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Summary

  1. The day in the chamber began with defence questions.
  2. That was followed by the announcement of the national security strategy and strategic defence review.
  3. MPs then moved on to the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill.
  4. In the Lords, after questions, peers continued their detailed scrutiny of the European Union Referendum Bill.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies, Aiden James and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Goodnight from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's it for the Commons too.

    MPs meet again tomorrow from 11:30 GMT for Foreign Office questions.

    The main business consists of two opposition debates on topics chosen by the SNP.

    The first is on Trident and the second on HMRC office closures.

  2. Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords re-convenes.

    A message from the Commons is read out, saying they have passed the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill.

    The Lords gives the bill a first reading, which means they agree to debate it at a later date, and the House adjourns.

    The Lords will re-convene at 14:30 GMT tomorrow, with questions on convictions for stalking, new solicitor contracts, town and parish councils and the northern powerhouse, and the death of Vicky Thompson.

  3. 'Behaviour change' needed

    Adjournment debate

    Jane Ellison

    Health Minister Jane Ellison says the rising use of antibiotics has "a direct impact on antimicrobial resistance".

    If antibiotics cease to be effective, "even minor surgery and routine operations would become high-risk procedures", she says.

    She adds:

    Quote Message: Behaviour change is at the heart of how we tackle the problem."
  4. Adjournment debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Maggie Throup

    The final business in the Commons tonight is the adjournment debate.

    Conservative MP Maggie Throup makes a speech on the use of antibiotics in primary care.

    She is concerned that antibiotics are prescribed too often.

  5. Bill passes third reading

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie reiterates her party's opposition to the UK government's welfare plans.

    She also claims that the UK Parliament legislating in this area is contrary to the idea of "full devolution" to Northern Ireland.

    The DUP's Nigel Dodds claims that opposing the bill would mean "voting for the collapse of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the return of direct rule".

    He need not worry as the bill clears its final stage in the Commons without a vote.

  6. Lords to resume shortly

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords is due to resume shortly.

  7. Budget dispute 'a drag anchor'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "The dispute over the budget has been a draq anchor on Northern Ireland politics for too long," says Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers.

    It is time to pass the bill and implement "the Order in Council to follow", she says.

    In brief comments on behalf of the opposition, Labour's Vernon Coaker says he wants more action on jobs to accompany the legislation.

    Theresa Villiers
  8. New clause one rejected

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SDLP new clause is rejected by 171 votes to five - a majority of 166.

    That ends the committee stage. MPs skip the normal next stage, report stage, and move straight to a brief third reading.

  9. About Orders in Council

    From the UK Parliament website

    Orders in Council are used when an ordinary statutory instrument would be inappropriate, such as for transferring responsibilities between government departments. They are issued by and with the advice of Her Majesty's Privy Council. Orders in Council were used to transfer the powers from ministers of the UK government to the devolved governments.

  10. Vote on SDLP new clause one

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Ben Wallace argues that the timetable of the sunset clause as it stands is the right one.

    The SDLP's Mark Durkan declines to push the matter to a vote but the party does push their proposed new clause one and the House divides.

    New clause one would require the UK government to report on the impact of orders made under the legislation in the first twelve months.

    Commons division
  11. 'Sunset clause'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MPs withdraw their amendments to clause one of the bill and the House agrees that the clause "stand part" of the bill.

    Clause two is quickly disposed of but the SDLP has tabled an amendment to clause three, to move the bill's "sunset clause" forward.

    The bill is "enabling legislation", which gives the secretary of state the power to make Orders in Council, which can be used to transfer powers to the devolved administration.

    The bill stipulates that no orders can be made after 31 December 2016 but the SDLP want the date brought forward to 1 June 2016, to take account of elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly in May.

  12. 'Not trying to dismantle'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie says her party is "not trying to disturb or dismantle" the legislation with its amendments.

    She tells the House that the aim is to ensure "a better deal for those who would be benefit claimants".

    Among the amendments tabled is one which would prevent the UK government ordering a benefit cap.

  13. House adjourns 'during pleasure'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has adjourned temporarily, in anticipation of a message from the House of Commons. They should re-convene later this evening.

  14. Committee stage begins

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree to the bill's second reading without a vote, and the House moves to committee stage, allowing amendments to be debated.

    SDLP MP Mark Durkan introduces an amendment to limit the UK government's ability to recommend orders "affecting social security and child support maintenance, and employment and training for employment". 

  15. Minister wants implementation 'imminently'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Northern Ireland Minister Ben Wallace welcomes Labour's support for the deal and for the bill tonight.

    He says he expects an order to implement the welfare changes "imminently", if the bill passes.

    He adds that the deal will be accompanied by "£185 million of new money" for Northern Ireland.

    He tells UUP MPs that the money is intended for security measures "and to monitor paramilitary activity". 

  16. Northern Ireland election motion passes

    Northern Ireland election motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Tyler withdraws his amendment, and the original motion passes. 

  17. Labour response

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary Vernon Coaker replies to the second reading debate for Labour.

    He reminds MPs that, if a deal had not been struck, the devolved Northern Ireland Executive could have collapsed and direct rule from London could have been re-introduced.

  18. 'We still have the IRA'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tom Elliott

    Tom Elliott of the UUP, while welcoming "moving forward with welfare reform", says: "We still have the IRA army council in place, we still have the IRA with arms and we still have the IRA shooting people on our streets". 

  19. Regret motion

    Northern Ireland election motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Tyler is introducing a motion of regret to the motion approving changes to election rules in Northern Ireland.

    He argues that the changes will postpone alterations to the electoral registration process in Northern Ireland that the government is pressing ahead with elsewhere. 

    Lord Tyler
    Image caption: Lord Tyler
  20. Motion introduced

    Northern Ireland election motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dunlop is introducing the Northern Ireland (Elections) (Amendment) (No.2) Order 2015 approval motion.

    The motion makes changes to the rules relating to elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly. 

  21. Report stage complete

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The EU Referendum Bill has passed its report stage in the House of Lords.

    Peers are now debating an approval motion on the Northern Ireland (Elections) (Amendment) (No.2) Order 2015. 

  22. Charity campaigning rules

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Anelay
    Image caption: Baroness Anelay

    Speaking for the government, Baroness Anelay says a charity cannot take part in party political campaigning, but can campaign on issues central to their existence.

    She adds that the charity regulators have signalled a willingness to cooperate on guidance for the referendum.

    Labour's Baroness Morgan withdraws the amendment. 

  23. SDLP MP rounds on Sinn Fein and the DUP

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Mark Durkan says that Sinn Fein opposed the UK government's welfare measures and said that "no deal was better than a bad deal".

    Now, Mr Durkan says, Sinn Fein says that "a bad deal is better than no deal" in making the recent political agreement, adding:

    Quote Message: The only thing that is consistent is their inconsistency and their lack of principle."

    The DUP, meanwhile, "are in something of a rollover position" on welfare reform, Mr Durkan adds. 

  24. Charities and the referendum

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have moved on to amendment 30, tabled by Labour's Baroness Morgan.

    The amendment is a probing amendment which seeks to clarify the role of charities in the EU referendum.

    The amendment would require the Electoral Commission to issue joint guidelines with the Charity Commission for England and Wales, the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland and the Office of the Scottish Regulator on how charities can engage with the referendum. 

  25. Amendments withdrawn

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Speaking for the government, Baroness Anelay says she will not support the amendments.

    She says she understands the concerns underlying the them, but that they are not appropriate for the bill.

    Lord Green withdraws the amendments.

  26. Opposition to 'speculative' amendments

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Collins
    Image caption: Lord Collins

    Speaking for the opposition, Lord Collins says they will not support Lord Green's amendments.

    He argues they are "speculative" and will not help to develop a "rational" debate about immigration and the EU.

    He adds that he will "challenge some of the assumptions about migration" during the referendum campaign. 

  27. Immigration and the EU

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Green
    Image caption: Lord Green

    Lord Kerr withdraws amendment 25, so peers move on to amendments 26 and 27, moved by crossbench peer Lord Green of Deddington.

    The amendments would require the government to publish reports on the levels of net migration and the effect of free movement on immigration if Britain stays in the EU.

    Read more about free movement within the EU here.

  28. DUP MP: Deal allows 'flexibility'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    DUP MP Jim Shannon says the agreement on welfare "does recognise Northern Ireland's special circumstances" and allows "flexibility".

    He adds that the devolution of corporation tax is a "game-changer", arguing that Northern Ireland has been at a "competitive disadvantage with the Republic of Ireland". 

    Jim Shannon
  29. Call on government to clarify implications of EU exit

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Morgan, who signed the amendment, points out that we still don't know which way the government will recommend people should vote.

    She says that since the government could recommend a vote to leave the EU, it should set out what leaving would mean more clearly. 

  30. Repercussions of a 'leave' vote

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Liddle
    Image caption: Lord Liddle

    Labour's Lord Liddle argues that EU countries will make concessions in order to get Britain to remain in the EU, and that there will be repercussions if the UK votes to leave.

    He says "the last thing in the world that other countries will want to see" is the UK negotiating a good trade deal with EU countries after having left the bloc. 

  31. 'Simply to save the blushes of Sinn Fein'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Margaret Ritchie

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie says that Westminster is being asked to legislate "simply to save the blushes and the electoral fortunes of Sinn Fein, with the acceptance and the acquiescence of the DUP".

    She says the bill will "facilitate in-work tax credit reductions and the DUP will be supporting that".

    Quote Message: There is something of an anomaly."
  32. Leaving the EU 'would be a disaster'

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Davies of Stamford
    Image caption: Lord Davies of Stamford

    Labour peer Lord Davies of Stamford says that it would be a "disaster" for Germany if the UK were to leave the EU, but it would be an "even bigger disaster" for the UK.

  33. 'Rewriting history'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The UUP's Danny Kinahan says the UK government's welfare reforms should be mitigated and claims that devolved government at Stormont is not working at present.

    Jeffrey Donaldson of the DUP says Mr Kinahan is trying to "rewrite history".

    Mr Donaldson, a former member of the UUP, says he "witnessed the failure of leadership of that party at critical times in Northern Ireland".

    He argues that the form of devolution that Mr Kinahan criticises is "what was created by the Ulster Unionist Party in 1998" with the Belfast Agreement.

    Jeffrey Donaldson
    Image caption: Jeffrey Donaldson
  34. 'A worse deal'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Danny Kinahan

    UUP MP Danny Kinahan says the bill enacts a "worse deal than what was on offer in the original Stormont House Agreement".

    He accuses the UK government of being "only prepared to listen to the two main parties" in Northern Ireland - the DUP and Sinn Fein.

    Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers intervenes to say that the deal "does reflect input from the UUP".

    "We are not listened to as much as we want," Mr Kinahan claims.

  35. 'Unnecessary' amendment

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Lamont says that the amendment invites the government to take one side in the referendum campaign, so should not pass.

    He says that government amendments passed earlier ensure that the government will be putting all the necessary information into the public domain.

  36. Commons 'can improve conditions in Northern Ireland'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sammy Wilson

    DUP MP Sammy Wilson says that "it is important that there is some urgency about this issue" after a deal has been reached.

    Quote Message: The House of Commons tonight can play a role in helping to improve conditions in Northern Ireland by passing this legislation."
  37. Consequences of leaving the EU

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Kerr
    Image caption: Lord Kerr

    Having completed the defence statement, peers have resumed debating the report state of the EU Referendum Bill.

    Crossbench peer Lord Kerr of Kinlochard is introducing an amendment which would require the government to publish a report setting out the possible consequences of withdrawing from the European Union.

    The report would have to be published four months prior to the referendum. 

  38. 'Very difficult' time for Northern Ireland

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Vernon Coaker

    Shadow Northern Ireland secretary Vernon Coaker says there had been a very difficult period in Northern Ireland before the deal.

    He says all parties involved in reaching an agreement "deserve credit for getting us to this point".

    Mr Coaker says Labour will not oppose the bill tonight, but adds:

    Quote Message: We have opposed much of the Tory government's welfare reform agenda and will continue to do so."
  39. 'Tailored' welfare system

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Ben Wallace says the government's intention is "not to impose the GB welfare system on Northern Ireland" but a "tailored" system agreed with Northern Ireland parties. 

  40. Nuclear safety

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Vanguard class submarine
    Image caption: Vanguard class submarine

    Labour peer Lord West says that running the Vanguard submarines for as long as is suggested in the defence statement is "high risk."

    Earl Howe says the advice they have received is that it will be "possible and safe" to run the submarines for this length of time. 

    Vanguard submarines carry Britain's nuclear weapons.

    Read more about Britain's nuclear arsenal here.

  41. Second reading debate opens

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Northern Ireland Minister Ben Wallace opens debate on the bill at second reading, which is a stage in which MPs discuss the general principles of the legislation.

    Committee stage, which allows amendments to be made, follows.

    After that, MPs consider the amended bill at report stage before final appraisal of the bill as a whole at third reading.

    Ben Wallace
  42. SDLP amendment defeated

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SDLP amendment falls by 276 votes to 7 - a thumping majority of 269.

    The timetable motion for the bill is agreed without a vote.

  43. Division in the Commons

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting on an amendment to the motion setting out the timetable for consideration of the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill.

    The amendment, tabled by the SDLP, would allow MPs to propose further amendments and new clauses to the bill.

  44. UK 'needs robust defences'

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Robertson, a former secretary general of Nato, says this is a time "to assert to our enemies and adversaries, both actual and potential, that this country still has got robust defences".

    Earl Howe says we have "a global power projection capability, second only in Nato to the United States".

  45. 'Abuse of parliamentary democracy'

    Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie wonders if "secret deals" were made when Northern Ireland's first minister and deputy first minister met the prime minister earlier in November.

    DUP MP Ian Paisley intervenes to say the SDLP has been "given every single opportunity to put the boot into Sinn Fein" over any delay in a deal, yet the SDLP "turn on" the government and other parties.

    Ms Ritchie calls the process around the bill "an abuse of parliamentary democracy".

    Fellow SDLP MP Mark Durkan indicates he wishes to move the party's amendment and the House divides.

  46. "Filling in the gaps"

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Reid says that much of the review is "filling in the gaps" left by previous government mistakes. 

  47. A 'karaoke bill'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Durkan

    Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) member Mark Durkan is moving an amendment to the allocation of time motion.

    Mr Durkan and his colleagues are unhappy with the speed at which the bill is set to become law and their amendment is seeking to allow the Speaker to select amendments, new clauses or new schedules other than just those tabled by the government to be voted on during the consideration of what he calls a "karaoke bill".

  48. Defence review: Main developments at a glance

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    F35 strike fighter

    Prime Minister David Cameron has announced an extra £12bn of spending on defence equipment, part of the government's £178bn overall defence equipment and support budget during the next decade.

    Here are some of the main developments in the government's Strategic Defence and Security Review, set out in the House of Commons.

    Read more here.

  49. Liberal Democrats on Syria

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Jolly says that the party will be setting out the circumstances under which they could support military action in Syria in the next few days.

  50. Labour welcomes new capability

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Touhig
    Image caption: Lord Touhig

    Labour shadow defence spokesperson Lord Touhig replies to the statement for the opposition.

    He notes at the beginning of his speech that it was a Labour government that ensured Britain had a nuclear deterrent.

    He welcomes the new aircraft, including the F35 strike fighters and the new maritime surveillance planes, but asks why it has taken so long to acquire them.

  51. Background to the Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After 10 weeks of negotiations, a deal has been reached between British and Irish governments and Northern Irish politicians to resolve the political crisis at Stormont.

    Last year's Stormont House Agreement fell on the issue of welfare reform, when Sinn Féin and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) refused to let the changes pass through the Northern Ireland Assembly.  

    The Fresh Start Agreement which was signed last week was supported by the two biggest parties in the Northern Ireland Assembly - Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP).

    Agreements have been made on the issues of paramilitarism, finance and welfare reform, but the legacy of the Troubles remains unresolved.

    The Northern Ireland Assembly has voted in favour of a motion to allow MPs at Westminster to implement changes to the welfare system in Northern Ireland - the motion was passed with 70 votes in favour and 22 votes against it.

  52. Defence review: PM could send 10,000 troops on to streets

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Up to 10,000 troops could be deployed on  British streets in the event of a Paris-style attack, David Cameron has said, as he announced plans for an extra £12bn for military equipment.

    The PM also said two 5,000-strong "strike brigades" would be created, as it was revealed the cost of renewing Trident could increase by £6bn.

    The extra spending also includes new F-35 jets and maritime patrol aircraft.

    Labour's Jeremy Corbyn said proposed police cuts would reduce UK security.

    Read more here.

  53. Statement over

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After just shy of two hours on his feet, the prime minister is allowed to leave the chamber as his statement on the SDSR come to an end.

    Debate now moves on the allocation of time motion for the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill.

    Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers is moving the motion which would allow all stages of the bill to be considered today,saying that this is "not ideal".

  54. Defence review

    Defence statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Earl Howe
    Image caption: Earl Howe

    Defence Minister Earl Howe is giving a statement on the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015.

    He says the UK is the only country in the world today which will meet the Nato target of spending 2% of its gross domestic product on defence and the United Nations target of spending 0.7% of our gross national income on development.

  55. Consultation on Trident

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steven Paterson

    The SNPs Steven Paterson joins his colleagues in the chamber in focusing his remarks on Trident.

    Mr Paterson calls for a "full consultation" with everyone in the country including the people of Scotland on the future of the UK's nuclear deterrent.

    The prime minister responds that the policy of having a nuclear deterrent has been government policy for decades, and tells Mr Paterson that Trident supports "many, many thousands of jobs in Scotland".

  56. Amendments pass

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government amendments 24A and 24B are agreed by the House of Lords.

    This means the government will produce a report on Britain's relationship with the EU and the result of the government renegotiation before the referendum vote.

    Peers move on to a repeat of the statement made in the Commons earlier on defence.

  57. Amendments allow an "informed" vote

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Anelay of St Johns
    Image caption: Baroness Anelay of St Johns

    Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay of St Johns is answering the debate on the  group of amendments around amendment 24A.

    The amendments require the government to produce a report on Britain's relationship with the EU prior to a referendum on membership. 

    She says the government has listened to parliament to bring forward amendments which will allow people to take an "informed" decision in the referendum.

  58. The EU and defence

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Angela Smith thanks the prime minister for the "important and comprehensive statement" and asks if he agrees that the defence of the UK is "enhanced by membership of the European Union". 

    The prime minister responds that membership of a "reformed EU" is a key part of Britain's security and that we should "recognise these friendships and partnerships that keep us safe".

    Conservative backbencher and veteran eurosceptic David Nuttall asks the prime minister whether he thinks membership of NATO is more important than membership of the EU for UK defence considerations.

    Mr Cameron responds by saying that reform of the EU will mean that the UK will not have to choose between the two.

  59. European superstate

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP's Lord Willoughby de Broke says the reason for the existence for the EU is to create a European superstate.

    He supports the amendments to publish information on Britain's relationship with the European Union before a referendum on membership.

  60. 'The truth is grey'

    EU Referendum Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Conservative Chancellor Lord Lamont  argues against what he calls the "black and white" nature of the amendments, saying "the truth is grey".

    Lord Lamont describes how fluid opinions to the EU are, giving the example of the left-right divide over the common market in the 70s and how the changing nature of the organisation over the years has affected people's opinions.

    Lord Lamont says "there is no such thing that as complete impartiality to the argument of these points".

    "There is no point in seeking out elusive impartiality that doesn't exist" he says, arguing instead that both sides should just be able to "slug it out".

    Lord Lamont
  61. PM 'keen' for Trident vote

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Brendan O'Hara says he is aware of rumours that the government does not plan to hold a vote on Trident replacement.

    "I'm very keen that we should have a vote," David Cameron responds.

  62. About the SDSR

    From BBC Analysis and Research

    Along with its sister-publication, the National Security Strategy, the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) sets out the government’s thinking on the threats faced by Britain, what is needed to combat them and the subsequent configuration of the Armed Forces.

    In response to the Paris terrorist attacks, the Government announced that MI5, M16 and GCHQ would each receive an increase of 15%.

    The last SDSR was carried out in 2010 and led to considerable cuts to the Armed Forces, both in terms of personnel and equipment. The coalition government promised to publish a review every five years. The Labour government published its first and last SDSR in 1998.

  63. 'Entrance strategy compelling'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Nigel Evans says an "exit strategy" from Syria is important, "but for me the entrance strategy became compelling with what happened on the streets of Paris".

  64. Fact vs Opinion

    EU referendum bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Grocott is warning the chamber of the need to distinguish between "what is factual, unarguable objective information and what is a matter of opinion".

    Lord Grocott argues that the language of amendment 24C allows for debate over possible interpretations of the consequences of EU withdrawal. This, he says, would cause problems for civil servants trying to implement the provisions of the bill into policy.

    The mover of the amendment, Lord Hannay rises to disagree with Lord Grocott, saying his amendment contains "important information that is not intended to enter the speculative realm".

  65. 'Ulster is there'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    DUP MP Jeffrey Donaldson offer Northern Ireland as an alternative home for Trident if the SNP succeeds in removing it from Scotland.

    "We have lots of lochs and lots of ports and if the government needs another home for Trident, Ulster is there."

    David Cameron says he and Mr Donaldson are "united in hoping that never happens" as both oppose Scottish independence.

  66. 'Exit strategy'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Dennis Skinner asks the prime minister if he has an "exit strategy" in Syria, adding that "no-one else ever has" in other recent conflicts.

    David Cameron says an exit strategy would be "a government in Syria that represents all of its people" and claims he delivered an exit strategy in Afghanistan.

  67. MP claims people will 'welcome' Army on streets

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Bob Stewart, a former Army officer, claims that people will welcome the deployment of the Army on the streets, adding that they were deployed in Northern Ireland "for 40 years".

    David Cameron says there have been "archane and historical barriers" preventing the Army being used, and also thinks they will be welcomed.

  68. 'Vital defence industry'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UKIP's Douglas Carswell calls for defence procurement decisions to be taken to provide the best equipment for the armed forces and "not to enrich a cartel of defence contractors".

    The prime minister says it is balance between "swift" procurement and having "a care to Britain's vital defence industry".

  69. Call for 'time to debate Syria'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Yvette Cooper calls for the House to have adequate time to fully consider UK military action in Syria.

    David Cameron says there will be a full day's debate followed by a vote 

  70. MPs stand to be called

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons
    Image caption: MPs stand in the hope of being called to respond to the prime minister's statement
  71. Impartial information on the renegotiation

    EU referendum bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Hamilton of Epsom says that "nobody can pretend" that any information published by the government about the EU renegotiation would be impartial.

    He adds that an amendment set down by Liberal Democrat Lord Hannay calling for the government to set out the costs of leaving the EU is inappropriate. He argues that he could have put down a similar amendment demanding the government sets out the benefits of leaving the EU, and that he did not do so because it would have been rejected on the grounds of bias.

    Lord Hamilton of Epsom
    Image caption: Lord Hamilton of Epsom
  72. Statement welcomed by DUP

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    DUP Westminster leader Nigel Dodds refers to comments by David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn that a government's first duty is the protection of its citizens.

    "Can I welcome that the prime minister at least is living up to that requirement in the House today" he says.

    Mr Dodds calls for guarantees that the planned new aircraft carriers "will be deployed as strike carriers".

  73. 'Unsuited to government'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron tells Angus Robertson that military ships would not be built in Scotland if it was not part of the UK and "did not have the massive resources of the Royal Navy".

    He calls the SNP "wholly opposed to Trident and therefore wholly unsuited to government".

    "We are in government!" shout some SNP MPs.

    The party forms the devolved Scottish government in Edinburgh.

  74. SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson

    SDSR

    Angus Robertson
  75. Labour leader's response

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn
  76. 'Super expensive vanity project'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angus Robertson tries to make a distinction between what he calls "sensible, necessary defence expenditure" and Trident, which he calls "the elephant in the room".

    He calls the nuclear weapons system "a super expensive vanity project that does not deter", adding that most Scottish parliamentarians want to scrap it.

  77. SNP response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson responds, describing his party in the Commons as "the effective opposition".

    He accuses the prime minister of deciding to "scrap and waste the entire fleet of Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft", leaving the UK with a "capability gap".

    The lack of such aircraft led to the government having to "urge Scottish fishing vessels to report" on possible Russian naval activity, Mr Robertson claims.

    He further accuses ministers of reneging on promises made before the Scottish independence referendum on military spending in Scotland.

  78. PM at the despatch box

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron in the Commons
  79. Peers with pensions

    EU referendum bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP's Lord Pearson of Rannoch mentions his "regret that noble lords in receipt of a forfeit-able EU pension have not seen fit to declare it in any of our proceedings so far."

    Lord Hannay of Chiswick, who moved the amendment, intervenes to say that he does not receive any such pension and asks Lord Pearson to clarify the remark.

    Lord Pearson says that if Lord Hannay receives no such pension he has nothing to clarify.

    Lord Pearson
    Image caption: Lord Pearson
  80. Cameron attacks Corbyn

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron claims that Jeremy Corbyn questioned the level of armed forces "six months ago" and is now suggesting more uses for them.

    He says it is part of the role of ambassadors to advise on human rights, dismissing Mr Corbyn's call for a human rights adviser in every embassy.

    The PM insists the government is "determined" to learn from previous conflicts.

    On Libya, he says he will not apologise for "preventing Colonel Gadaffi from murdering his own people".

  81. 'Lessons' from Libya

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn asks if the prime minister has learned lessons from intervention in Libya in the form of air strikes.

    The Labour leader says the country has seen "appalling chaos, persistent violence and the stregthening of ISIL".

    He says a Labour review will aim to learn from "Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya".

  82. 'Inequality, poverty, disease'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn argues that inequality, poverty, and disease, as well as water and food security, contribute to global instability.

    The Labour leader pays tribute to the armed forces but suggests that tax credit cuts "breach the spirit of the armed forces covenant" as they could leave some lower-ranking military personnel worse off.

  83. 'Public will not accept police cuts'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn replies for the opposition, saying that "the first duty of a state is to protect its own citizens".

    Labour supports more spending on the security services, he says, but "the public will not understand, nor accept, cuts to frontline policing".

    David Cameron
    Image caption: David Cameron setting out the security and defence review
    Jeremy Corbyn
    Image caption: Jeremy Corbyn replying for the opposition
  84. Fighting disease

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron announces more funding to fight infectious diseases such as Ebola and to tackle climate change.

    This will help the world's poorest people and help respond to "emerging crises overseas" which could threaten UK security, the PM says.

  85. 'New generation of drones'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron announces more anti-terrorist police and a "new generation of surveillance drones".

  86. Strike brigades confirmed

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The PM confirms two new Army "strike brigades" and new maritime patrol aircraft.

    Mr Cameron adds that the UK will maintain the "ultimate insurance policy" of a submarine-based nuclear capability.

    He describes the investment as and act of "clear-eyed self-interest" to protect the country.

  87. Further statement on Thursday

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron says he will make another statement to MPs on Thursday, responding to the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, and making a case for military action in Syria as well as Iraq.

    david cameron
  88. Government amendment

    EU referendum bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Anelay of St Johns
    Image caption: Baroness Anelay of St Johns

    Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay of St Johns is explaining that the government has agreed there is a need for information about the outcome of the renegotiation to be made public before a referendum vote.

    As a result the government has moved two amendments requiring it to produce a report setting what is agreed in the renegotiation, and the government's opinion on the renegotiation.

    The report would also set out the legal obligations and rights arising from Britain's membership of the European Union. 

  89. 'The world is more dangerous'

    SDSR

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Cameron says this year has seen "the worst terrorist attack against the British people since 7/7 on the beaches of Tunisia".

    As well as the "evil death cult" of the so called Islamic State Group, the PM says, there is the situation in Ukraine and cyber attacks.

    "The world is more dangerous today than it was five years ago," Mr Cameron argues.

  90. Strategic Defence and Security Review statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The prime minister begins his statement on the national security strategy and the Strategic Defence and Security Review.

  91. What would Winston do?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Julian Lewis, the Conservative MP who chairs the Commons Defence Committee, makes a thinly-veiled plea for the UK to co-operate with Russia against so-called Islamic state.

    "Churchill's great strength was that he knew when to recognise which was the greater of two evils," Mr Lewis argues.

    That included working with some "unsavoury allies against a common, deadly enemy", he adds.

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon says Winston Churchill's greatest strength was "to be determined to do something about it" when faced with a threat to the UK.

  92. EU renegotiation

    EU referendum bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Image of Europe overlayed with EU flag

    The Lords have moved on to the report stage of the EU referendum bill.

    They are discussing a groups of amendments which would require the government to publish information about the results of the renegotiation of Britain's membership of the European Union before a referendum vote.

    The Conservatives' election manifesto promised to hold a referendum (a nationwide vote) on whether or not the UK should stay in or leave the European Union. 

    Before the vote the government will try to renegotiate the terms of our membership of the EU.

    Read more here.

  93. Dangerous cyclists

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Wills asks what action is being taken to increase compliance by cyclists with traffic laws and regulations.

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad says cyclists have a duty to comply with the law, and enforcement is the responsibility of the police.

  94. Pension changes affecting women

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Bakewell
    Image caption: Baroness Bakewell

    Baroness Bakewell asks what plans there are to compensate women deprived of their expected pensions by the increase in the state pension age under the Pensions Act 2011.  

    Minister Baroness Altmann says "there are no plans" to change government pension policy.

    In 1995 the government decided that the pension ages of both men and women would be equalised by 2020. Previously, women retired at 60, while men retired at 65.

    In 2011, state pension ages were raised at an even faster rate.

    Some of those born between April 1951 and 1960 will not qualify for a pension until the age of 66.

    Baroness Bakewell has been campaigning for compensation for the women who thought they could collect their pension earlier than is now the case.

    Read more here.

  95. Court orders UK to cut NO2 air pollution

    From the BBC News website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The UK's highest court has ruled that the government must take immediate action to cut air pollution.

    The ruling is a significant victory for campaigners, who began legal action after the UK breached EU limits for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the air.

    Diesel vehicles are a key source of so-called NOx emissions, and NO2 is linked to a range of respiratory illnesses.

    The Environment Department said work had already been started on revised plans to meet EU targets on NO2.

    Read more here.

  96. Air quailty

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer, Baroness Jones of Whitchurch asks how the Supreme Court’s ruling that United Kingdom air quality should be brought within legal limits as soon as possible will be met.  

    Defra Minister Lord Gardiner of Kimble says the government will submit a plan to cut emissions in the non compliant areas to the European Commission by 31st December.  

  97. 'Embarrassing' lack of aircraft

    Defence questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Both shadow defence secretary Maria Eagle and SNP defence spokesman Brendan O'Hara refer to reports that Canadian and French maritime patrol aircraft were involved in the search for a Russian submarine at the weekend.

    The RAF currently has no maritime patrol aircraft of its own, and Ms Eagle calls on ministers to set out exactly when new aircraft will be available.

    Mr O'Hara says that a "maritime" nation such as the UK relying on its Canadian and French allies is "deeply embarrassing".

    Defence Ministers Philip Dunne and Julian Brazier urge the MPs to wait until the prime minister's statement at around 15.30 GMT.

  98. Airport expansion

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad
    Image caption: Transport Minister Lord Ahmad

    Baroness Randerson asks the government what their assessment is of the potential impact of additional capacity at either Heathrow or Gatwick airports on the Northern Powerhouse project.

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad says more airport capacity in the south of England will not draw economic activity away from the north, and notes that Manchester airport has already had its capacity expanded.

    Read more about the Northern Powerhouse here.

  99. Conservative peer introduced

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Willetts
    Image caption: Lord Willetts

    The Conservative Lord Willetts is being introduced to the House of Lords.

    Between April 1992 and March 2015 he served as the Member of Parliament for Havant, and was the universities minister from May 2010 to July 2014.

  100. Defence questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nick Smith

    Defence questions open with one from Labour's Nick Smith, asking what is being done to ensure that the UK defence industry benefits from procurement decisions.

    Mr Smith wants to know why the Army's new Ajax armoured vehicles are to be built using Swedish, not British, steel.

    Defence Minister Philip Dunne tells him that "the contractors determine the materials", taking in conserations including "cost, time and quality".

    No UK steelmaker was able to "meet the prime contractor's requirements", he adds.

  101. Liberal Democrat peer introduced

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Beith
    Image caption: Lord Beith

    The Liberal Democrat Lord Beith is being introduced to the House of Lords. 

    Between November 1973 and March 2015 he served as the Member of Parliament for Berwick-upon-Tweed.

  102. 'Strike brigades' to be created by 2025

    From the BBC News website

    Soldier

    Two 5,000-strong "strike brigades" that can be rapidly deployed are to be created by 2025 to help the UK respond to "diverse" threats, the PM is to say.

    David Cameron will give details of an additional £12bn of equipment spending, as he outlines the Strategic Defence and Security Review in the Commons.

    The extra spending will include a new fleet of maritime patrol aircraft.

    He will say the priority is to tackle state-based threats and terrorism, including so-called Islamic state (IS).

    Read more.

  103. NI welfare reform: Commons to push legislation through

    From the BBC News website

    Welfare reform legislation for Northern Ireland agreed in last week's political deal at Stormont is due to be pushed through the House of Commons later.

    The bill is then expected to be put before the House of Lords on Tuesday.

    The Northern Ireland Assembly voted in favour of a motion on Wednesday to allow MPs to implement changes to the welfare system in Northern Ireland.

    The motion was passed with 70 MLAs voting in favour, while 22 members voted opposed it. It followed a new agreement between the Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Féin, Stormont's two largest parties, and the British and Irish governments.

    Read more.

    Northern Ireland agreement
  104. Business today

    House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our coverage of the House of Lords.

    The day begins with the introduction of two more new peers, the Liberal Democrat Lord Beith and the Conservative Lord Willetts.

    There will then be questions on airport expansion, air quality, changes to state pensions, and traffic laws.

    After that there is a repeat of a statement made in the Commons about the National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015.

    The main business of the day will be the final day of debate on the report stage of the European Union Referendum Bill.

    At the end of the day there will be a sort debate on a motion concerning elections in Northern Ireland.

  105. Today in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our live coverage of the day in Westminster.

    The Commons gets underway with defence questions, then Prime Minister David Cameron makes a statement to MPs on the government's Strategic Defence and Security Review.

    Among the announcements expected are the establishment of two new army "strike brigades" that can be rapidly deployed to counter threats, and new maritime patrol aircraft.

    The main legislation for the day will be all stages of the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill, which follows a deal between major parties and the UK and Irish governments.

    Finally, Conservative MP Maggie Throup has an adjournment debate on the use of antibiotics.