution' behind mass migration

    European Agenda on migration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Grant
    Image caption: Peter Grant

    The SNP's Peter Grant asks what the government thinks the "root causes" of the migrant crisis are, and adds that he thinks it is "war and destitution".

    He says the risks migrants are taking are not foolish, they are the calculated acts of desperate people, and not connected to a desire to access European welfare systems. 

  17. Government consulting on policy

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Freud says the government will await the results of a consultation before putting a final policy in place, including what "specific exemptions will be applied".

    He adds that this information will not be available by the time the bill reaches its next stage in the Lords. 

  18. Labour peer: Savings will be offset by costs elsewhere

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour work and pensions spokesman Lord McKenzie of Luton says any savings from removing automatic entitlement to housing benefit from 18 to 21-year-olds will be offset by costs elsewhere, such as increased homelessness.

    He rejects any notion that some young people want to "live on the dole", saying that young people are entitled to £57.90 a week in Jobseekers' Allowance.

    "Frankly, what we would blow on a meal at the weekend", he adds. 

  19. Conservative MP welcomes Operation Sophia

    European Agenda on Migration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Bill Cash
    Image caption: Sir Bill Cash

    Sir Bill Cash welcomes the government's action on people smugglers by taking part in Operation Sophia.

    Under Operation Sophia, naval vessels can board, search, seize and divert vessels suspected of being used for people smuggling.

    Read more here

  20. 'Ruthless criminal networks'

    European Agenda on Migration

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Keir Starmer
    Image caption: Keir Starmer

    Shadow home office minister Keir Starmer says Labour supports the aims of the motion. However he argues that the EU has not yet found a "sustainable" solution to the migrant crisis.

    He adds that "ruthless criminal networks" organise the smuggling of people into the EU, and welcomes action against them.