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Summary

  1. Labour former prime minister, Tony Blair gave evidence to the Foreign Affairs Committee on Libya.
  2. The Lords debated bills on online safety and on a constitutional convention.

Live Reporting

By Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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  1. Lords adjourns

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hughes of Woodside withdraws his amendment and the Constitutional Convention Bill passes to report stage.

     The House of Lord adjourns.    

    Join us next week for more live coverage from Westminster. 

  2. Govt "does not support a written constitution"

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bridges of Headley
    Image caption: Lord Bridges of Headley

    Lord Bridges of Headley says the government "does not support" a written constitution. 

    He says Parliament has been "evolving and advancing" the constitution for centuries, but there is "no need" for it to be written.

    He said there is no detail in the bill on what a written constitution would entail. 

  3. A written constitution?

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Hughes of Woodside is moving his amendment to the Constitutional Convention Bill.

    The amendment would insert a new Clause which states, 

    "The convention shall produce a draft written constitution on the powers and functions of the House of Commons and the House of Lords."

    This is "an absolute necessity", he says. 

    He argues that if the second chamber were to become elected, this would be vital to ensure the two Houses were not squabbling over constitutional matters.

  4. Not an 'impertinence'

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Purvis
    Image caption: Lord Purvis of Tweed

    Lord Purvis of Tweed says it is in "no way, shape or form" an "impertinence" for the people of this country to be involved in revising the House of Lords and its role.

    He says he firmly believes in securing a "holistic view of what the union is for".  

  5. Labour: a 'need for this convention'

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour spokeswoman Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town says there is a "need" for this convention. 

    She says the one piece of electoral change that should certainly be considered seriously, is votes for 16 and 17-year-olds.

    Read more about this issue here.

    Baroness Hayter
    Image caption: Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town
  6. Background to the bill

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are debating the Constitutional Convention Bill at Committee Stage.

    The bill proposes a new constitutional convention for the United Kingdom

    The bill calls for a year-long convention of politicians from all parties and representatives from civic society.

    Read more about the Constitutional Convention Bill here.

  7. Bill "far too ambitious"

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Forsyth of Drumlean says the bill is "far too ambitious".

    Lord Forsyth supports the idea of a constitutional convention but says it is an "impertinence" to suggest that reform of the House of Lords should be decided outside Parliament and not by Parliamentarians. 

    This makes some peers chuckle. 

    Lord Forsyth of Drumlean
    Image caption: Lord Forsyth of Drumlean
  8. Peer 'favours' current system

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Grocott
    Image caption: Lord Grocott

    Labour peer Lord Grocott says he is "very much in favour" of the current system. 

    He hopes that nobody is suggesting we should have another Scottish referendum anytime soon. 

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Wallace of Saltaire describes Lord Grocott as "deeply conservative" on constitutional issues.

    The Lib Dem argues that other electoral systems should be considered, but assures Lord Grocott there is "little demand" for another referendum in Scotland. 

  9. Constitutional Convention Bill debate begins

    Constitutional Convention Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers move on to debate the Constitutional Convention Bill at committee stage.

    This Private Members' Bill was introduced by Liberal Democrat peer Lord Purvis of Tweed.

    The bill make provision for a convention to consider the constitution of the United Kingdom.

  10. Title of bill changed

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Howe moves amendment 14.

    This amendment changes the title of the bill.

    She says this will now "accurately define the bill as it now stands". 

    The words “information to be provided about online safety by internet service providers and mobile phone operators”  will be added. 

    You can find all documents about the bill here.

    The amendment is agreed to.

  11. Bill won't 'cure root problems'

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Earl Erroll says this bill won't cure "the root problems" of internet safety. 

    He says in the "real world", some of the solutions offered are too simplistic and the industry is very complex.

    "The real challenge is enforcing vendors from selling products to minors", he says. 

    Earl Erroll maintains that he is "not championing the industry", as some peers suggest. 

  12. 'it will take time'

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Shields
    Image caption: Baroness Shields

    Minister Baroness Shields says the goverment is in discussion with experts and internet service providers to deal with this properly.

    She says it "will take time" for the companies to go back to their engineering teams and implement any recommendations.

    The industry is always "evolving" and processes must be "consultative", she adds.  

  13. Peer: Ofcom needs to help

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Healy
    Image caption: Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill

    Labour Peer Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill supports amendment 3A.

    She says that all internet service providers should be subject to the same filtering obligations. 

    Baroness Healy calls on the government to "make legal provision for filtering" and that 

    Quote Message: Ofcom should have to report on all internet service providers." from Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill Labour Peer
    Baroness Healy of Primrose HillLabour Peer
  14. 'Hundreds of thousands' left exposed

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Democratic Unionist Peer, Lord Morrow, moves amendment 3A.

    The amendment relates to the filtering mechanisms provided by mobile phone providers across the UK. 

    Lord Morrow says "not all children are fortunate" to live in households where providers conduct adequate filtering of adult content. 

    He says "twelve per cent of the market and "hundreds of thousands of children" are left exposed. 

  15. Age 'needs to be verifiable'

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Stevenson
    Image caption: Lord Stevenson

    Labour spokesman Lord Stevenson of Balmacara says it's important to make "age is verifiable".

    He adds that he "isn't sure we've got to that point".

  16. A "dangerous situation"

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Benjamin moves amendment three.

    The "probing" amendment concerns a review of adult content filter setting options across the internet.

    She says we are in a "dangerous situation" with regard to age verification and the way in which young people are currently able to access adult content. 

    The Liberal Democrat peer says significant numbers of people are "exposed" and this needs to be "rethought". 

    "We need credible age-verification procedures", she adds.

    Baroness Benjamin
    Image caption: Baroness Benjamin
  17. Minister: "we are the envy of our international equivalents"

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Internet Safety Minister Baroness Shields says, "the government is absolutely committed to the protection of children online".

    She cites the Family Online Safety institute which says "the UK is at the forefront of online safety", 

    Baroness Shields says the legislation we already have is adequate and "we are the envy of our international equivalents".

    Baroness Howe withdraws her amendment.

    Baroness Shields
    Image caption: Baroness Shields
  18. 'We need to protect our children'

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Ramsbotham rises in support of the amendment. 

    "Nothing is more important than the future well-being of our children", he says. 

    He says the whole House should admire the "determination" of Baroness Howe. 

  19. World of online devices is 'moving rapidly'

    Online Safety Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer, Baroness Howe of Idlicote moves amendment one to her Online Safety Bill.

    Amendment one makes provisions to protect children and young people from "adult content" and equip parents with the tools to do so.

    The world of online devices is "moving rapidly" and legislation needs to accommodate these changes, she says. 

    Baroness Howe
    Image caption: Baroness Howe of Idlicote
  20. Coming up in the Lords

    House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Welcome to today's coverage of the House of Lords.

    The main business of the day is the Online Safety Bill, a Private Members' Bill tabled by Baroness Howe of Idlicote.

    Private Members' Bills are bills introduced by MPs and Lords who are not government ministers.

    House of Lords
    Image caption: House of Lords