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Summary

  1. The day in the Commons began with Northern Ireland questions.
  2. That was followed by questions to the prime minister.
  3. Then the chancellor unveiled his autumn statement and comprehensive spending review.
  4. In the Lords there were questions on domestic violence, before peers moved on to debate the Enterprise Bill.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies, Aiden James and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lords draws to a close for the day.

    They meet again at 11:00 GMT tomorrow, when Baroness Featherstone and Lord Hague of Richmond will be introduced. 

    There will then be questions on super-fast broadband, food banks, identity cards, and the shooting down of a Russian warplane by Turkish forces.

    This will be followed by debates on free speech at universities, community relations and counter-terrorism, and making the population more healthy. 

  2. Amendment withdrawn

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Earl Lytton
    Image caption: Earl Lytton

    Speaking for the government, Baroness Neville-Rolfe says the reforms promote "full and early engagement" during business rates appeals.

    She asks that the amendments are withdrawn.

    Earl Lytton withdraws the amendment, "with great reluctance." 

  3. Business rates appeals

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The crossbencher Earl Lytton is moving a group of amendments to clause six of the bill, which concerns business rates appeals.

    Business rates are charged to retailers based on the value of their shop or other commercial property.  

    The Business Rates Administration Review discussion paper (2014) found that too many business rate appeals are made with little supporting evidence, and take too long to resolve. 

    Clause six aims to broaden existing powers to ensure secondary legislation can be made to introduce a reformed appeals system. 

  4. Amendment 62 withdrawn

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Speaking for the government, Baroness Neville-Rolfe says they have "some sympathy" with amendment 62.

    She says will "explore" the issues it raises, but asks that it is withdrawn for now.

    Lord Flight, who moved the amendments, withdraws them.

  5. Late claims

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hayter
    Image caption: Baroness Hayter

    Speaking for the opposition, Baroness Hayter says Labour will not support the insurance amendments.

    The amendments are to clause five of the bill, which deals with late payment of insurance claims.

    Baroness Hayter says the amendments would "disadvantage claimants."

  6. Next amendments

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Baroness Sharp says she appreciates that the government has done work in the area of employing diverse apprentices.

    She asks that minister continue to "press" public authorities to encourage a diverse range of apprentices, and withdraws the amendment.

    Conservative Lord Flight speaks to the next amendments, which apply to insurers. 

  7. Apprenticeship targets

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are now debating amendment 58, which would specify that a proportion of apprenticeship targets would be reserved for young people leaving care and young people with physical and learning disabilities.

    Lib Dem peers Baroness Sharp and Lord Stoneham have tabled the amendment.

    Minister Baroness Rolfe says it is important "we do not deter employers" from taking on apprentices.

    "Employers have to make a final decision about who they hire," she argues, and opposes "ringfencing" certain apprenticeships. 

  8. Apprenticeships for subcontractors

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Sharp
    Image caption: Baroness Sharp

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Sharp of Guildford is introducing Amendment 57.

    The amendment is part of a group and would allow a public body to set a target for how many apprenticeships its subcontractors should offer.

  9. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's it from the House of Commons for today.

    MPs meet at 09.30 GMT tomorrow for questions to the attorney general and the minister for women and equalities.

    There will also be a backbench business debate on the final report of the Airports Commission.

    Meanwhile tonight, the House of Lords continues its deliberations on the Enterprise Bill.

  10. Amendment 55 rejected

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers vote against amendment number 55 by 107 votes to 71, a majority of 36.

    They now move on to debate amendment 57. 

  11. UN convention 'does not apply'

    Adjournment debate

    Minister Justin Tomlinson says the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea does not apply in Stephen O'Malley's case, meaning the "UK government does not have jurisdiction in this case".

    This is because the ship Mr O'Malley was diving from was being used as a diving platform and he was not working on something directly connected to the ship, meaning the Health and Safety Executive has no power to investigate.

    If he had been working on the ship's hull, the convention would apply, says Mr Tomlinson.

    "The family could pursue this privately" through the Danish legal system, he adds.

    Justin Tomlinson
  12. Division

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have divided on amendment 55 of the Enterprise Bill.

    The amendment would require public bodies to offer more high skill apprenticeships.

  13. Differing versions of the cause of death

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Louise Ellman says Stephen O'Malley was working in Germany for a Danish employer.

    The MP tells the House that authorities in Denmark said he had died of an undiagnosed heart condition, which a coroner described as "fanciful in the extreme".

    It is more likely Mr O'Malley died of a cardiac arrest caused by hypoxia as a result of his neck seal being too tight, Mrs Ellman says. 

  14. Death of Stephen O'Malley

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Louise Ellman

    Louise Ellman, the Labour MP for Liverpool Riverside, is making a speech on safety in deep sea diving and the death of Stephen O'Malley.

    Mr O'Malley, from Bebington, Merseyside, died during a dive at an offshore wind farm in Germany.

    Mrs Ellman says he was "on a routine dive" from which he did not return alive. During the dive Mr O'Malley made a distress call to say his neck dam was too tight.

    She holds up a neck dam, which is designed to fit closely around a diver's neck.

  15. Provisions on apprenticeships

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Mendelsohn
    Image caption: Lord Mendelsohn

    Peers have moved on to amending part four of the bill.

    This clause isintended to protect the reputation of training providers, employers who offer statutory apprenticeships and apprentices who join those apprenticeships, by helping to ensure that statutory apprenticeships are not confused with lower quality training.  

    It includes a provision to allow the government to set public bodies targets for the number of apprenticeships they offer.

    Labour's Lord Mendelsohn is introducing an amendment which would specify that some of those apprenticeships must be “in high quality and high level skill apprenticeships”.    

  16. Bill clears second reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Childcare Bill passes second reading, meaning it will be considered in detail by a committee of MPs.

    After MPs have presented petitions on behalf of their constituents, Labour MP Louise Ellman opens the adjournment debate. 

  17. Minister closes the debate

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sam Gyimah

    "This government has made a strategic decision to invest in early years and in childcare," says Education Minister Sam Gyimah.

    He responds to SNP calls for the government to guarantee 30 hours of childcare for all children.

    The first 15 hours of the provision in England is "universal", Mr Gyimah says, and the "second 15 hours allows parents to work more hours". 

  18. "Drafting error"

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Curry
    Image caption: Lord Curry

    The government amendments pass unopposed, and peers move on to amendment 39, tabled by crossbench peer Lord Curry.

    The amendment corrects what he describes as a "drafting error."

    The government supports the amendment and it passes unopposed.

  19. Regulatory information to be published

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Labour amendments are withdrawn, and peers move on to a group of government amendments.

    These amendments require regulators to publish the information they give to the government relating to the business impact target.

    Minster Baroness Neville-Rolfe says this will make the process more transparent. 

  20. 'This is an economic bill'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Pat Glass

    Shadow education minister Pat Glass asks how the policy to provide up to 30 hours' childcare per week "will work in practice and how it will be properly funded".

    She says the Childcare Bill "is in fact an economic bill", which is "targeted first and foremost at getting parents, especially mothers, back into work". 

    She adds:

    Quote Message: Whilst there's nothing wrong with that, it does not put the child at the centre of this bill and given the massive funding gap, there are serious concerns that quality will be the first casualty of this policy, capacity being the second."
  21. Amendments to clause two

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Mendelsohn is introducing a group of amendments to clause two of the bill.

    Clause two requires the government to publish a "business impact target" every Parliament. This will detail the economic impact of new legislation on business, voluntary and community bodies.

    The amendments clarify what type of regulations will be considered in the report.

  22. Autumn statement: the percentages

    Visual Journalism, BBC News

    Graphic
  23. 'What are they going to do in the summer?'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Emily Thornberry criticises the bill's provision of childcare for only 38 weeks of the year.

    "What are they going to do in the summer?" she asks.

  24. Amendments withdrawn

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe
    Image caption: Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Responding to the amendments, Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe says powers to fine would undermine the legislation, and encourage large firms to hire lawyers to fight them.

    She says the Federation of Small Businesses agrees.

    She says the government is "content" with the approach in the bill and asks that the amendments are withdrawn.

    Peers agree and the amendments are withdrawn.

  25. Punishment for late payments

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Stoneham
    Image caption: Lord Stoneham

    Liberal Democrat Lord Stoneham of Droxford is moving two amendments which would give more power to the small business commissioner. 

    Amendment 11 would allow the commissioner to request the government fine large businesses which consistently pay small businesses late.

    Amendment 15 would allow the commissioner to charge interest on late payments by large businesses to small businesses.

  26. 'Highest child care costs in the EU'

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lucy Frazer

    Conservative MP Lucy Frazer says the UK has "the highest child care costs in the EU".

    She adds that women who "take long-term breaks" from work are more likely to remain on low pay, and the bill will give them the opportunity to return to work sooner if they choose.

  27. About the bill

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Childcare Bill provides for an increased entitlement to 30 hours a week of free childcare to be made available to eligible working parents of three and four year olds.

    It also requires local authorities to publish information about the provision of childcare in the local authority area, and other services or facilities which might be of benefit to parents or prospective parents, or children or young persons in their area.

    The bill applies to England only, with education a devolved matter in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

  28. Government amendments pass

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Business Minister Baroness Neville Rolfe is moving a set of amendments for the government.

    The amendments clarify the role of the small business commissioner. Among other things, they allow the commissioner to appoint staff.

    They are passed without opposition.

  29. Amendment 1 narrowly defeated

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted to reject amendment 1 to the Enterprise Bill at report stage by 204 votes to 201, a majority of only 3.

    Division result
  30. The amendment

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are voting on amendment 1 to the Enterprise Bill at report stage.

    Amendment 1 would broaden and strengthen the powers of the small business commissioner to matters in connection with the supply of goods and services to larger businesses and local authorities, and to make recommendations.

    The full text of the bill as amended at committee stage can be found here and the list of amendments being moved today at report stage can be found here.

    The result of the division is expected at 17:20 GMT.

  31. Division in the Lords

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Burt responds to the minister by saying that there are "strong feelings" on her party's benches over the issues covered in her amendments and so decides to test the opinion of the House and a division is called.

  32. 'Follow the Scottish government's plan'

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Carol Monaghan

    SNP education spokesperson Carol Monaghan makes a speech on the Childcare Bill, which applies to England only.

    She urges ministers to "follow the Scottish government's ambitious plan to provide 30 hours' childcare" for all children".

  33. 'Funding should not be top-sliced'

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Maria Miller, who chairs the Commons Women and Equalities Committee, says childcare will be provided "predominantly" by private companies.

    She says funding should "take the reality of business life for these providers into account", adding that it should not be  "top-sliced by local authorities" for other purposes.

  34. 'The sunshine of transparency'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe is responding to the debate on this group of amendments for the government.

    She says that the creation of a small business commissioner was a manifesto pledge that the government is keen to introduce, and says that government has "arrived at this policy architecture after careful consideration of the issues".

    The Business Innovation and Skills minister says that the policy "brings the sunshine of transparency to the problem".

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe
  35. 'Government has no clear policy'

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lucy Powell concludes her remarks by saying "I want this policy to be a success I look forward to working with the government on this".

    The shadow secretary also says the government has "no clear policy on childcare" and asks the secretary of state to "come back with an over-arching strategy".

    "It is the secretary of state's responsibility to satisfy people that this plan for childcare is deliverable, sustainable and affordable", she says.

  36. Small business commissioner

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Burt
    Image caption: Baroness Burt

    Peers are debating a set of amendments related to the creation of a "small business commissioner", which is mandated in clause one of the bill.

    The commissioner will assist small businesses in payment disputes with larger businesses, a problem estimated to cost small businesses around £26.8bn per year.  

    The amendments, introduced by the Liberal Democrat Baroness Burt, would strengthen the role of the commissioner, mandating them to be able to help small businesses deal with the public sector and other small business as well.

  37. Report Stage debate begins

    Enterprise Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have moved on to debate the first day of the report stage of the Enterprise Bill

  38. The reality 'tells a different story'

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lucy Powell

    Shadow Education Secretary Lucy Powell rises to support the bill and reminds the House of the achievements of past Labour government's on childcare.

    Ms Powell attacks the record of the government and its predecessor on childcare, saying that "for all her [Nicky Morgan's] trumpeting of government achievements on childcare, the reality tells a different story".

    "The story of the last parliament by the government is one of reducing support for working families, childcare going up and the gender pay gap remaining stuck for the first time in 15 years", she says.

  39. 'On the side of working parents'

    Childcare bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nicky Morgan finishes her remarks by saying that this bill shows that the Conservatives are the party of working people and are on the side of working parents

    The education secretary says "we are pushing forward with this legislation to give people the help they need as quickly as possible".

    "It should be supported from all sides of the House", she says.

  40. What is second reading?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Whilst at the first reading in both the Commons and the Lords the title of the bill is read out, second reading is an opportunity for MPs to debate the main principles of a bill.  

    Legislation can be introduced in either of the two Houses of Parliament by representatives of the department responsible for the bill.

    At the end of the debate the Commons decides whether or not the bill should proceed to the next stage.

    If the Commons votes against the bill at second reading the legislation can progress no further.

    If the bill is passed at second reading the legislation moves on to committee stage.

  41. Cost of Tax credit changes

    Autumn statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Campbell-Savours asks if the cost of dropping the tax credit changes will result in additional benefit cuts in other areas.

    Lord O'Neill says the move away from tax credits towards Universal Credit over the course of the Parliament, plus savings from other policies "that were there in any case and that have been announced today" will cover the cost. 

    Read more about Universal Credit here.

  42. Labour support for the bill

    Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The education secretary indicates her thanks to the Labour frontbench team for their support for the bill.

    Ms Morgan says that the government has listened to consultation on this issue and says "this government will provide more support than any other in history".

    Nicky Morgan
    Lucy Powell
    Image caption: Shadow Education Secretary Lucy Powell nods in support of the bill.
  43. Commons library briefing on the bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    An in-depth explanation and analysis of the bill by the independent experts of the House of Commons Library can be found here.

  44. Second reading of the Childcare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Education Secretary Nicky Morgan is now moving the Childcare Bill at second reading in the House of Commons.

    The bill has already cleared all legislative stages in the House of Lords.

    The bill aims to deliver on a commitment on free childcare in the Conservatives' election manifesto and applies to England only.

    Families in which both parents are working would be entitled to 30 hours a week of free childcare.

    The entitlement  would apply to three- and four-year-olds for 38 weeks of the year.

    Nicky Morgan
  45. The Lords rejected changes to tax credits last month

    From the BBC News website - 26th October

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The government has been dealt a major blow after the House of Lords voted to delay tax credit cuts and to compensate those affected in full.

    Peers voted by 289 votes to 272 to provide full financial redress to the millions of recipients affected.

    They earlier inflicted a second defeat by backing a pause until an independent study of the impact was carried out.

    George Osborne said he would heed the outcome of the vote, but said it raised "constitutional issues".

    Read more here.

  46. Lords not responsible for tax credit change

    Autumn statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord O'Neill
    Image caption: Lord O'Neill

    Treasury Minister Lord O'Neill responds to the questions on the autumn statement.

    He says the statement contained "real terms" protection for the NHS, and extra support for science and innovation.

    He says that the chancellor was already considering altering the planned tax credit changes before the House of Lords voted against them.

  47. Statement "less generous" than it appears

    Autumn statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Kramer
    Image caption: Baroness Kramer

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Kramer says the statement was "less generous" than it first appears, and still contains £12 billion of welfare cuts.

    She welcomes extra spending on mental health and infrastructure.

    She asks if the statement contained a cut in further education, and questions whether the change in the school funding formula will mean cuts to London schools.

  48. 'Crumbs from the table'

    Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr MacNeil is citing the example of the relationship between Denmark and the Faroe Islands as how devolution should be settled.

    "Instead of crumbs from the tables let's open the door to the larder", Mr MacNeil says.

  49. Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP's Angus MacNeil is now moving the Scotland Act 1998 (Amendment) Bill under the ten minute rule.

    The text of Mr MacNeil's motion is as follows:

    Quote Message: That leave be given to bring in a Bill to establish a mechanism by which the Scottish Government, Scottish Parliament and a majority of Members representing Scottish constituencies may jointly determine further powers and responsibilities to be devolved to Scotland; and for connected purposes."
    Angus MacNeil
  50. MPs 'can have a cup of tea'

    Autumn statement ends

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker John Bercow thanks MPs taking part in questions on the autumn statement.

    Quote Message: Three hours and ten minutes later, subject to their other commitments, they can have a cup of tea."
    John Bercow
  51. Last but not least

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim Shannon
    Image caption: DUP MP and veteran debater Jim Shannon asks the last question of the debate on the Autumn Statement. Mr Shannon asks for extra funding to support STI treatment centres in the run up to world AIDS day.
  52. Repeat of the autumn statement

    Autumn statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    pound coin

    Peers are debating the Chancellor's autumn statement.

    Speaking for the opposition, Lord Davies of Oldham says "the government has jettisoned the long-term economic plan."

    He highlights "two significant climbdowns" ,no cuts to the police force and abandoning the planned cuts to tax credits. 

  53. 'Two child policy'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alison Thewlis

    SNP MP Alison Thewlis asks the chancellor "how he intends to make women prove that they had their third child as a result of rape" as "the two child policy still applies, despite his u-turn on tax credit cuts".

    Proposals will be in the Welfare Reform Bill, George Osborne says.

  54. Cinema ad snub 'bewilders' Church of England

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Church of England has said it is "disappointed and bewildered" by the refusal of leading UK cinemas to show an advert featuring the Lord's Prayer.

    The Church called the decision "plain silly" and warned it could have a "chilling" effect on free speech.

    It had hoped the 60-second film would be screened UK-wide before Christmas ahead of the new Star Wars film.

    The agency that handles adverts for the cinemas said it could offend those of "differing faiths and no faith".

    Read more here.

  55. Church adverts in the cinema

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Rt Rev Stephen Cottrell, the Bishop of Chelmsford  asks if the government thinks the recent decision by Digital Cinema Media not to accept advertisements from the Church of England has implications for religious freedom.

    Local Government Minister Baroness Trafford says "the government does not agree with that decision, and has urged the cinema to think again."

    She adds the government "wholeheartedly supports the freedom of expression and supports faith and faith institutions."

  56. Syria 'reconstruction'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Roger Mullin asks what resources will be made available for "reconstruction in Syria".

    George Osborne tells him that "50% of our overseas budget will be going to those fragile and failing states in the world".

  57. Still going strong

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne
    Image caption: The chancellor has been at the despatch box for nearly three hours now and there are still several MPs waiting to question him.
  58. Women with HIV

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Gould
    Image caption: Baroness Gould

    Labour's Baroness Gould of Potternewton asks what the government has done to assist women with HIV who are experiencing gender-based violence.

    Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton says women in this situation are "extremely vulnerable." He says the government is working to remove the stigma they suffer when raising the issue with the authorities.

  59. Arts in the north

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Diana Johnson
    Image caption: Kingston upon Hull MP Diana Johnson welcomes the funding of £1 million for Hull City of Culture 2017 but references several highly funded arts projects in London, asking the chancellor to "think again about what the northern powerhouse really means".
  60. Is a national advisor on domestic violence needed?

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Gale
    Image caption: Baroness Gale

    Labour peer Baroness Gale asks if the government is considering appointing a national adviser for violence against women, domestic abuse and sexual violence.

    Home Office minister Lord Bates says Karen Bradley has been appointed minister for the prevention of abuse and exploitation in the Home Office, and she takes a lead on these issues.

  61. 'Tax on lads' mags'?

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cat Smith

    Labour MP Cat Smith is not entirely impressed by the plan to spend VAT proceeds from sanitary products on domestic violence projects and women's health charities.

    She suggests that women have "gone from paying a luxury tax to effectively an insurance payment if they ever have to flee violence".

    She wonders if there should there be "a tax on lads' mags to pay for prostate cancer".

    George Osborne says the government was unable to change EU rules on VAT but suggests that Ms Smith "comes forward with some good causes" on which to spend the proceeds.

  62. Police spending welcomed

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Can I welcome warmly the excellent news that the police budget will be protected in real terms," Conservative James Berry says.

    He adds that this would not be possible if "difficult decisions are not made about public spending elsewhere", which gives the chancellor another opportunity to attack Labour.

    George Osborne says he hasn't had "an answer to my challenge to the Labour Party" to suggest public spending reductions.

    Quote Message: Why doesn't the Labour Party sort out its policies, then come to the House of Commons and tell us what they are?"
  63. Violence against women vigils call for end to abuse

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A candlelit vigil will be held at the Senedd in Cardiff at dusk, calling for an end to violence against women.

    Earlier on Wednesday, Public Services Minister Leighton Andrews lit a candle of remembrance for silent victims of domestic abuse, at Llandaff Cathedral.

    The events mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and White Ribbon Day.

    By wearing a white ribbon, men pledge never to commit, condone or remain silent about violence against women.

    Read more here.

  64. Domestic violence

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Prosser
    Image caption: Baroness Prosser

    Labour's Baroness Prosser asks what is being done to reduce the number of women killed by partners, ex-partners or family members and the incidence of domestic abuse.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says the government is committed to tackling domestic abuse.

    He adds that most domestic murders could be prevented by early intervention, and police procedures are being changed to reflect this.

  65. 'Personal betrayal'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Wes Streeting

    Labour MP Wes Streeting says he and financial journalist Martin Lewis were asked by the coalition government "to lead an independent campaign on student finance information".

    Now, he says, "Not only are student repayment conditions being changed in a regressive way, but they are being applied retrospectively."

    Mr Streeting regards this as a "personal betrayal" and asks how anyone applying for finance can trust government information.

    George Osbourne resonds that "it was the Labour government that introduced tuition fees", adding that new funding from fees will "expand student places".

  66. Thanks for science spending pledge

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nicola Blackwood
    Image caption: The Science and Technology Committee Chair Nicola Blackwood thanks the chancellor for protecting science and innovation spending. She says this will "mean more high value jobs, higher productivity and more inward investment".
  67. A welcome u-turn

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jack Dromey
    Image caption: Former shadow home office minister Jack Dromey says on the decision not to cut police budgets "a u-turn however begrudged and however late is to be welcomed"
  68. Lords business today

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our coverage of the House of Lords.

    Peers begin with questions on domestic murders, the appointment of a national advisor on violence against women, women with HIV, and the decision by Digital Cinema Media not to accept advertisements from the Church of England.

    There will then be a repeat of the chancellors autumn statement, which was made earlier today in the Commons.

    The main business of the day will be the report stage of the Enterprise Bill.

  69. Deficit target 'overshot by £60bn'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Alison McGovern says the chancellor was committed to eliminating the deficit but has "overshot that mark by £60bn".

    She asks George Osborne if he expects to "preside over anything but a deficit".

    An irritated Mr Osbourne suggests that "every Labour MP who gets up should propose a cut in public spending before they propose an increase".

  70. 'Tampon tax'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to a question from Labour's Caroline Flint on the so-called "tampon tax", George Osborne says the government has "not been able to change the European Union rules" on VAT.

    VAT on sanitary products stands at 5% in the UK.

    The chancellor says using the proceeds to fund women's charities is the "best interim solution".

  71. Waiting in the wings

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs waiting to speak
    Image caption: Many backbenchers are still indicating that they wish to speak
  72. 'Little black book'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The DUP's Sammy Wilson says that unlike the shadow chancellor who wants to "push Britain in the country in the red", he would like to see the country "in the black" whilst holding up a book of his own.

    Mr Wilson tells the chamber "I'll not be reading anything from my wee black book mind you".

    The DUP member says that "growth is still unbalanced across the United Kingdom" and asks the chancellor what he is doing to stop Northern Ireland "falling behind".

    Sammy Wilson
  73. Welfare cap 'breached'

    Autumn statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chris Leslie

    Labour MP and former shadow chancellor Chris Leslie says George Osborne has breached his own welfare cap.

    Mr Osborne says spending will fall "below the welfare cap" in future years.

  74. MPs question chancellor

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welcome back to our live coverage as backbench MPs put questions on the Autumn statement to George Osborne.

  75. PMQs about to start

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Prime Minister's Questions is about to begin.

    Full coverage of PMQs and the Autumn Statement is available from BBC Politics Live here.

  76. Theresa Villiers at the despatch box

    Northern Ireland questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Theresa Villiers
  77. Implementing the Stormont House Agreement

    Northern Ireland questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Bob Blackman asks what is being done to implement the Stormont House Agreement in full.

    The agreement was reached with Northern Ireland's main political parties and the UK and Irish governments, but implementation stalled following disagreements over welfare, parades and flags.

    The recent Fresh Start agreement paved the way to the devolution of welfare powers but matters including dealing with the legacy of the troubles remain outstanding.

    Theresa Villiers says she will be meeting the Commissioner for Victims and Survivors to discuss ways to deal with Northern Ireland's past.

  78. Northern Ireland questions begin

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first question comes from Labour MP Mary Glindon, who asks what is being done to ensure Northern Ireland's financial position is sustainable.

    Secretary of state Theresa Villiers says financial sustainability is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Executive and the recent agreement between parties will help to ensure it.

    Mary Glindon welcomes the agreement.

  79. Today in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs meet from 11.30 GMT for Northern Ireland questions.

    At noon, Prime Minister David Cameron faces MPs in his weekly question session.

    The big event of the day is Chancellor George Osborne's Autumn Statement and the details of the government's spending review.

    After the chancellor has taken questions from MPs on the statement, SNP MP Angus MacNeil will introduce a ten minute rule bill to amend the Scotland Act.

    The day's legislation is the Childcare Bill at second reading - the first chance for MPs to debate the main principles of the bill.

    Finally, Labour MP Louise Ellman leads an adjournment debate on safety in deep sea diving.

  80. Committee adjourned

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Work and Pensions Select Committee has now adjourned.

    Our live coverage of the House of Commons will begin shortly before 11.30am.

    Our coverage of the day's select committees will return at 2.30pm with the environment, food and rural affairs committee taking evidence from leading supermarkets on farm gate prices. 

  81. Computers vs People

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Paul Lewis

    Conservative John Glen asks about the danger of creating a computerised system that apparently points to solutions for people but without clear individual advice could point towards the wrong outcomes.

    Mr Glen says "you could end up with something that superficially answers the question of communication but sends people down the wrong route".

    Mr Lewis responds that the only way that this could be done is with a team of specialist financial advisers who would then talk to everybody affected, and says "this would not happen".

    He says a computerised system "can work and it can be limited to the state pensions" but says such a system will not help everybody.

    "Clear communication from the department would be a start", he adds.

  82. Lack of communication

    Work and Pension Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sally West and Paul Lewis both say that the "biggest concern" they have with the new pension system is the "lack of communication" with the people affected.

    Ms West echoes the point made by Steve Webb that many people only found out about the changes to pensions age made in 1995 when the 2011 Act came into effect.

    Mr Lewis says that many women born between 1951 and 1959 have contacted him with an average notice of two and a half years for a change in pension age from 60 to 62, or in some cases to 66.

    Mr Lewis makes the point that many women of this age say they have had "no notice" of the changes to pension age that they are subject to.

  83. Next witnesses

    Work and Pensions Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Former minister Steve Webb finishes his contribution to the committee and the next set of witnesses take their seats.

    The committee is now hearing from Sally West, the Income and Poverty Strategy Adviser at Age UK and Paul Lewis from the BBC radio 4 programme Money Box.

    Sally West and Paul Lewis
  84. Who are the losers?

    Work and Pensions committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Heidi Allen

    Conservative MP Heidi Allen asks whether Steve Webb understands the concerns and anger of people, especially women of pensionable age affected by the changes.

    Steve Webb says that whilst he "completely understands" the "fury" of people in this group, he says that they think they are unique in being unfairly treated.

    "Unfairness depends on who you compare yourself with" he says.

    Mr Webb says that women in different age groups have just as much cause for anger and frustration.

    He also makes the point that  in 2010 men had to be three years older than women to get their pensions so "who is the aggrieved party here" he asks.

  85. 'Personalised communications'

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    SNP MP Mhairi Black asks Mr Webb whether the communication techniques used to notify people were the right ones.

    Steve Webb responds that he always felt that "personalised communication is the key" but says this was difficult to achieve with a limited budget and so the department decided to focus on a general message that "things are changing - find out".

    Mhairi Black
  86. Combating pensions confusion

    Work and Pensions Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Frank Field

    Committee chair Frank Field says that the most affected by the changes are women near retirement age and cites the example of several middle aged women in his constituency who have received contradictory communications from the DWP about their pensions.

    Mr Field asks what moves the government has been making to deal with this sort of confusion.  

    Mr Webb says it is "abundantly clear" that there is a group of people, predominantly women, who did not know about the changes to pensions in the 2011 Act, and some who did not know about the changes to pension age by the 1995 Act.

    The former minister says that the DWP made the decision to write to people personally to explain the changes but admits that they "will have missed some people".

  87. Three main objectives of the new system

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay starts the session by asking the former pensions minister Steve Webb what the main objectives of the new state pension are.

    Mr Webb says there were three main aims which were: a simpler system, improving outcomes for people who didn't do well under the current system, especially older women and the self employed, and lastly to make auto-enrollment work by reducing means testing.

    Steve Webb
    Image caption: Steve Webb - Pensions minister from 2010-15
  88. Work and Pensions Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Good morning and welcome back to our live coverage of the Houses of Parliament.

    We will shortly be going to the Work and Pensions Committee where MPs are taking evidence in their inquiry into understanding the new State Pension.

    Witnesses include:

    • Steve Webb, former Liberal Democrat Work and Pensions minister in the coalition government
    • Sally West, Income and Poverty Strategy Adviser, Age UK 
    • Paul Lewis, Money Box