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Summary

  1. The day in the Commons started with attorney general questions.
  2. Then David Cameron set out his case for the UK launching air strikes against Islamic state militants in Syria.
  3. After the business statement, MPs moved on to debate the report of the airports commission, which looked into runway provision in the south east of England.
  4. After questions in the Lords, there was a debate on freedom of speech in universities.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has drawn to a close for the week.

    It will reconvene on Monday with questions on the number of ministers in the Commons, the prevention of accidents,  the silk commission report, and tipping policy in restaurant chains.

    The main business of the day will be the committee stage of the National Insurance Contributions (Rate Ceilings) Bill, and the report stage of the Enterprise Bill.

    There will also be a short debate on marine cooperation in the North Sea.

  2. Important debate raises global issues

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Prior
    Image caption: Lord Prior

    Government spokesperson Lord Prior is answering the debate.

    He says it has been an "important" discussion which has raised "global issues."

    He argues that lifestyles, notably obesity, are causing a growing "disease burden." He says all modern health systems are facing sustainability issues as a result.

    He adds that "we have to treat more people outside hospitals."

  3. Peer warns against shifting resources away from the health service

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hunt
    Image caption: Lord Hunt

    Labour's Lord Hunt sums up the debate for the opposition.

    He says we need a "paradigm shift" in the way we think about health and the role of the NHS. 

    However, he warns that we should not think this means we can shift resources away from the health service.

  4. Lifestyle based ill-health is preventable

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Walmsley
    Image caption: Baroness Walmsley

    Liberal Democrat Health spokesperson Baroness Walmsley says "the crisis" in the health service cannot be resolved by the NHS alone.

    She says that "if 40% of ill-health is due to diet and lifestyle then it is preventable."

  5. Assessments for children in care

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Earl Listowel says that children who enter care should receive a mental health assessment to ensure they get the support they need, as they are often recovering from trauma.

  6. Conservative peer makes maiden speech

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Smith of Hindhead
    Image caption: Lord Smith of Hindhead

    Conservative peer Lord Smith of Hindhead is making his maiden speech. 

    He says that a "society that socialises together" is healthy and stronger.

    He adds that "virtual friends can never be the same as actual friends."

  7. Health technology

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Lane-Fox says that this is an "exciting time" for health technology.

    She says that we need to do more work on digital inclusion, as it could be the key to tackling loneliness in later life.

  8. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons adjourns for the week.

    MPs will meet again on Monday at 14.30 GMT for education questions and to debate the UK's role in the Middle East.

  9. Primary school PE 'lamentable'

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Foster
    Image caption: Lord Foster

    Liberal Democrat Lord Foster is making his maiden speech in the Lords.

    He says the House of Commons could "learn a great deal" from the "civility" of the House of Lords.

    He also calls for the "lamentable state" of physical education in primary schools to be addressed.

  10. HIV infections rising

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Masham of Ilton says the NHS is under "great stress".

    She raises the issue of sexually transmitted disease treatment, noting that the incidence of HIV infection is increasing.

    She argues that education is the key to combating this.

  11. 'Known throughout the world'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "The quality of the Royal Agricultural University is undisputed," says Education Minister Nick Boles.

    He says the former Royal Agricultural College, which gained university status in 2013, is known "throughout the world".

    He says ministers will ask the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) to ensure that no institution is affected disproportionately by funding decisions.

  12. In pictures: Royal Agricultural University through the ages

    BBC News, Gloucestershire, 2013

    Royal Agricultural College

    A Gloucestershire agricultural college, billing itself as the oldest in the English speaking world, is celebrating its new status as a university.

    See more.

  13. Funding for the Royal Agricultural University

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

    The airports debate ends and today's final Commons business begins.

    Conservative MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown is leading a short, adjournment debate on higher education funding for the Royal Agricultural University (RAU).

    The RAU, in Cirencester, was founded in 1845.

  14. Conservative peer's maiden speech

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Redfern
    Image caption: Baroness Redfern

    Conservative peer Baroness Redfern is giving her maiden speech in the Lords.

    She says that across her native North Lincolnshire they have worked hard to secure front-line health services despite cuts in local authority budgets.

  15. 'No ifs, no buts'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Closing the debate, Conservative MP Tania Matthias, who tabled the backbench motion for debate, says:

    Quote Message: I would remind the government of that promise made in 2009: no ifs, no buts, no third runway."
  16. Minister pledges to consider communities

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Robert Goodwill says the number of passengers using non-London airports has increased by a third since 2000 and London remains one of Europe's "best-connected cities".

    This "connectivity" is essential "if we are to keep growing as an economy", he argues.

    The government has not made a final decision yet, he says, but claims it will take the concerns of local communities into account and is mindful of EU air quality obligations.

    "If there should be a runway, no matter where located", the government will consider the local community, the minister insists.

    Robert Goodwill
  17. Up to '10 years to implement' decision

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow transport minister Richard Burden says, of the MPs who spoke in today's debate, there were "12 broadly against Heathrow and 10 broadly pro-Heathrow, excluding frontbenchers".

    He says Labour awaits the government's response to the Airports Commission report, which recommended a third runway at Heathrow.

    He also asks how far the UK's climate change obligations can be met if airport expansion goes ahead.

    Expansion is "a key issue for UK aviation, it is not the only one", he suggests, adding that any decision on a new runway will take up to "10 years to implement".

    Richard Burden
  18. Drop in PE in schools

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Williams says there has been a "considerable fall" in the amount of time spent of physical education in state schools.

    She adds that the effects of that drop are very serious, especially given the amount of time children spend watching television.

  19. Building a healthy society

    Health debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Crisp
    Image caption: Lord Crisp

    Peers have moved on to the last debate of the day.

    The motion reads:

    "This House takes note of the case for building a health-creating society in the United Kingdom where all sectors contribute to creating a healthy and resilient population."

    Crossbench peer Lord Crisp is opening the debate. He notes that on average, UK citizens have around seven years of ill health before they die. This compares badly to Norwegian citizens, who only suffer two. 

    Lord Crisp was the Chief Executive of the NHS from 2000 - 2006.

  20. Another MP quotes Mao

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stewart McDonald

    SNP MP Stewart McDonald replies to the debate for his party.

    He calls for regional airports to be considered and argues that airport expansion is "a national decision".

    Addressing the Labour benches, he quotes Mao Zedong in a nod to shadow chancellor John McDonnell's reply to yesterday's Autumn Statement.

    "To rebel is justified," Mr McDonald says.

  21. 'Noisiest airport in Europe'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Adam Afriyie, the Conservative MP for Windsor, calls Heathrow "the noisiest airport in Europe" with more people affected by noise there than around Gatwick airport.

    He adds that expanding Heathrow would be "further entrenching an existing market-dominant player".

  22. "Challenge extremism in all its forms"

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ahmad
    Image caption: Lord Ahmad

    Speaking for the government, Lord Ahmad sends his condolences to the victims of the Paris attacks, and says the government "stands with them."

    He says the attacks "have nothing to do with Islam."

    He states that the government "will challenge extremism in all its forms, both violent and non-violent."

    He finishes by saying we should celebrate the diverse country we are, and that "we will face this challenge head on, and we will prevail".

  23. Schools must beware extremism

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Kennedy is summing up the debate for the opposition.

    He says "schools are a focal point in our communities", and that we must "be on guard" against extremism there.

  24. The Language of anti-Muslim prejudice

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Hamwee says the language of anti-Muslim prejudice has changed from "groomers and paedos after Rotherham to bombers and terrorists after Paris."

    She says it is unhelpful for the government to talk of "British values", and describes this language as "not cohesive." 

  25. 'A recipe for judicial review'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Bob Neill says an attempt to expand Heathrow would be "a recipe for judicial review".

    Legal challenges will mean "a field day for well-heeled west London lawyers", he suggests.

    A new runway at Gatwick would "give us an immediate capacity increase", he says.

  26. Terrorism has "tenuous" connection with "true religion"

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Bishop of Rochester
    Image caption: The Bishop of Rochester

    The Bishop of Rochester, the Rt Rev, James Langstaff says the connection between "any true religion" and acts of terrorism is "tenuous at best."

    He says the challenges we face include the issue of segregation within cities, which needs addressing.

  27. 'Prosperity depends on Heathrow'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Fiona Mactaggart

    "The prosperity of Slough absolutely depends on proximity to Heathrow," says Fiona Mactaggart, the Labour MP for the town.

    She says more multinational companies have offices in Slough "than in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland put together" because of the town's proximity to the airport.

    She adds that some of those companies are considering whether to stay because of uncertainty over airport expansion.

    She also claims that "car emissions are the most significant contribution" to air pollution in the area of Heathrow.

  28. 'Increased hostility' towards Scottish Muslims since Paris attacks

    From BBC News website - 20 November

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In the week since the terror attacks in Paris, Europe has been coming together to pay tribute to the victims. But Scotland's Muslims have come together to speak up about the increasing hostility they face.

    At Glasgow Central Mosque, BBC Scotland spoke to members of the city's Islamic community about their experiences of prejudice. They reported that they have suffered from physical and verbal abuse and encouraged people to report hate crime to the police.

    Read more here.

  29. Anti-Muslim hate crime up

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hussein-Ece
    Image caption: Baroness Hussein-Ece

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Hussein-Ece says there has been a sharp rise in anti-Muslim hate crime after the Paris attacks.

    She criticises the depiction of Muslims in the media, singling out a tabloid cartoon depicting refugees as rats coming in to Europe as being unhelpful for good community relations.

  30. Neighbourhood policing "dismantled"

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Harris of Haringey says the premise behind the government's counter-terror strategy is flawed.

    He says all public agencies should see it as their "duty" to foster good community relations all the time, not just in the aftermath of terrorist atrocities.

    He argues that the only way for the police to build community confidence is by constant engagement.

    He adds that neighbourhood policing has been "dismantled" in London over the past year.

  31. The other 'Northern Powerhouse'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UUP MP Danny Kinahan says he wants UK policy on airports to benefit the "Northern Powerhouse" of Northern Ireland.

    "We seem to have the name being borrowed by others," he observes.

    At present, it is "easier to drive to Dublin and fly" than use airports in Belfast, he says.

    Quote Message: Please don't take too long in making decisions, because it matters to us."
  32. Strong positive measures needed

    Counter terror debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Mobarik
    Image caption: Baroness Mobarik

    Conservative peer Baroness Mobarik is introducing a debate on social cohesion and counter-terrorism strategy.

    The question reads:

    " To ask the Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the attacks in Paris on 13 November, what steps they plan to take to foster links between communities, as part of their counter-terrorism strategy."

    Baroness Mobarik criticises the tendency to call for the Muslim community to speak out against Islamist terror. She says that the Irish Catholic community did not face similar calls during the troubles.

    She calls for people of "all religions and none" to examine their own prejudices, and for people of different communities to interact with each other, and convey "strong, positive measures".

  33. 'Great engine of pollution'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Boris Johnson

    Conservative MP and London Mayor Boris Johnson says Heathrow "is basically in the wrong place for expansion".

    He claims: "To build this great engine of pollution in West London will cost far more than is estimated."

    If a third runway was built, "the pressure would become overwhelming" for a fourth runway, he argues adding that expansion would blight the lives of Londoners.

  34. Heathrow expansion 'would affect 320,000'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Rupa Huq is another West London MP who opposes a third runway at Heathrow.

    She says that "18,000 people would be affected by the expansion of Gatwick [but] 320,000 by Heathrow".

    She says that Stansted airport is "echoingly empty" and expansion at Manchester would fit in with the government's Northern Powerhouse strategy.

  35. National Union of Students "inconsistent on free speech

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesperson Baroness Evans says the National Union of Students have taken an "inconsistent" approach to free speech.

    She says the government was "disappointed" when the NUS passed a motion criticising the government's 'prevent' anti-terrorism strategy, but added she was encouraged by the NUS commitment not to work with the CAGE organisation.

    Read more about the controversy surrounding CAGE here.

  36. Government response

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government Whip Baroness Evans of Bowes Park is responding to the debate for the government.

    Defending the government's decision to institute a "Prevent duty" on higher eduction, Baroness Evans says schools and universities "are in a unique position" to give children and young adults "the confidence to challenge extremist ideologies."

    Government Whip Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
  37. Labour support for Prevent

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for Labour, Lord Mendelsohn tells peers that "freedom of speech and the ability to question orthodoxy [are universities] essential purpose"

    "Universities are places where controversial ideas must be heard and challenged" he tells peers.

    But, he says, the Labour party support the need for the Prevent strategy, which began under a Labour government. "The threats are real and they are there" he says.

    Labour Lord Mendelsohn
  38. Tory mayoral candidate: Competition needed

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Zac Goldsmith

    The Conservative MP for Richmond Park in South West London, Zac Goldsmith, who also signed today's motion, says Heathrow expansion has a "pitifully small upside" accompanied by "a colossal dose of pain".

    He advocates "competition between airports", arguing that new routes opening at Gatwick shows that competition works.

    The Conservative candidate for London mayor also has a dig at his Labour rival, Sadiq Khan, suggesting that he says different things to different people on the matter.

    Quote Message: His position on Heathrow is about as authentic as Donald Trump's hair."
  39. 'Not an English-only decision'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Gavin Newlands says he has received more correspondence from his constituents on airport expansion than he has on military action on Syria.

    Mr Newlands, whose constituency of Paisley and Renfrewshire North contains Glasgow International Airport, says the SNP is "neutral" on the matter but Scotland welcomes greater connectivity with London and other destinations.

    He also argues that the "connectivity that another runway provides" should not be an "English-only decision" but open to MPs from across the UK.

  40. Prevent needed in education

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Lord Blair of Boughton tells peers it is hard to over impress the "significance of Prevent as a strategy against the advance of terrorism".

    One issue with Prevent, however, is the enormous importance given to the police as the delivery agent, the Crossbench peer says.

    "Further education and higher education are absolutely vital in the delivery of Prevent" he tells peers, "because if you don't disagree with the police when you're a teenager then you're not really alive".

    Former Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Lord Blai
  41. 'No third runway at Heathrow'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ruth Cadbury

    "No ifs, no buts, no third runway at Heathrow," says Labour MP Ruth Cadbury, who put her name to the motion for debate.

    Ms Cadbury, who backs Gatwick expansion, says that Heathrow may be winning the PR battle but Parliament needs to assess the case for new runways.

    She says her constituency of Brentford and Isleworth lies under the Heathrow flightpath and while the airport brings jobs, it also brings "noise, traffic, congestion and air pollution".

    Quote Message: Expansion at Heathrow will mean 40% more flights overhead."
  42. No more 'agnosticism'

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Bew says he has taught free speech on the university campuses of Northern Ireland where freedom of speech was the "most violently contested in the United Kingdom."

    "Speakers coming to Belfast were blown up, shot at and killed" he tells peers.

    The "agnosticism" shown by the government during the Troubles towards extremist views of republican and loyalist speakers "as long as they didn't kill anyone" was the wrong approach Lord Bew says.

  43. British Values

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Several peers have complained that there is no clear definition of what is meant by "British Values."

    Conservative stalwart Lord Cormack sums up his sentiments in one sentence.

    British values are, he says, "the promotion of freedom untrammelled and unconfined".

    Conservative stalwart Lord Cormack
  44. 'Cannot have too many runways'

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Sir Gerald Howarth says: "I'm an aviator, and I therefore believe that you cannot have too many runways."

    He backs Heathrow expansion, observing that he once saw plans for a "London orbital road" which dated from 1935.

    The M25 motorway opened in 1986 and Mr Howarth argues "we cannot wait that long".

    Quote Message: We need to get on with it."
    Sir Gerald Howarth
  45. Extremism isn't terrorism

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cross bench peer Lord Skidelsky warns that two major threats to free speech come from the government and the National Union of Students.

    This is in part due to the duty placed on universities to protect university students form being "what they call radicalised."

    But the guidance provided to universities and students often "conflates terrorism and extremism" Lord Skidelsky warns, leading to many peaceful students being unnecessarily prevented from speaking due to concerns about terrorism.

    Lord Skidelsky
  46. Labour mayoral candidate backs Gatwick

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sadiq Khan

    Labour MP Sadiq Khan, who is his party's candidate for London mayor, says he backs a new runway at Gatwick airport, rather than Heathrow.

    He says the Airports Commission report by Sir Howard Davies, which recommended expansion at Heathrow, did not "rule out" Gatwick expansion.

    Mr Khan adds that Sir Howard did reject "this fantasy airport on an island", referring to a proposal for a new airport in the Thames estuary, which was backed by current London Mayor  and now Conservative MP Boris Johnson.

    Sir Howard said the proposal , nicknamed "Boris Island" was "not a plausible option".

  47. No 'right to offend'

    Fee speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cross bench peer Lord Singh of Wimbledon, one of the few Sikhs in the House of Lords, praises freedom of speech but warns peers to be wary of when it is used to "undermine the rights and belief of others."

    Freedom of speech is the "right to criticize the actions of those in positions of authority, including religions and religious authority" but does not "carry a right to gratuitously offend."

    Extremist preachers "all to frequently use the right to freedom of speech to incite hatred against others or undermine democratic institutions" he warns. 

    Cross bench peer Lord Singh of Wimbledon
  48. Academic boycotts

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Bakewell raises the issue of the "new anti-Semitism", meaning criticism of the state of Israel and its actions are condemned as anti-Semitic. 

    She acknowledges there is no consensus on the issue. 

    She says that while some academics boycott Israeli institutions she opposes this, and believes in "vigorous debate" instead.  

  49. Airports Commission debate

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Airports Commission has backed a third Heathrow runway, saying it will add £147bn in economic growth and 70,000 jobs by 2050.

    The report's release has revived intense debate over the runway's environmental impact.

    In 2009, David Cameron pledged that there would be no new runway at Heathrow.

    The government has said that it will give its official response to the Commission later in the year and it is estimated that, if given the go-ahead, any new runway would take more than a decade to build.

    The idea of expanding Heathrow has always been surrounded by controversy because of its location in a heavily built-up area. Nearly 800 homes would have to be demolished to build the new runway.  

    The decision on whether to build a third runway at Heathrow has split many in the cabinet and today's debate will likely pit two of the London mayoral candidates Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith, against one another in a Commons debate, although both oppose Heathrow expansion.

    Airport
  50. 'Foggy' report

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Opening the debate Conservative MP Tania Mathias tells the house that she, "like many people, was disappointed" in thefinal report of the airports commission. 

    The MP for Twickenham, which is near Heathrow airport, complains that the report is "shrouded in fog" filled with "if and buts" and contains factual errors.

    "The conclusion [of the report] will not serve the UK's aviation needs" she adds.

    Tania Mathias
  51. Social media enables "crusades"

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Trevethin and Oaksey
    Image caption: Lord Trevethin and Oaksey

    Crossbench peer Lord Trevethin and Oaksey is making his maiden speech.

    He says "something is going on at our universities".

    He argues that social media websites make it easier to form "crusades" and "express outrage en mass".

    He adds that universities are "letting students down" by failing to ensure there is free speech on campus and there is a risk that students could graduate "over-sensitive, and inclined to engage in emotional reasoning and not critical analysis".

  52. Airports Commission report

    Airports Commission debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After a shorter than normal business statement, due to the extended Syria statement, MPs now turn to today's back bench business debate on the final report of the airports commission.

  53. Restrictive counter-extremism guidance

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Pannick
    Image caption: Lord Pannick

    Crossbench peer Lord Pannick raises the guidance issued by the government on non-violent extremism.

    He says the guidance is not directed at speech which incites terrorism, and that it is "drafted in very restrictive terms."

    The guidance requires universities to prevent debates where extremist ideas are not guaranteed to be answered.

    He says that requiring universities to close down debate will make such ideas more attractive to a potential audience.

  54. Steel statement

    Business Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Nic Dakin points out that there was no mention of a statement on the action to be taken on the steel industry in today's business statement, despite a promise that the government would report back before Christmas.

    Leader of the House Chris Grayling says he will remind the Business Secretary Sajid Javid of this commitment.

    Nic Dakin
  55. 'Disgraceful act of betrayal'

    Business Statment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Dr Eilidh Whiteford accuses the government of "sneaking out" an announcement that they are "withdrawing the billion pound" investment in carbon capture and storage, while everyone was distracted by yesterday's Autumn Statement.

    This is a "disgraceful act of betrayal" she says and demands a statement on the decision be made before the House.

    Leader of the House Chris Grayling denies he request and counters that the government had made "huge progress" in reducing its carbon footprint.

  56. Truth unchallenged becomes dogma

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord O'Shaughnessy
    Image caption: Lord O'Shaughnessy

    Conservative peer Lord O'Shaughnessy is making his maiden speech.

    He quotes John Stuart Mill and says "truth unchallenged becomes dogma."

    He calls for universities to ensure that free speech is protected on campus.

  57. Shakespeare says

    Business Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In a theatrical flush, Shadow Leader of the House Chris Bryant produces a copy of the Shakespeare play Richard II, which he says he will give to the Leader of the House - Mirroring the actions of Shadow chancellor John McDonell's exploits with Mao's little red book.

    Reading out one of the play's most famous speeches, Mr Bryant claims "Shakespeare predicted it: 400 years ago, they would sell of all our national assets." 

    Shadow Leader of the House Chris Bryant
  58. Unintended consequences

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cross-bench peer Baroness Butler-Sloss brings up the "unintended consequence" of counter-terrorism legislation.

    She says that some young Muslims feel "othered", and that it is important that they hear from a wide variety of speakers, not just ones they agree with. 

  59. No 'right not to be offended'

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Garden of Frognal
    Image caption: Baroness Garden of Frognal

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Garden of Frognal says there is "no right not to be offended."

    She says if students only discuss ideas with which they agree, their university education "would not have served them well." 

  60. Question on Syria vote date

    Business Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Leader of the House Chris Bryant presses Chris Grayling on the date of the vote on air strikes in Syria. 

    The Prime Minister indicated in his statement he would like to see the debate and vote next week, Mr Bryant says.

    "It would be wrong to keep members in the dark" about when the debate will take place, he says, and calls on the Leader of the House to set out the date for the vote as soon as possible. 

  61. Commons business statement begins

    Business Statement

    Chris Grayling
    Image caption: Chris Grayling sets out Commons business for the next two weeks
  62. End of statement

    Syria Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After a mammoth debate that saw 103 backbenchers question the Prime Minister, the Syria statement is finally over, and MPs move to the business statement. 

  63. 'Thanks for the exercise'

    Syria Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After  trying to catch the speaker's eye through standing up and sitting down for the best part of two and a half hours, DUP MP Ian Paisley Jr sarcastically thanks the speaker "for the exercise."

    He asks the Prime Minster for more detail on the seven terror plots he said the security services had foiled on UK territory this year.

    David Cameron says he "has to be careful" what he says, and so gives scant details on the plots. 

  64. University free speech - Calls to ban Germaine Greer lecture over trans comments

    From the BBC News Website - 23 October

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A petition has been launched asking Cardiff University to cancel a lecture by Germaine Greer, saying her views are "problematic" for transgender people.

    The author is due to speak on 18 November in a lecture called Women & Power: The Lessons of the 20th Century.

    Students' union women's officer Rachel Melhuish said Ms Greer's views towards transgender women are "misogynistic".

    The university's vice-chancellor, Prof Colin Riordan, said: "We are committed to freedom of speech and open debate."

    Read more here.

  65. Free speech 'under attack' in universities

    Free speech debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Deech
    Image caption: Baroness Deech

    Crossbench peer Baroness Deech is introducing a debate on free speech in universities.

    She says that "free speech is under attack because of a widespread culture of victimisation and grievance."

    The motion reads "this House takes note of the protection of freedom of speech in universities." 

  66. Refugees strategy

    Syria Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    If increased bombing leads to an increase in refugees fleeing Syria, "will the Prime minister review the number of refugees accepted to the UK", Labour MP Albert Owen asks.

    David Cameron says the refugees strategy is "kept under review" and that he will listen to arguments if the circumstances change.

    But, he warns, "we need to get on and deliver" what the government promised. 

    Albert Owen
  67. Likelihood of ceasefire questionsed

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP George Kerevan asks what "the likelihood of a ceasefire" is between forces in Syria, other than Islamic State.

    "The Vienna process is supposed to deliver that sort of ceasefire," David Cameron says. 

  68. Syria airstrikes 'wholly different' from Iraq war

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Deben
    Image caption: Lord Deben

    Conservative peer Lord Deben recalls that he was one of the few Conservatives who voted against the Iraq war in 2003, but says this situation is "wholly different from that very foolish occurrence", before adding: 

    Quote Message: This is a situation, in fact, in which we ought to support our allies, we ought to accept we are involved and we ought to accept that our people are in fact threatened."
  69. 'Redrawing the map'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP David Anderson suggests that countries intervening in the region might end up "redrawing the map" in order to "create a Sunni state in northern Iraq and northern Syria".

    "I hope that isn't necessary," the prime minister says, calling such proposals "a counsel of despair".

  70. 'Feeding the evil'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Mark Durkan says that arguments against intervening as an ally of President Assad "for many of us, also persuade us against the intervention on the terms that [the prime minister] is commending as well".

    He adds: "We do not want to be any part of feeding the evil that we want to be defeating."

    David Cameron argues that, if the UK does not take action against Islamic State, "we shouldn't be surprised when it grows and threatens us more".

  71. 'Appropriate troops'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Keir Starmer

    Labour MP Sir Keir Starmer says "we all share the objective of defeating ISIS" but questions whether air strikes without ground troops "can realistically achieve that objective".

    He asks if the UK's allies share the view that the 70,000 opposition troops the prime minister mentioned are "the appropriate troops to take the ground" and how they can be protected "without getting into conflict with Russia".

    David Cameron says allies such as the United States back the forces on the ground in Syria.

  72. A fractured peace

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Ashdown says the "diplomatic track" is "at last being followed", referring to international talks being held in Vienna on the future of Syria.

    He says this will "not be a comfortable peace, it will be a fractured peace", but even so that would "be good enough for me."

  73. "Ideological response"

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Archbishop of Canterbury
    Image caption: The Archbishop of Canterbury

    The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev, Justin Welby says there must be an "ideological response" to the "doctrines which draw so many people to support Isis internationally."

    Baroness Stowell replies that in the UK there is the government's anti-extremism strategy, and internationally the UK is trying to address online extremism with internet companies and other countries.

  74. Conservative changes mind on military action

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Two years ago I was opposed to military action in Syria," says Conservative MP Andrew Bingham.

    However, he says that the "atrocities that took place in Paris" and the prime minister's arguments have convinced him to support action.

    MPs rejected possible UK military action in Syria in 2013.

    Andrew Bingham
  75. Co-ordination with Russia

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Stowell says that there is aircraft co-ordination with Russia in place over Syria

  76. Air strikes have "resounding" legal backing

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Stowell
    Image caption: Baroness Stowell

    Leader of the Lords Baroness Stowell says the UN resolution passed last week gives "resounding" legal backing to air strikes.

    She says that "absolutely" there is evidence that air strikes are an effective way of fighting IS.

  77. Lib Dems reassured about the legality of airstrikes

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Wallace says military action must never be used as a gesture, and must be measured by their likely effectiveness.

    He says the government's response to the Defence Select Committee is "reassuring" about the legality of air strikes in Syria.

  78. 'Crucial that Iran is round the table'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    PM in the Commons

    The prime minister says it is essential Iran is involved in talks in Vienna aiming to reach a political solution in Syria.

    Quote Message: It is crucial that they are round the table for this Vienna process."
  79. Labour respons to Syria statement

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Smith
    Image caption: Baroness Smith

    Shadow leader of the lords Baroness Smith says labour has always been willing to use military force when necessary, citing the example of Sierra Leone.

    She argues "there is not just a war to be won, but also a peace to be won."

    She asks for more details on what the political solution to the situation in Syria, particularly concerning the role of Assad.

  80. Still going strong

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons chamber
    Image caption: One hour and forty minutes in, there is no shortage of MPs hoping to speak
  81. 'Co-operate with Russia and Assad'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Edward Leigh says that a "rag tag" army on the ground, such as the Free Syrian Army, is not going take Islamic state territory.

    "We have to co-operate with Russia and with Assad," he says.

    David Cameron denies he is "overplaying" the role of the Free Syrian Army and Kurdish forces but claims they would be strengthened by a political settlement.

    The PM says co-operation with Assad is not "practical" and claims Syria's president "has been something of a recruiting sergeant for ISIL".

  82. Repeat of Syria statement

    Syria statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    RAF Tornado jet
    Image caption: A vote on extending airstrikes to Syria is expected in the near future

    Baroness Stowell of Beston is repeating the statement made by David Cameron in the Commons.

    David Cameron said air strikes against Islamic state militants in Syria would be in the UK's "national interest".

    The prime minister denied claims it would make the UK a bigger target for terror attacks.

    He told MPs the UK was already a target for IS and the only way to deal with that was to "take action" now.

    Read more about the statement here.

  83. Pic: David Cameron

    Syria statement

    David Cameron
    Image caption: The prime minister responds to MPs' questions
  84. Diplomatic efforts 'compromised'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Green Party MP Caroline Lucas argues that diplomatic efforts to secure a political transition in Syria will be "compromised if we join the bombing".

    David Cameron says he thinks military action makes a settlement "more likely", adding that if Islamic State is not defeated, "we won't have a Syria to have a transition in".

  85. Turkey releases audio of 'warning' to downed Russia jet

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Turkish military has released an audio recording of what it says were warnings to a Russian warplane before it was shot down on the Syrian border.

    "Change your heading south immediately," a voice apparently says in English. Turkey said it had tried to rescue the SU-24 bomber's two pilots.

    One of them was killed by gunfire as he parachuted from the burning plane.

    Read more here.

  86. Downing of a Russian war plane "deeply concerning"

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Helic
    Image caption: Baroness Helic

    Conservative Baroness Helic asks what implications the shooting down of the Russian plane by Turkish forces has for UK security strategy .

    Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay says the incident is "deeply concerning."

    She adds that the fight against the so-called Islamic state must be "full spectrum" and that there is a role for Nato in this.

  87. 'Examine his conscience'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru MP Hywel Williams says his party voted against the Iraq War as "a matter of integrity".

    He urges the prime minister to "examine his conscience and examine all choices short of bombing".

  88. 'Likely to increase recruits to terrorism'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Paul Flynn claims Islamic state wants to "escalate a regional war into a world war between Christians and Muslims".

    He suggests military action in Syria is "likely to increase recruits to terrorism and jihadism" in the UK.

    David Cameron says Islamic State "have taken action against us already".

    He adds that a "battle between Muslims and Christians" is "what we want to avoid".

  89. Identity cards

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Campbell-Savours
    Image caption: Lord Campbell-Savours

    Labour peer Lord Campbell-Savours asks if the government is considering introducing national identity cards.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says "the government has no plans to introduce identity cards."

    Lord Campbell Savours says he is "sorry to hear that." He says they could keep the UK more secure.

    Lord Bates replies that ID cards would be expensive to run and ineffective. He points out that The UK does have forms of photographic identification, including passports and driving licences.

  90. 'Lessons' of Iraq

    Syria statement

    David Cameron says he is "determined we learn the lessons" of the Iraq war, but military action is necessary "when we're threatened".

    Fellow Conservative Cheryl Gillan says MPs were asked to vote in favour of invading Iraq in 2003 "on a false premise".

    The prime minister says the Iraq war "did poison the well in many ways" but it should not "hold us back from taking correct decisions".

  91. 'Against ISIL and nobody else'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    DUP Westminster leader Nigel Dodds says his party knows "the consequences of appeasing and indulging terrorism for too long".

    Military action, he says, should be "against ISIL terrorists and nobody else".

    He is also concerned that "there is an endpoint" for the action, but says "we must act" to protect the UK's national security.

  92. Food banks

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Beecham asks if the government has considered why NHS hospitals are opening food banks on their premises.

    Minister Lord Prior says we have a "welfare safety net" in this country, but some people will always fall through the gaps.

    He said we should be pleased that there are voluntary organisations who help these vulnerable people.

  93. 'There are no moderates'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Peter Lilley claims "there are no moderates" in the Syrian conflict.

    David Cameron insists there are moderates and "they have taken the fight to ISIL".

    The PM says most Syrians "are not massive fans of Assad or psychopathic, Islamist extremist killers".

  94. 'Safe havens'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron asks what role would "Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Qatar and other Gulf states play" in the international action on Syria.

    He adds that "no amount of aid can help an innocent family dodge a bomb" and says the strategy does not contain plans for "no bomb zones" or "safe havens".

    David Cameron claims the Gulf states "have, on the whole, been helping to fund the moderate opposition".

    He hopes that a cease fire will succeed, meaning there will not be a need for "no bomb zones".

  95. Super-fast broadband delivery is "challenging"

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe
    Image caption: Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Conservative Lord Holmes asks when 100 per cent of the United Kingdom population will be able to access reliable super-fast broadband.

    Culture, Media and Sport Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe says delivering super-fast broadband to rural areas is "challenging."

    She says that by 2020 a designated provider will be "required" to supply remote areas.

    Non-affiliated peer Lord Sugar says there is not enough "return on investment" in rural areas to make a profit, and asks if that means other consumers will be subsiding rural users.

    The Minister replies that the government will look at various options "including an industry cost sharing mechanism."

  96. 'ISIL-first strategy'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Committee chairman Julian Lewis says the idea there are "credible" ground forces in Syria "is a revelation to me".

    If Syria's President Assad does not go, the Conservative MP asks, would the PM prefer "Syria under him or the continued existence and expansion of ISIL/Daesh"?

    David Cameron says there should be "an ISIL-first strategy" as the group is "the greater threat to the United Kingdom".

  97. Committee report and PM's response

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Foreign Affairs Committee report set out a number of tests it said should be met before air strikes were considered.

    The committee said there should be no military intervention without a "coherent international strategy" on tackling IS and ending Syria's civil war.

    Read David Cameron's response to the Foreign Affairs Committee's report here.

  98. Conservative peer introduced

    Lords introductions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hague of Richmond
    Image caption: Lord Hague of Richmond

    Conservative Lord Hague of Richmond is being introduced to the House of Lords.

    William Hague was MP for Richmond from February 1989 to March 2015, and leader of the Conservative Party from 1997 to 2001. 

    He served as foreign secretary from May 2010 to July 2014, and leader of the House of Commons from July 2014 to May 2015.

  99. David Cameron warned against Syria vote by Commons committee

    From the BBC News website, 3 November 2015

    Fighter aircraft

    An influential Commons committee has urged David Cameron not to press ahead with a vote on UK air strikes against Islamic State militants in Syria.

    The Foreign Affairs Committee - which has a Conservative majority - said the prime minister should instead focus on efforts to end Syria's civil war.

    It also raised concerns about the legal basis for any UK action.

    Downing Street has strongly denied reports Mr Cameron has abandoned plans for a vote altogether.

    Read more.

  100. Reconstruction costs

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angus Robertson asks what the costs of reconstruction in Syria are likely to be.

    He also points out that the PM previously "asked us to bomb the opponents of Daesh" in a Commons vote in 2013.

    That action would "probably have strengthened" Islamic State, the SNP Westminster leader argues.

    He says that, unless questions on the political process, ground troops and reconstruction are answered, "the SNP will not back air strikes".

  101. Lib Dem peer introduced

    Lords introductions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Featherstone
    Image caption: Baroness Featherstone

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Featherstone is being introduced to the House of Lords.

    Lynne Featherstone was MP for Hornsey and Wood Green between 2005 and 2015.

    She served as a minister in the Home Office from November 2014 to May 2015.

  102. 'Agree a ceasefire in Syria'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson condemns both Islamic State, or Daesh, and the Assad regime.

    He says "the SNP strongly supports" an international initiative "to agree a ceasefire in Syria".

    He asks how the UK is supporting the initiative.

  103. 'Get the politics right'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP and Foreign Affairs Committee chairman Crispin Blunt responds to the PM's statement.

    Mr Blunt asks David Cameron if he agrees with "senior leaders" in the region that "getting the politics right" is essential.

    He calls on David Cameron to give evidence to the committee "in about two months' time" on the strategy he has outlined to MPs.

    The PM indicates he is "very happy" to address the Commons or the committee.

  104. PM rules out ground troops

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron tells Jeremy Corbyn that the UK will not deploy ground troops in Syria.

  105. 'Rule out UK ground forces'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn asks whether the Free Syrian Army would be able to hold territory vacated by Islamic State, or whether other "jihadist and radical salafist forces" would step in.

    He also says UK military action could lead to "mission creep and boots on the ground" and calls on the PM to "rule out the deployment of British ground forces".

    Finally, the Labour leader asks about likely civilian casualties and the impact on the refugee crisis.

  106. Lords business today

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our coverage of the House of Lords.

    The day begins with the introductions of Baroness Featherstone and Lord Hague of Richmond.

    There will then be questions on super-fast broadband, food banks, Turkish forces shooting down a Russian war plane, and national identity cards.

    The main business will be debates on free speech in universities, community cohesion and counter-terrorism, and creating a healthy society.

  107. 'A threat to our own people'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says Islamic State has brought "a reign of terror" to Syria, Iraq and Libya.

    He adds:

    Quote Message: There is not doubt that it poses a threat to our own people."
  108. No vote without 'clear majority'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron does not give a precise indication of when he wants to bring a motion on military action to the Commons.

    Quote Message: There will not be a vote in this House unless there's a clear majority for action, because we will not hand a publicity coup to ISIL."
  109. 'Assad must go'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron says that what he calls "moderate forces will be crucial to Syria's future".

    The PM tells the House his "expert advice" says "we will not beat ISIL if we waver in our view that Assad must go".

  110. 'Not dismantling Syrian state'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "We are not in the business of dismantling the Syrian state or its institutions," the prime minister says.

    He says the UK and its allies are committed to preserving Syria and allowing a "new representative government".

  111. 'Ground troops'

    Syria statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The prime minister says that ground forces in Syria include up to "70,000 Syrian opposition fighters" such as the Free Syrian Army and also Kurdish fighters.

  112. 'Force may legally be used in self-defence'

    Syria statement