Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. George Osborne took centre stage at midday, filling in for David Cameron at prime minister's questions.
  2. There were two opposition day debates: one on mental health, one on the impact of the autumn statement on women.
  3. The Lords asked questions on alcohol and then returned to the Welfare Reform and Work Bill.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Chris Davies and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has adjourned for the day.

    It will sit again tomorrow at 11:00 GMT, and begin with the introductions of Baroness Jowell and the Lord Darling of Roulanish.

    There will then be questions on overseas students, privatising Channel 4, the balance of payments, and the European Court of Human Rights.

    These will be followed by debates on legal aid, religious conflicts and violence, the financial care sector, and the risks concentrated in Central Counterparties.

  2. Bill will have 'disproportionate effect on women'

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Manzoor says the bill will have a "disproportionate effect on women."

    She adds that the government is not providing support and care in "the way they says they will".

    However the amendments are withdrawn and the debate will resume at a later date.

  3. Government says sanctions needed in welfare system

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Evans
    Image caption: Baroness Evans

    Government spokesperson Baroness Evans says the government is "investing in an enhanced childcare offer. She adds that she is "confident" the childcare sector will produce the places needed.

    She says that the "advice that claimants get will be of the highest quality and tailored to their needs."

    She argues that benefit sanctions are necessary to make the system work, saying "benefits regimes get people into work" and "sanctions underpin this."

  4. Grandparents relied on for childcare

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hollis
    Image caption: Baroness Hollis

    Labour's Baroness Hollis says "we do no kindness to lone parents" if they are unable to commit to a job they are required to take due to problems with childcare.

    She says many single parents rely on their own parents for childcare, but these grandparents are being required to stay in the labour market as well.

  5. Impairments and claimant commitments

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cross bench peer Baroness Grey-Thompson is introducing an amendment which would create a legal requirement for a long term health condition or impairment to be taken into account when drawing up a claimant commitment.

    A claimant commitment is a list of responsibilities a claimant will have to undertake in order to claim Universal Credit.

    Read more about Universal Credit here.

  6. Labour asks if the needs of parents are being disregared

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Sherlock
    Image caption: Baroness Sherlock

    Labour spokesperson Baroness Sherlock says it is a "very big step" to require parents of pre-school children to take part in work or work preparation.

    She says it is possible that DWP advisers are "disregarding" the needs of people looking after children.

    She adds that "raising children is work" and questions whether the government has considered this.

  7. Claimants with children

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Manzor
    Image caption: Baroness Manzoor

    Peers resume the committee stage of the Welfare Reform and Work Bill.

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Manzoor is introducing a group of amendments concerned with benefit claimants who have children.

    They include an amendment to ensure that claimants are not required to work more hours than they are entitled to free childcare for.

  8. Minister says decision will make us 'safer'

    EU co-operation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bates
    Image caption: Lord Bates

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says we "weren't ready" to opt in to the system of sharing DNA data with other EU countries until this year.

    He says sharing the information "will make us all a great deal safer".

  9. Labour 'welcome' change in policy

    EU co-operation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rosser
    Image caption: Lord Rosser

    Labour shadow home affairs spokesperson Lord Rosser says Labour "welcome and support the change of heart from the government", and agrees with the decision to opt in to the Prum decisions.

    He questions how many criminals could have been caught if the UK hadn't opted out of them in the first place.

  10. Liberal Democrats support government

    EU co-operation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Paddick
    Image caption: Lord Paddick

    Liberal Democrat Lord Paddick says that the Lib Dems have had "concerns" about sharing DNA data.

    He argues they changed the law when in government to delete innocent people from the DNA database, which he says makes it a better system.

    He says that the Liberal Democrats support opting in to the Prum decisions.

  11. Short debate begins

    EU co-operation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are considering two motions at the same time. The motions read:

    Lord Bates to move that this House supports Her Majesty’s Government’s decision to opt in to the Prüm decisions and the related safeguards put in place in respect of access to data by other States.

    Baroness Prashar to move that this House takes note of the Report from the European Union Committee The United Kingdom’s participation in Prüm.

    The Prüm agreement tackles serious and organised crime through shared DNA and fingerprint databases.  

  12. Halving the disability employment gap

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Freud
    Image caption: Lord Freud

    Minister Lord Freud says that help is available to disabled people who want to work and the government has set a target to "halve the disability employment gap."

    The disability employment gap is the gap in employment between disabled and non-disabled people, which currently stands at 33%.

    Lords withdraw their amendments and the House moves on to a debate on EU co-operation. 

  13. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons adjourns for the evening.

    MPs meet at 09:30 GMT tomorrow for transport questions.

    The main business consists of a debate on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership trade deal between the EU and US, and another on International Human Rights Day.

    Over in the Lords tonight, debate continues on the Welfare Reform and Work Bill.

  14. Peer refused public transport 'at least once a month'

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Grey-Thompson

    Crossbench peer Baroness Grey-Thompson, a wheelchair user, says she wishes more disabled people worked at the Department for Work and Pensions.

    She talks about the difficulties disabled people face at work and estimates she is refused access to public transport "at least once a month".

    She offers to take the minister on a "tour round London" to demonstrate the problems.

  15. 'Long and proud era'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrea Leadsom says the closure of Kellingley colliery "represents the end of a long and proud era" and pays tribute to the "professionalism and humour" of miners past and present.

  16. Government response

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrea Leadsom

    Energy and Climate Change Minister Andrea Leadsom says the government has provided support to UK Coal, the employer at Kellingley colliery.

    She says it is "not true" that no state aid was provided but argues that "support in a commercial manner" did not tie the company "to a fixed closure date".

    Labour's Yvette Cooper claims that, under EU state aid rules, the colliery would not have had to close for another three years.

    Ms Leadsom replies that the government's view was that the approach "would take too long and it wouldn't work" in the time available.

  17. Liberal Democrat asks government to 'reconsider'

    Welfare Reform Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Doocey says disabled people need support, not "the threat of no food on the table".

    She asks the government to reconsider the bill.

  18. Conservative peer says employers' attitudes need to change

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Blencathra

    Conservative peer Lord Blencathra says says the bill "is right in principle" but it must be made to work in practice.

    He says there are "tens of thousands of people" who have become ill who can work in some way, but not as much as they could when they were fully fit.

    He argues these people should be helped to work and, among other things, that means changing the attitudes of employers.

  19. Conservative MP recalls miners' strike

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nigel Adams, the Conservative MP for Selby and Ainsty, says he had family members on both sides of the 1984-85 miners' dispute.

    "It was highly divisive strike which, in my view, lacked legitimacy because of the lack of a ballot," he says.

    He adds that the Drax coal-fired power station in North Yorkshire cannot take any more of the type of coal produced at Kellingley colliery, as a result of EU emissions limits.

    He tells the House that miners facing redundancy have had access to courses and jobs fairs, but acknowledges concerns about redundancy pay, adding:

    Quote Message: It's an outrage that we tossing coal aside in favour of intermittent wind and solar."
  20. Peer calls for more support for claimants

    Welfare Reform and Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hollins

    Cross bench peer Baroness Hollins says it is "crucial" that support is "tailored to the individual".

    She has tabled an amendment which would mean that any person awarded employment and support allowance who has a mental and behavioural disorder would be offered assessment and treatment.

    About two million people in the UK receive the employment and support allowance, in some form.

    It is paid out to disabled or sick people who are unable to work or need help getting back to work.