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Summary

  1. On the committee corridor, the Business committee continued a hearing into the digital economy.
  2. The day in the Commons chamber began with foreign office questions.
  3. That was followed by an SNP led debate on Trident.
  4. In the Lords, after questions, peers will discuss plans to devolve more powers to the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies, Aiden James and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. Lords Adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has adjourned for the day.

    It will meet again at 15:00 GMT tomorrow, with questions on domestic abuse, violence against women, women with HIV, and the decision not to show the lord's prayer in cinemas.

    The main buisness of the day will be the report stage of the Enterprise Bill.

  2. Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill passes

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lords has returned to complete the Northern Ireland Bill.

    Since no amendments were tabled the Bill passes the Lords.

  3. Bill passes second reading

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dunlop
    Image caption: Lord Dunlop

    Government Spokesperson Lord Dunlop sums up the debate.

    He says the government has worked hard to build consensus among the Northern Ireland parties.

    The bill passes second reading, and the house adjourns for at least ten minutes. Members are now free to table amendments to the bill. 

    The bill's later stages will all be read tonight.

  4. "Risk of the collapse of devolution"

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow Northern Ireland spokesperson Lord McAvoy sums up the debate for the opposition.

    He says "without an agreement there was a real risk of the collapse of devolution and the return of home rule."

    He says Labour will support the Bill.

  5. Northern Ireland Assembly branded "dysfunctional"

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Rogan says the matter of welfare reform should have been addressed by the Northern Ireland Assembly.

    He describes the Assembly as "dysfunctional" and "incapable of making decisions."

    Lord Rogan
    Image caption: Lord Rogan
  6. "Failings" in the agreement

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Glentoran
    Image caption: Lord Glentoran

    Conservative Lord Glentoran says there are "some failings" in the agreement which made the bill possible.

    He says that no agreement has been reached regarding the issue of flags and parades, and raises the issue of the legacy of the troubles, particularly missing persons.

    He says there is a need to create jobs and improve the level of education for young people in Northern Ireland. 

    He says he will support the Bill. 

  7. Budget allows 'successful devolved government'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform Bill)

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Browne of Belmont says he welcomes the bill. 

    He says it will allow the Northern Ireland Executive to have a stable budget, which he describes as a "prerequisite for successful devolved government." 

  8. "Get it through quickly"

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alderdice
    Image caption: Lord Alderdice

    Liberal Democrat Northern Ireland spokesperson Lord Alderdice says that Northern Ireland legislation is often rushed through, and this is "not entirely satisfactory."

    However, he says it's best to "get it though quickly" in the case of this bill. 

  9. Northern Ireland Bill debate begins

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dunlop is introducing the second reading of the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill.

    The Bill passed all its stages in the Commons yesterday.

    The Bill would give the government the power to introduce its UK-wide welfare reforms in Northern Ireland.

    Read more here

  10. Scotland Bill passes second reading

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hollick says the minister has "struggled" to answer the question repeatedly put to him on how the Bill can be considered without the fiscal framework.

    However he withdraws his motion, which would have prevented powers being devolved to Scotland before the framework was agreed.

    He says peers will return to the issue.

    The Bill passes its second reading without amendment. 

  11. Minister responds to debate

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dunlop
    Image caption: Lord Dunlop

    Scotland Office Minister Lord Dunlop is summing up the debate for the government.

    He thanks Labour and the Liberal Democrats for their support on the Bill.

    He says the government's priority is to deliver on the Smith Commission report in full.

    He reassures peers that negotiations with the Scottish Government are addressing their concerns about the fiscal framework, and that they will try and complete the negotiations in a timely manner so the Bill can be considered in light of the framework.

    He says he hopes the Bill will have passed by the Scottish Parliament elections next spring. 

  12. Labour "trusts" the government on fiscal framework

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Davidson
    Image caption: Lord Davidson

    Lord Davidson is sums up the debate for the opposition by outlining Labour's support for the bill. 

    He says they are prepared to "trust" the UK government and the Scottish government to conduct their negotiations on the fiscal framework without the bill being delayed. 

  13. Lib Dems want to see fiscal framework

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Stephen
    Image caption: Lord Stephen

    Liberal Democrat Scotland spokesperson Lord Stephen says "the whole of the United Kingdom has become far too centralised", and calls for a constitutional convention to look at further devolution, adding that the Liberal Democrats would argue for a "federal solution."

    He says that the House needs to see the fiscal framework to scrutinise the bill, but they cannot delay the bill.  

  14. Goodnight from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons adjourns after a long day.

    A busy day awaits MPs tomorrow too, beginning at 11:30 GMT with Northern Ireland questions, before David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn face each other at Prime Minister's Questions.

    After that, Chancellor George Osborne will deliver his Autumn Statement to MPs, along with details of the government's Comprehensive Spending Review.

    Stay with us tonight as the House of Lords continue debate on the Scotland Bill.

  15. Minister remembers first mobile phone

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Vaizey

    Communications Minister Ed Vaizey notes the contribution of DUP MPs to the adjournment debate.

    He jokes that he could tell they were not Labour MPs because "they're still debating their policy on this issue and it will come before the shadow cabinet on Monday".

    Mr Vaizey, now the MP for Wantage in Oxfordshire, says he remembers buying his first mobile phone as the parliamentary candidate in Bristol East in 1997, adding that it helped him turn "a 5,000 Labour majority into a 17,000 Labour majority".

    Turning to the topic of mobile phone contracts, he says it is "important that the switching process is made as easy as possible".

  16. 'Up to 70% on wrong mobile contract'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nigel Huddleston

    Nigel Huddleston's adjournment debate concerns "contracts in the mobile telecommunications market", and the Conservative MP calls for reforms including making switching tariffs and operators easier.

    "We love our mobile phones but we do not always love the mobile operators, and we don't always love the prices that come with them," he says.

    He claims that "up to 70% of consumers are the wrong contracts for their needs".

    This means "the average UK household could save up to £160 a year by choosing a more suitable tariff", he adds.

  17. 'Union put in peril'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Turnbull
    Image caption: Lord Turnbull

    Crossbencher Lord Turnbull says "the bill is full of holes", and highlights the lack of a fiscal framework, as have other peers.

    He says this bill is too important to pass before the framework is ready.

    He says the success of the bill is important for the Union but if the settlement is poor and "collapses in acrimony", the "Union will be put in peril."

  18. Iran motion approved

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree the government motion to take note of EU documents on sanctions against Iran.

    Conservative MP Mark Spencer presents a petition from his constituents calling for improved wheelchair access to railway stations, before fellow Conservative Nigel Huddleston opens tonight's adjournment debate. 

  19. Minister closes debate

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    Tobias Ellwood

    Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood responds to MPs who have raised concerns about the amount of time allowed to debate the Iran nuclear deal and the potential lifting of sanctions.

    He suggests they approach the Commons Backbench Business Committee to try to secure a debate to enable "continuing scrutiny of this particular matter".

    Today's Commons order paper allowed up to 90 minutes to today's debate.

    He says that sanctions "can be reimposed" if Iran breaks its commitments.

  20. 'Taxation hand in hand with representation'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Sanderson says he supports the bill "because taxation must go hand in hand with representation".

  21. 'Back in the community of nations'

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    Jacob Rees-Mogg

    Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg, a member of the Commons European Scrutiny Committee, gives the Iran nuclear deal a qualified welcome.

    He refers to North Korea, which he calls "the most rogue of rogue states", suggesting it is "secure in its wrongdoing and its internal oppression, and it's cocking a snook at the rest of world because Kin Jong-un has a nuclear weapon".

    He views the Iran nuclear deal, therefore, as "a very successful policy" in terms of global security, adding: 

    Quote Message: Iran is now back in the community of nations."
  22. MP raises human rights in Iran

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim Shannon

    "Where's the evidence of change in Iran when is comes to human rights?" asks DUP MP Jim Shannon.

    He highlights the number of executions in Iran and the treatment of followers of the Baha'i faith, and asks why sanctions should be reduced under such circumstances.

    Mr Shannon says he is "a friend of Israel" and says some in Iran want "the destruction of the state of Israel".

  23. SNP welcomes deal

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons chamber

    SNP spokesman Patrick Grady says his party is "fully supportive" of the work to reach a nuclear deal with Iran, with the aim of ensuring "that Iran's nuclear programme is entirely peaceful".

    Following the SNP-led debate opposing the UK's nuclear weapons capability, he adds: "Weapons of mass destruction are a threat to humanity, no matter where located."

    He welcomes the prospect of improved diplomatic ties and trade with Iran.

  24. Criticism of the SNP

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord McCluskey criticises the Scottish National Party for not taking seats in the Lords.

    He argues this means they are passing up the chance to shape legislation affecting Scotland.

    He says he is seriously disappointed at the capacity of Members of the Scottish Parliament to scrutinise legislation, adding that too few MSPs have the experience or expertise to do the job properly.

    He says he is concerned about handing more powers to a parliament which is not capable of exercising them well. 

  25. Fiscal arrangements 'don't matter' says peer

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Maxton
    Image caption: Lord Maxton

    Labour's Lord Maxton says "it doesn't really matter" what fiscal arrangements the UK government comes to with the Scottish government, because at some point the Scottish National Party will find a grievance with it.

    He calls on the UK government to stop "appeasing" the SNP.

    He argues that Scotland could "slip" towards independence unless nationalism is fought.

  26. Motion on Iran nuclear deal

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The government motion for approval asks the House to "take note" of various "European Union Documents concerning restrictive measures against Iran".

    Is also asks MPs to support "the government’s view that, had the suspension of certain EU restrictive measures against Iran not been extended in the final stages of negotiations, the prospects for reaching an agreement would have been significantly diminished". 

  27. 'Verification will trigger lifting of sanctions'

    Restrictive measures against Iran

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Foreign Office minister Pat McFadden says the nuclear deal with Iran was reached after many years of "intensive diplomatic efforts".

    He adds that verification of Iran's implementation of the deal by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) "will trigger the lifting of the sanctions on Iran". 

  28. Iran nuclear deal: Centrifuge decommissioning 'begins'

    From the BBC News website

    US Secretary of State John Kerry, UK Foreign Minister Philip Hammond, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, Iranian ambassador to the IAEA Ali Akbar Salehi and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, 14 July 2015
    Image caption: The nuclear deal came after long negotiations

    Iran has begun to decommission uranium enrichment centrifuges in order to fulfil the nuclear deal struck with six world powers in July, its nuclear chief announced during a visit to Japan.

    Ali Akbar Salehi said initial work to reduce the number of centrifuges had started, but would take some time.

    Iran insists that its nuclear programme is entirely peaceful.

    The July agreement involves the lifting of sanctions in return for Iran curbing sensitive nuclear activities.

    The deal between the so-called P5+1 - the US, UK, France, China and Russia plus Germany - was reached after 20 months of negotiations.

    Read more.

  29. 'Flawed framework could weaken the Union'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Sharkey
    Image caption: Lord Sharkey

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Sharkey says it is "impossible" to debate this bill without seeing the fiscal framework.

    He adds that if the framework is "flawed" it could cause "friction" and "weaken the union".

  30. Iran debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP's opposition debates conclude and Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood opens the next debate, on EU documents on restrictive measures against Iran.

    Mr Ellwood says a nuclear deal with Iran is now in place and "Iran is beginning to take the required steps to limit its nuclear programme".

  31. HMRC motion rejected

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP motion condemning the closure of HMRC offices is defeated by 301 votes to 154, giving the government a majority of 147.

  32. Division on tax offices motion

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting on an SNP motion which "condemns the proposed closure of HMRC offices in Scotland and throughout the UK".

  33. Government should try and strengthen the union

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Quin says that, even though she was not allowed to take part, the Scottish independence referendum was "the most important" vote in her lifetime.

    She says she does not believe that the promise of further devolution, known as "the vow", was the reason Scotland voted no.

    She says that she will support the bill but urges the government to look at ways to strengthen the union.

  34. 'Simply not efficient'

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Damian Hinds

    Exchequer Secretary Damian Hinds replies for the government, saying that the main aim is to bring HMRC's workforce together in regional centres to "deliver higher quality public services at a lower cost to the taxpayer".

    He adds:

    Quote Message: It is simply not efficient to have HMRC's 58,000 employees spread throughout 170 offices across the UK."
  35. SNP response

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Roger Mullin

    SNP Treasury spokesman Roger Mullin comments on the speeches by Conservative MPs in today's debate on HMRC office closures.

    He says it seems that "they like the policy, just didn't agree with any one of the locations" of the new regional tax centres.

    He gets more laughter when he jokes that a "loyal" speech from Conservative MP Huw Merriman contained "all the right words but they exist in the wrong order". 

  36. Union 'bedrock of economic strength'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness McIntosh of Pickering
    Image caption: Baroness McIntosh of Pickering

    Conservative Baroness McIntosh of Pickering is giving her maiden speech in the lords.

    She says she is "proud" of her Scottish roots, and that she "firmly" believes that the union is the bedrock of our economic strength. 

  37. House needs more information

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Shipley
    Image caption: Lord Shipley

    Liberal Democrat Lord Shipley says he "supports the principles behind this bill."

    He says he is "puzzled" about why the bill is being considered before the fiscal framework for devolution is agreed.

    The framework refers to the rules about accountability relating to Scotland's public finances.   

    He says without it, the House lacks the information it need to get the legislation right. 

  38. SNP: Closures not about modernisation

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Christopher Stephens rejects the notion that the closure of HMRC offices is about "modernisation". 

    He claims Conservative ministers and MPs are talking about "online tax returns" when they rejected online ballots for trade union members during the passage of the Trade Union Bill.

    Labour's Andy McDonald agrees, and says he is sick of hearing ministers say things like "I feel your pain" and offering to look after staff, adding:

    Quote Message: It's a funny way to look after staff to say: your job's going."
  39. Hope for the bill?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer and former Lord Justice General of Scotland Lord Hope of Craighead is now contributing to the debate on the Scotland Bill.

    Lord Hope says he has "mixed feelings" about the bill, but agrees that it must pass quickly. 

    He congratulates Lord Smith on getting the recommendations of his report to this legislative stage before it is "even one year old".

    These congratulations aside, Lord Hope says there are "really serious grounds for concern" with the bill. 

    He wonders if the Scottish Parliament "can really handle" what the government is proposing to deliver to it after the political situation has "changed entirely from what was envisaged in 1998". 

    Lord Hope of Craighead
  40. 'Selling a car without an engine'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Forsyth of Drumlean

    Former Scotland Secretary and Conservative peer Lord Forsyth of Drumlean begins his contribution by saying that he is pleased to hear Lord Foulkes saying that Scottish devolution "has not worked out the way he thought it would".

    "I always thought it would be a disaster," he tells the chamber.

    Lord Forsyth goes on to compare the lack of any information on the fiscal framework for the bill to his father selling a used car but insisting that he could not show the buyer the engine or the gearbox before the sale was complete.

  41. A 'one-party state'

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Steel says that the Scotland Bill "was not properly scrutinised in the House of Commons" and this needs to be addressed if the bill is to make it onto the statute book by Easter.

    The former Liberal leader's second point in his contribution is that he is "deeply disturbed by the growth of a one-party state in Scotland".

    He describes his "high regard" for leading SNP figures Nicola Sturgeon, John Swinney and Angus Robertson, as well as "talented younger members" who "should not be sneered at".

    However, he says that the "one-party state is a real threat" because of the "growing assumption" that if a person is not an SNP supporter then they are "somehow un-patriotic or anti-Scottish".

    Lord Steel adds that the growing trend of centralisation is another threat.

  42. MP withdraws from SNP whip amid probe

    From the BBC News website

    Natalie McGarry

    An MP has withdrawn from the SNP whip amid a police investigation over apparent discrepancies in an independence campaign fund.

    Natalie McGarry was caught up in a probe after concerns were raised by Women for Independence.

    The Glasgow East MP said she was resigning from the whip "in the best interests of the party", but maintained she had done nothing wrong.

    Party leader Nicola Sturgeon had said she wanted more information before acting.

    Read more.

  43. Memories of a young Lord Foulkes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Steel of Aikwood begins his contribution by telling the chamber that in the 1960s he was president of the student representative council in the University of Edinburgh.

    He recalls a young man elected in the same year "who turned out to be a complete pest - always raising points of order and interrupting people".

    Lord Steel says "I always wondered what would happen to that young man. His name was George Foulkes [now Labour peer Lord Foulkes of Cumnock]", which is greeted with laughter across the chamber.

    Lord Steel
  44. Call for a federal UK

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Foulkes of Cumnock warns that the Conservative government is approaching constitutional change "on an ad-hoc basis".

    Lord Foulkes ends by joining other peers in calling for a federalised UK that includes Scotland and Wales, whilst also addressing the English democratic deficit and Lords reform - otherwise "independence is inevitable", he says. 

    "It is about time the Conservative government did something positive to protect the union", he says. 

  45. 'Cannot afford to lose jobs'

    HMRC debate

    Chris Law

    SNP MP Chris Law says the jobs of 650 people in Dundee are at risk.

    They have "been offered little more that empty promises about a possible move to the Department for Work and Pensions", the Dundee West MP says, before adding: 

    Quote Message: Dundee cannot afford to lose these highly-skilled jobs."
  46. 'Cack-handed' closure programme

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Conservative MP for the West Yorkshire constituency of Shipley, Philip Davies, says the government has gone about its HMRC office closure programme in a "cack-handed way".

    He says HMRC currently employs "2,300 people in the Bradford district" but there are plans to locate a new regional hub in Leeds.

    Mr Davies argues that this "makes absolutely no sense whatsoever".

    Living costs are lower in Bradford, he says, meaning a move to Leeds will be "more expensive for the taxpayer". 

  47. 'No serious consideration' of bill's effect

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Lang
    Image caption: Lord Lang

    The Chairman of the Lords Constitution Committee, Conservative peer Lord Lang of Monkton, says the bill introduced "uncertainty" about parliamentary sovereignty.

    He says "no serious consideration seems to have been given" to the implications of the bill for the United Kingdom as a whole.

  48. Trident: How Labour MPs voted

    BBC Analysis and Research

    Most Labour MPs abstained in today's vote on the SNP motion opposing Trident's renewal but 14 voted with the government and against the SNP. They were:

    Kevin Barron

    Ben Bradshaw

    Mary Creagh

    Chris Evans

    Jim Fitzpatrick

    Liz Kendall

    Chris Leslie

    Madeline Moon

    Albert Owen

    Jamie Reed

    Emma Reynolds

    Angela Smith

    Gisela Stuart

    John Woodcock

    Meanwhile, six Labour MPs voted with the SNP. They were:

    Roger Godsiff

    Ronnie Campbell

    Kelvin Hopkins

    Graham Stringer

    Dennis Skinner

    Geoffrey Robinson

  49. Labour: More staff means more revenue

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rob Marris

    Shadow Treasury minister Rob Marris begins his speech by saying that the previous coalition government of the Conservatives and Lib Dems did make some progress in tackling tax avoidance.

    "More should be done but they made good steps" the Labour MP tells the House.

    He says that the National Audit Office has reported "an 18 to one return" from the employment of more HMRC staff, meaning "£1 more in salary means £18 more in revenue".

    Mr Marris says there has not been enough action to improve the  customer service performance of the HMRC, calling this "the worst of statism".

    Quote Message: If it were a business, HMRC would have gone bust with that level of customer service."
  50. A new act of union

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Campbell of Pittenweem
    Image caption: Lord Campbell of Pittenweem

    Liberal Democrat Lord Campbell of Pittenweem is making his maiden speech in the Lords.

    Lord Campbell says he is a proud Scot, who is also proud to be a citizen of the United Kingdom. 

    He says "our union is under threat" and  we need a "new Act of Union" which sets out the "responsibilities and rights of all four nations."

  51. 'Unworkable' principle

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Forsyth
    Image caption: Lord Forsyth

    Conservative Lord Forsyth has asked the same question of every speaker in the Scotland Bill debate "Can you explain how the second no-detriment principle works?"

    No speaker has been able to give a detailed answer so far, although Lord Smith described it as "complicated."

    The second no detriment principle is defined as follows on the House of Lords website:

    "There should be no detriment as a result of UK Government or Scottish Government policy decisions post-devolution”  

    BBC Scotland Business and Economy Editor Douglas Fraser says "if it's interpreted literally, it means that the use of any tax power which gets an advantage over another part of the UK requires compensation to the disadvantaged side."

    Labour's Baroness Liddell pre-empts Lord Forsyth's question and describes the principle as "unworkable" because there is no definition of detriment.

  52. 'High quality regional centres'

    HMRC debate

    David Gauke

    Treasury minister David Gauke says the government aims to "drive down evasion, tackle avoidance and improve compliance" and is reducing the "tax gap".

    He concedes that there have been problems with HMRC customer service.

    He defends the closure of local tax offices, claiming the best way to collect tax is through "high quality regional centres".

  53. 'Think very carefully' about altering bill

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Smith
    Image caption: Lord Smith

    Crossbench peer Lord Smith of Kelvin is speaking on the Scotland Bill.

    Lord Smith chaired the commission which made proposals on further devolution of powers to the Scottish Parliament.

    The Smith Commission achieved agreement between the major political parties on what further powers would be devolved.

    He says the Scottish National Party signed up to "every word" in the agreement, and that the bill matches the agreement they made.

    He warns the House to "think very carefully" before altering the bill and thus being seen to renege on the agreement.

  54. More on the SNP motion

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP motion "calls on the government to halt its programme of HMRC office closures".

    The motions argues that the closure programme "will undermine efforts to reduce the tax gap which currently stands at £34 billion [and] also believes that this proposal will undermine the ability of SMEs (small businesses) to access information and advice".

    Spokeswoman Hannah Bardell calls on MPs to vote to support the motion and "ask this Tory government to think again".

  55. HMRC reveals tax office shake-up

    Kevin Peachey

    Online personal finance reporter

    HMRC

    The UK's tax authority is to close 137 local offices and replace them with 13 regional centres, raising fears over job losses.

    The closures will be complete by 2027, according to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC), but the new centres will be open in the next five years.

    Towns and cities hosting the new offices include Cardiff, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Bristol and Croydon.

    The plan comes as HMRC faces criticism of its call centres.

    Read more.

  56. The road to fedralism

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Wallace of Tankerness
    Image caption: Lord Wallace of Tankerness

    Liberal Democrat Leader in the House of Lords Lord Wallace of Tankerness says that the bill is a "further step on the road to federalism", which he says has been a long term aim of the Liberal Democrats.

    He says he wants to see the fiscal framework at some point during the bill's passage, but that the bill should not be delayed, in case Scottish nationalists see the delay as a "betrayal".

  57. 'A regime of austerity'

    HMRC debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hannah Bardell

    SNP employment spokeswoman Hannah Bardell says the planned closure of 137 HMRC offices "is driven by this UK government's continued drive to rain down a regime of austerity cuts across our family of nations".

    She says that "over 2,000 jobs" could be lost in Scotland as a result.

  58. HMRC offices debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The second of today's SNP-led debates concerns the closure of HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) offices.

    The motion "condemns the proposed closure of HMRC offices in Scotland and throughout the UK [and] believes that this will result in a reduced service to the public".

  59. Trident motion falls

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP motion opposing Trident is defeated by 330 votes to 64 - a majority of 266.

  60. Labour concerned about the devolution of abortion law

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord McAvoy says Labour is concerned about the devolution of abortion law, and calls for "extensive consultation" on the issue.

  61. Division on Trident motion

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House divides to vote on the opposition motion, tabled by the SNP and supported by Plaid Cymru and Green Party.

    The motion says that "Trident should not be renewed".

  62. 'Minimum credible deterrent'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philip Dunne

    Defence Minister Philip Dunne replies to the debate, repeating that the government is committed to what he calls "a minimum credible and assured deterrent".

    He says, while the views and votes of Scotland should be taken into account, this policy is "for the whole United Kingdom".

    He adds: "We do not live in a ideal world, much as we might wish it."

    He also claims that some Labour MPs have spoken "with courage", adding:

    Quote Message: Let your conscience guide you into the right division lobby this afternoon."
  63. The vow

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord McAvoy says it is "incredibly disappointing" that there are no draft proposals for the fiscal framework for the House to consider alongside the Bill.

    He says the Bill "delivers on the promise" made to the Scottish people during the referendum to give them more powers.

    This promise was called "the vow."

    Read more here.

  64. 'Empty Labour benches'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP armed forces spokeswoman Kirsten Oswald says she is "disappointed to see so many empty Labour benches".

    She suggests that this is because Labour does not have a "clear position" on Trident renewal.

    Ms Oswald thanks Defence Secretary Michael Fallon for a "measured" speech but rejects his argument in support of the UK's nuclear weapons.

    Kirsten Oswald in the Commons
    Image caption: SNP MP Kirsten Oswald stands to speak for her party
  65. No fiscal framework

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hollick
    Image caption: Lord Hollick

    Labour's Lord Hollick is moving an amendment to the Second Reading of the Scotland Bill.

    This amendment would delay passing the parts of the Scotland Bill relating to tax and welfare powers.

    Lord Hollick says the Bill does not contain anything about the 'fiscal framework' recommended by the Smith Commission. 

    The fiscal framework proposals are the rules by which public spending in Scotland would be overseen, including limits on borrowing and rules on accountability.

    Lord Hollick says it is wrong to devolve other financial powers until the fiscal framework is set out.

  66. 'Illegal and immoral'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Green Party MP Caroline Lucas, who put her name to the SNP motion opposing Trident, says nuclear weapons are "illegal, immoral and a grotesque diversion of resources".

    Caroline Lucas
  67. 'An insane abomination'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Kelvin Hopkins says he is a "lifelong unilateral disarmer" and thousands of Labour Party members and millions of UK citizens agree with him.

    "Nuclear weapons are an insane abomination," he tells the House.

    "Any sane person would say they have to go."

  68. 'No-one can win a nuclear war'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ronnie Cowan

    SNP MP Ronnie Cowan says the UK nuclear weapons have the capacity to cause "250 million deaths" with many more dying from polluted water supplies and lack of food.

    "By arming itself with Trident the UK government is saying it is willing to inflict this fate on millions of innocent civilians if it was deemed necessary," he says.

    Quote Message: No-one can win a nuclear war."
  69. Independent deterrent 'myth'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Roger Godsiff

    Labour MP Roger Godsiff says he is a "multilateralist" and, while having no "moral objection" to nuclear weapons, questions the UK's possession of them.

    He claims it is a "myth" that the UK has an "independent deterrent", as some other MPs voice noisy disagreement.

    He says the possession of nuclear weapons by the UK and France did not prevent the London bombings in 2005 or the recent attacks in Paris.

    However, he backs UK membership of Nato and "the nuclear umbrella that the United States provides".

  70. Key points: Smith Commission report

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The cross-party Smith Commission on further devolution has recommended the Scottish Parliament be given new powers over some taxes and welfare payments.

    The commission's chair, Lord Smith, said the changes would "deliver a stronger parliament, a more accountable parliament and a more autonomous parliament".

    Read more here

  71. Second Reading of the Scotland Bill begins

    Scotland Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Saltaire

    Scotland Office Minister Lord Dunlop is opening the second reading debate on the Scotland Bill.

    The bill seeks to implement the recommendations of the Smith Commission following the “No” vote in the 2014 Scottish referendum on independence.

    Key elements include: 

    • Allowing Holyrood to set thresholds and rates of income tax on earnings in Scotland and keeping all the money raised in Scotland
    • Giving the Edinburgh parliament control over the first 10 percentage points of standard rate VAT revenue raised in Scotland
    • New welfare powers worth £2.5bn
    • Enabling the Scottish government to vary the frequency of Universal Credit payments in Scotland
    • Providing power to set the rules over a range of benefits which affect carers, disabled people and the elderly
    • Giving control over programmes which help people find work
  72. Defence committee chairman speaks

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Julian Lewis, who chairs the Commons Defence Committee, makes his contribution to the Trident debate.

    He says if he had to reflect the views of the members of his committee, he would spend "90% of my time arguing passionately in favour of the nuclear deterrent".

    However, he adds, he does not have to do this and makes clear his support for UK nuclear weapons, though he concedes that "both sides of the case have a good argument to make".

  73. Committe session comes to an end

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    That brings an end to the Home Affairs Committee sessions for this afternoon.

    Join us tomorrow morning for live coverage of the Work and Pensions Committee from 9.30am.

  74. 'A step down the nuclear ladder'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "The government's determination to pursue a like-for-like replacement for Trident ignores the different world in which we now live,"  Alistair Carmichael says.

    The Lib Dem MP argues that such a move would be a "missed opportunity" to contribute to multilateral nuclear disarmament by taking "a step down the nuclear ladder".

    The former Scottish secretary adds that his party has concluded that a "continuous at sea deterrent" is "no longer appropriate".

  75. Tackling people traffickers

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Tim Loughton asks Mr Bikas about the efforts being made within Greece to crack down on people traffickers profiting from the movement of refugees and migrants between Turkey and Greece.

    The Ambassador says that the Greek police will of course apprehend anyone guilty of a crime in Greece but says that the nature of the trafficking set up means that the process should begin in Turkey.

    The traffickers send people on boats from Turkey who are then rescued by the Greek coast guard he says, "so there is not necessarily the need for traffickers waiting to collect people in Greece".

    Tim Loughton
  76. The end of Schengen?

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Victoria Atkins asks ambassador Bikas whether this crisis is the end of the Schengen Agreement, and questions whether or not the positive aspects of the agreement outweigh the problems.

    Mr Bikas responds that Schengen was never designed to deal with the current circumstances but rather to complement the free flow of trade, people and capital.

    The ambassador says that despite the current problems he does not believe that the agreement should end or be suspended.

  77. Northern Powerhouse

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Greaves asks the government what proposals they have for strengthening the role and powers of town and parish councils, particularly as part of the Northern Powerhouse.

    Local Government Minister Baroness Trafford assures the House that local councils will be given all the help they need to cope with the devolution process.

    She says the Northern Powerhouse project shows that strengthening local government is a "fundamental" government goal.

    Read more about the Northern Powerhouse here.

  78. Vicky Thompson found dead at Armley jail

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A transgender woman who told her friends she would kill herself if she was sent to a male prison has been found dead in jail.

    Vicky Thompson, 21, was being held at Armley, Leeds, where she was pronounced dead on Friday.

    Friends of Thompson, who was born male but had identified as female since her mid-teens, said she had asked to be sent to a female prison.

    Read more here.

  79. Transgender people in prison

    Lords question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Barker asks if prison policy on transgender people will be reviewed in light of the death of Vicky Thompson.

    Vicky Thompson, a transgender women, was being held at Armley, Leeds, where she was pronounced dead last week.

    Justice Minister Lord Faulks offers his condolences to the family of Vicky Thompson, and says that the policy on transgender prisoners is under review.  

  80. 'Putting Herod in charge of the nursery'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alistair Carmichael

    Liberal Democrat MP Alistair Carmichael calls for "a more substantial motion in government time" to debate Trident.

    He suggests that Labour does not "lack a clear position" but instead "they have too many clear positions".

    He claims that putting Ken Livingstone in charge of Labour's defence review is like "putting King Herod in charge of the nursery".

    Mr Livingstone is to work alongside shadow defence secretary, Maria Eagle, in the Labour defence review.

  81. Duty solicitors

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Faulks
    Image caption: Lord Faulks

    Liberal Democrat Lord Marks asks if the government is satisfied that the Legal Aid Agency’s evaluation of tenders for the new duty solicitor contracts was fairly and effectively conducted.

    Justice Minister Lord Faulks says "we are."

    The government plans to cut by more than half the number of duty lawyers attending magistrates' courts and police stations in England and Wales.

    Read more here.

  82. A European response is needed

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Ranil Jayawardena

    Conservative MP Ranil Jayawardena asks the ambassador who is responsible for processing people when they arrive and how the impact of this many refugees arriving has been dealt with.

    He responds that the impact is "severe" and says the authorities who deal with arriving people are the coast guard, local police and hospitals as well as the local population.

    "We have to see this as a European crisis and meet it with a European response" Mr Bikas says.

    He also says that the west has responsibility for the destabilisation of countries in causing these problems but has not understood the results of its actions.

  83. Trident replacement: the cost

    From the BBC News website

    Trident graphic
  84. 'Desire to protect ourselves'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jamie Reed

    Jamie Reed, the Labour MP for Copeland, says the UK has nuclear weapons because of "our desire to protect ourselves and not shy away globally from our responsibilities to our allies".

    He says his constituency "has always been at the heart of the independent nuclear deterrent", adding that this is "a source of pride in Cumbria".

    Mr Reed says he was elected on a commitment in Labour's 2015 election manifesto to maintain the capability to use nuclear weapons.

    Quote Message: Unilateralism will never work and believe me, this party has tested that theory to destruction."
  85. Strain on Greece

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Ambassador Bikas says that Greece is currently hosting "two million refugees and migrants in a country of eleven million people" and says "a huge number of these" are due to the Syrian crisis.

    Mr Bikas says that for a country so strongly hit by the Eurozone crisis "you can imagine the strain on our economy and of course on the migrants themselves".

  86. Domestic violence

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A question in the name of Labour's Baroness Royall of Blaisdon is asked about the number of convictions relating to stalking, and if the government thinks the laws surrounding domestic violence are adequate.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says 495 convictions were obtained under new laws during 2014.

    He adds that the College of Policing and the Crown Prosecution Service have done a "great deal of work" to improve performance in this area. 

  87. 'Not about warmongering'

    Trident debate

    Alec Shelbrooke

    Conservative MP Alec Shelbrooke says today's debate "is not about warmongering [and] not about a desire to launch nuclear weapons".

    Nuclear weapons have deterred conflict, he argues, giving the example of North Korea and South Korea.

    Quote Message: North Korea will not launch a nuclear weapon against South Korea if it knows that ten seconds later, it would disappear off the face of the map as well."
  88. False passports

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Mr Vaz asks the ambassador whether Greece has the capabilities to distinguish between genuine and false Syrian passports.

    Mr Bikas responds that as far as he knew the men who took part in the Paris attacks were not identified as having false passports, and in general says that Greek officials are capable of identifying forged documents.

  89. Labour peer introduced

    Lords introductions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hain
    Image caption: Lord Hain

    Lord Hain is being introduced to the House of Lords as a Labour peer. 

    He was the Labour MP for Neath from April 1991 to March 2015, and held a number of ministerial posts, including secretary of state for Wales and secretary of state for work and pensions.

    He was born in South Africa and became known as an anti-apartheid campaigner.

    His family was forced into exile in 1966 because of their involvement in the movement.

    Mr Hain spoke at a thanksgiving service for Nelson Mandela at Westminster Abbey in March 2014, having been a friend of the former South African president.

  90. The 'porous' Greek border

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Greek Ambassador

    Committee Chair Keith Vaz begins this evidence session by asking the ambassador about concerns over the "porous" borders of Greece in relation to perpetrators of the Paris terror attacks who are thought to have arrived in Europe via Greece.

    Ambassador Bikas responds that "If people arrive at your borders and are in need then you have to help them" and points out the difficulties faced by Greece in the current migration crisis.

    Speaking about the specific example of the Paris attackers the Ambassador says that no red flags came up on computer searches for the men when they entered Greece.

  91. Labour peer introduced

    Lords introductions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Murphy of Torfaen
    Image caption: Lord Murphy of Torfaen

    Lord Murphy of Torfaen is being introduced to the House of Lords as a Labour peer. He was the Labour MP for Torfaen from June 1987 to March 2015.

    During his time in the Commons Paul Murphy  served as secretary of state for Wales and secretary of state for Northern Ireland. 

  92. Migration crisis inquiry

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Committee moves on to the next session for its inquiry, the Migration Crisis.

    The witness for this evidence session is the Greek Ambassador to the UK, Konstantinos Bikas.

  93. Keep following the committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    We are moving over to the live House of Lords Coverage now, if you would like to keep following the Home Affairs Committe you can do so by following this link.

    The next evidence session is on the Migration Crisis.  The Home Affairs Committee will be hearing from the Greek Ambassador to the UK .

  94. 'We know what radicalisation looks like'

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Nusrat Ghani asks the witnesses how the information and monitoring of UK nationals who have returned from Syria is being used to help the Prevent strategy and help produce a counter-narrative.

    The minister responds that "We know how people are radicalised as we have some years of experience in these matters. We know what it looks like. We have policy for dealing with it."

    Mr Farr from the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism at the Home Office agrees with the minister on this issue but makes the point that people returning at the start of the Syrian conflict went for a variety of reasons including humanitarian objectives or removing Assad. 

    "These people don't pose a particular threat to us" he says. "It is the people who have traveled more recently that are the issue".

    Charles Farr
  95. The Lords today

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our coverage of the House of Lords.

    The day will begin with the introductions of two Labour peers and former ministers Lord Hain and Lord Murphy of Torfaen.

    There will then be questions on domestic violence, new duty solicitor contracts, the northern powerhouse, and the death of Vicky Thompson.

    Peers will then debate the Scotland Bill at second reading, and the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill in its entirety. 

  96. SNP 'robots'

    Trident debates

    SNP MP John Nicolson raises a point of order and asks if it is acceptable Parliamentary language for a Labour MP to refer to SNP members as "robots".

    Deputy speaker, Eleanor Laing says in some cases it could be and in other cases not, but she's sure the Labour MP who used the word, John Woodcock, was using it to mean very intelligent robots.

    Eleanor Laing
  97. New powers for the security services

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The SNP's Stuart McDonald asks the witnesses how it was that the attackers in Paris who were known to the security services in some cases were not stopped from perpetrating their attacks.

    The Minister responds that MPs will have a chance to vote on new powers for the security services in the coming weeks in the House of Commons that will give them a better chance of thwarting attacks in the UK before they happen.

    Stuart McDonald
  98. 'Like a burglar alarm'

    Trident debate.

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative, Sheryll Murray says the "threat is real" and we must have a credible deterrent that people think we would use.

    It's no good publicising the fact that you are never going to fire it she insists . 

    Her fellow Conservative, Jake Berry intervenes and compares the system to a burglar alarm, saying it is there to keep our country safe.

  99. The experience of the IRA

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Minister John Hayes echoes the words of Mark Rowley in saying that the "long experience of Irish terrorism" has given the UK the advantage of an "unprecedented" period of co-operation between the police and security services.

  100. Security at smaller ports

    Home Affairs Comittee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Tim Loughton

    The Conservative MP for East Worthing and Shoreham Tim Loughton asks what security developments there have been in the UK's smaller airports and smaller ports, like those in his constituency.

    Minister Hayes agrees that there is a "serious challenge" in these smaller entrance points to the UK and tells the committee that there is a "fresh review" on security in these places.

    He says this review is a day-by-day process of practical and operational details rather than a long winded inquiry with a report making conclusions.

  101. Does the UK need Schengen?

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Keith Vaz asks the Minister how the UK security services are supposed to be able to stop British jihadis from returning from Syria while not being part of the Schengen agreement or Prüm Convention, two data sharing agreements between EU states.

    Charles Farr says that whilst the UK is not part of the broader Schengen agreement, the security services have access to the Schengen information system and receive alerts when individuals are flagged up at EU borders.

  102. Labour conducting a review

    Trident debate

    Labour frontbencher, Toby Perkins, says its not appropriate for Labour to vote on today's motion at a  time when it is conducting a defence policy review.

    He adds that this motion from the SNP is "cheap political point-scoring".

    Toby Perkins
  103. Response to 'marauding' attacks

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The next witnesses are the Minister for Security John Hayes and Charles Farr, Director General of the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism at the Home Office.

    Mr Hayes says that in the light of the attacks on beaches in Tunisia and more recently in Paris, the response to such "marauding" attacks has been revised.

    He warns that so-called IS terrorists demonstrate an "adaptability" that was absent in former terrorist tactics.

    Home Affairs Committee
  104. Labour response

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    For Labour, Toby Perkins, says Labour is conducting a review of its defence policies in general and Trident in particular

  105. Cost of 'successor programme'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Michael Fallon says that Trident is "operationally independent" and the SNP's Brendan O'Hara is "quite wrong" to suggest it is dependent on the United States.

    The defence secretary says the "successor programme" to provide a replacement for Trident is set to cost £31bn, with a contingency that it could rise to £40bn allowed.

    HS2 will cost £50bn, he adds.

  106. 'Our nuclear deterrent works'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Michael Fallon

    Michael Fallon says the government is seeking to "create the conditions where nuclear weapons are no longer necessary".

    The defence secretary says the UK's nuclear weapons have been "cut by more than half since the Cold War" and the government has reduced the number of warheads deployed on Trident submarines.

    "Those actions have not been matched anywhere by any other nuclear nation," Mr Fallon adds.

    Quote Message: Our nuclear deterrent works. It deters conflict every single day."
  107. Minister up next

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Mark Rowley finishes his contribution by agreeing that there is a need for more information sharing across Europe, and reiterates his earlier remarks about police funding cuts.

    Answering a question about the "hacktivist" group Anonymous "declaring war" on so-called Islamic State, he says that "he would prefer if they obeyed the law". 

  108. 'Cross-party consensus breaking down'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon says that "we have to have an array of weapons, up to and including a nuclear deterrent" to counter threats to the UK.

    He ignores the SNP at the start of his speech and concentrates on Labour, saying he is concerned that a "cross-party consensus" on retaining nuclear weapons "seems to be breaking down".

    Mr Fallon says former Labour Prime Minister Clement Attlee and Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin "argued for a nuclear deterrent with a Union Jack on top of it".

    The defence secretary claims that "our international allies will look on with dismay at this shambles opposite" and appeals to Labour MPs to vote with the government in support of Trident.

  109. How are suspects monitored

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David Burrowes asks what the risk to public safety is from the estimated 400 Britons who have returned from Syria to the UK. 

    Mr Rowley says there is a banding system of risk for returnees which involves a monitoring process to assess risk.

    He says that after this there are a variety of different routes including de-radicalisation courses as well as prosecution and prison sentences.

    On the subject of barring British citizens from returning to the UK, Mr Rowley says this is "appealing but not practical" as it would undermine international co-operation by stranding known terrorists in foreign countries.

  110. Shoot to kill

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Chuka Umunna

    Labour MP Chuka Umunna asks Mr Rowley about the so-called "shoot to kill" policy of the police which both men agree is "unhelpful" terminology.

    The Assistant Commissioner for Specialist Operations goes through the legal framework and conditions by which officers are able to use lethal force, which he says is that officers can shoot at the body of an assailant in order to immediately incapacitate them.

    "The outcome may be death but that is not the starting point", he says.

    On the subject of the UK threat level Mr Rowley says "it is easy to be complacent" because the threat level has remained the same for a year. 

    He says "an attack is highly likely, that is a dramatic statement".

  111. SNP MPs out in force

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MPs pack the benches for their debate on Trident, while the Conservative and Labour benches are sparsely populated.

    Commons chamber
  112. 'Fur coat and nae knickers'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP defence spokesman Brendan O'Hara suggests that Trident is a case of "fur coat and nae knickers".

    It is "a military and political ego trip", he says, claiming that the weapons cannot be used without the consent of the United States.

    That could mean relying on "President Donald Trump" in the future, he adds.

    Quote Message: Does anyone seriously think that Trident makes the world a safer place?"
  113. Labour MP supports SNP motion

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Kelvin Hopkins

    Labour MP Kelvin Hopkins tells the SNP's Brendan O'Hara that "there are some members of the Labour Party that support his view".

    Mr Hopkins says he will support the SNP motion opposing the renewal of Trident.

  114. What is the threat?

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Mr Rowley says that roughly one third of those being arrested for various terrorist offences are tackled with specific terrorist legislation. These suspects are the most advanced along the track towards planning attacks, he says.

    The other two thirds are prosecuted by primary powers including fraud and assault offences for example.

    Mr Rowley says these are the extremists who are "migrating towards terrorism" and who the security services are aiming to "disrupt". 

    Other figures given are that 7 major plots have been foiled over the last year and that there are "several thousand" homegrown extremists currently in the UK. 

  115. 'Bright non-nuclear future'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Brendan O'Hara says that the naval port of Faslane, where nuclear-armed Trident submarines are based, can have "a bright non-nuclear future".

  116. Trident opposition 'caused palpitations'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Brendan O'Hara

    SNP defence spokesman Brendan O'Hara says opposition to Trident is one of the policies on which his party's 56 MPs were elected in May.

    "Very soon the United Kingdom will decide whether or not to commit to spend £160 billion over the lifetime of the Trident programme," he says.

    He adds that his party hoped that its motion, which is backed by Plaid Cymru and the Greens, would have Labour support, as the party elected "an avowed unilateralist" in leader Jeremy Corbyn.

    Mr O'Hara claims that "the very thought" of opposition to nuclear weapons has "caused palpitations in both the red and blue shades of the British establishment".

  117. Police funding

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Committee Chair Keith Vaz begins today's session by thanking Mark Rowley from the Special Operations team in the Metropolitan Police for the work of his team.

    Mr Vaz's first few questions relate to police funding for counter-terrorism operations in the aftermath of the Paris attacks and the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR).

    Mr Rowley says "the scale of the budget is important, dramatic cuts that undermine our capabilities would concern me".

    Mark Rowley
  118. Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Home Affairs Committee is due to meet at 1pm today for the first of two oral evidence sessions this afternoon.

    The first evidence session will be for the committee's inquiry into tackling extremism and will hear from:

    • Mark Rowley QPM, Assistant Commissioner for Specialist Operations in the Metropolitan Police 

    • John Hayes MP, Minister for Security

    • Charles Farr, Director General, Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism, Home Office

  119. Trident

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first of today's opposition day debates begins.

    The SNP have chosen the topic for this debate and have proposed the straightfoward motion that "this House believes that Trident should not be renewed".

  120. About the bill

    Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve McCabe's bill would provide "guidance to local authorities on when to take enforcement action for breaches of planning law".

    It would also "make provision about rights and entitlements, including of appeal, for people whose homes are affected by such breaches" and  "establish financial penalties for developers who breach planning law in certain circumstances".

  121. 'Architectural carbuncles'

    Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve McCabe

    Steve McCabe, the Labour MP for Birminghan Selly Oak, says parts of his continuency which were almost exclusively given over to family homes are now filled with "architectural carbuncles".

    Many of the properties are now to let, the MP says, with skips outside and extensions being built.

    The there is now "the constant noise" of "additional bedrooms being hammered and bolted onto existing dwellings", Mr McCabe adds.

    The local authority "seems powerless to arrest this destruction", he claims.

  122. Bill aims to protect family homes

    Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Questions are over and it is time for a ten minute rule bill.

    Labour MP Steve McCabe is introducing his Protection of Family Homes (Enforcement and Permitted Development) Bill.

    He has up to ten minutes to make a speech in support of his bill, which aims to protect people whose homes are affected by breaches of planning law.

    If this type of private members' bill is opposed, an MP can make a speech of up to ten minutes opposing it.

  123. Live: Russian warplane shot down on Syria border

    BBC News

    Crash site

    You can follow the latest developments with BBC News online here.

  124. Hammond on Russian warplane reports

    Foreign Office questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philip Hammond

    Following reports that the Turkish military has shot down a Russian military aircraft on the border with Syria, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond tells the Commons:

    Quote Message: We are seeking further details urgently both in Moscow and in Ankara. Clearly this is potentially a serious incident but I think it wouldn't be wise, Mr Speaker, to comment any further until we've got more certainty on the facts."
  125. Labour: Who will take part in Syria talks?

    Foreign Office questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament