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Summary

  1. The day in both houses was given over to bills put forward by members and not the government.
  2. In the Commons, MPs debated compulsory emergency first aid education.
  3. There were two urgent questions, one on junior doctors, the second on transgender prisoners.
  4. In the Lords, peers discussed bills on Mesothelioma, subterranean development and planning.

Live Reporting

By Chris Davies and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords has adjourned, and will return on Monday at 14:30 GMT.

    The main business will be continued detailed debate on the EU Referendum Bill.

    Thanks for visiting our page, we will be back on Monday. 

  2. Bill passes to committee stage

    Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Lexden says he's "greatly heartened" by the enthusiasm with which his bill has been greeted, and it passes to committee stage.

  3. Bill has 'good intentions'

    Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams of Trafford, says the government recognises the "good intentions" behind the bill. She says ministers want to see communities that residents can be proud of, and that one of the reasons people are often hostile to development in their area is poor design.

    She says that the government has already legislated to give communities more control of their areas through "neighbourhood planning".

  4. Planning system a 'short term model'

    Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher the Earl of Lytton tells the House that the current planning system is a "short term model" which needs to be changed if the country is to build better homes and public spaces. Community involvement in planning is the best way of producing pride local areas, he says.

    He says it is a bill that is "well worth supporting".

  5. The Commons adjournes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons has finished for the week.

    It will return at 14:30 GMT on Monday with defence questions, and a statement on the National Security Strategy.

    That will be followed by legislative scrutiny of the Northern Ireland (Welfare Reform) Bill, and an adjournment debate on the use of antibiotics in primary care.

  6. Funding not the only issue

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business, Innovation and Skills Minister George Freeman answers the adjournment debate.

    He says funding is not the only consideration in providing high quality further education.

    George Freeman
    Image caption: George Freeman
  7. High quality adult education

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Joan Ryan asks that a Minister visits her constituency of Enfield to see the high quality work colleges in the area do to provide adult education.

  8. Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Lexden
    Image caption: Lord Lexden

    Conservative Lord Lexden is introducing his Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill. It would create pilots for neighbourhood forums to help direct local planning policy.

    He says his bill has support from across the House because his bill follows on from both Conservative and Labour policy, and can help provide housing of a type that people would want to buy. He claims that the type of developments that win planning permission "are not the type of home people want".

    He says that too often the choices presented to local communities are "superficial", and that people are more likely to support new developments in their area when they are genuinely consulted.

  9. Adult skills budgets in Enfield

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Joan Ryan
    Image caption: Joan Ryan

    Labour MP Joan Ryan is introducing her adjournment debate on adult skills budgets in Enfield.

    Read more here.

  10. Debate runs out of time

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle calls time on the Compulsory Emergency First Aid Education Bill. The House will continue the debate on the 29th January.

    The bill will go to the bottom of the private members's bills queue, so it has effectively failed to pass.

  11. Government not persuaded by bill

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sam Gyimah
    Image caption: Sam Gyimah

    Education Minister Sam Gyimah answers the debate.

    He says schools are encouraged to buy defibrillators by departmental guidance. He says that since schools are often the venue for community sports events this is an advisable measure.

    He argues that adding first aid to the national curriculum is not the best way to ensure that people are well trained in first aid.  

  12. Labour 'bemused' at Health Secretary's conduct

    Junior doctor contract statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Hunt of Kings Heath says he is "bemused" by the conduct of the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt. He says statistics used to raise concerns about the safety of the NHS at weekends have been selectively used. He urges the government to talk to junior doctors.

    Minister Lord Prior says a strike is "the last thing we want" and that patients will be the real victims. He says the door is open for talks with junior doctors at any time.

  13. Junior doctor contract urgent question repeat

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton repeats a statement made earlier in the Commons in response to an urgent question from the shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander.

    Yesterday it was reported that 98% of junior doctors had voted to strike in protest at the government's proposals to change the terms of junior doctor contracts.

    Lord Prior says the government has "repeatedly appealed" to the British Medical Association to return to the negotiating table.

  14. Bill passes to Committee stage

    Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    After a short summing up speech by Lords Dubs, Lords vote to give the bill a second reading and commit it to a committee of the whole House.

  15. Schools should be free to decide what to teach

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After speaking for twenty minutes Conservative MP David Nuttall concludes by saying schools should be free to decided if they teach first aid "unhindered by legislation."

  16. Government takes concerns 'most seriously'

    Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams of Trafford
    Image caption: Baroness Williams of Trafford

    Baroness Williams of Trafford is responding to the debate for the government. She says she takes "most seriously" concerns raised by members, and appreciates the anger and distress that basement developments can cause. However she says that basement developments can address problems of lack of space without having to change or alter a building.

    She says a lot of the provisions in the bill already exist across a range of legislation.

  17. "Blank cheque"

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David Nuttall says the bill has no explanatory notes, and complains that MPs are being asked to sign a "blank cheque".

  18. Teachers' workload

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Sheryll Murray argues that her time spent working in a doctors' surgery taught her that CPR training needs to be regularly updated to keep up with the most recent medical advice.

    She is against making first aid education compulsory, partly due to worries about adding to teachers' workload..

  19. MPs urged to take bill to a vote

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After speaking for 52 minutes, Conservative MP Philip Davies finishes his contribution.

    His Conservative colleague Will Quince says he "really strongly" supports this bill, and he would like to see it go to a vote.

    Will Quince
    Image caption: Will Quince
  20. Leafy streets become 'industrial zones'

    Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher The Earl of Lytton says that the building of basements in so-called "iceberg homes" results in small residential streets becoming the site of "major works" that can turn leafy streets into "what is effectively an industrial zone for a decade or more".

    Yesterday the Daily Mail reported on plans for what is believed to be London's biggest single-storey basement in Primrose Hill. The basement would have a 65-foot long swimming pool, a banquet hall and a cinema.

  21. "A matter of life and death"

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Roger Gale
    Image caption: Sir Roger Gale

    Conservative MP Sir Roger Gale intervenes on Philip Davies to say that the bill would receive detailed scrutiny in its committee stage, which would happen if it passes its current second reading stage.

    Sir Roger says "given that this is a matter of life and death my honourable friend might just allow this to have a second reading".

    Philip Davies says he disagrees with the principle of compulsory first aid education, so will not just let it through.

  22. The bill is a "farce" without assessment

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies says that the bill is a "farce" if it does not contain a mechanism for assessing if pupils have learnt to perform first aid correctly after receiving training.

  23. 'Burden' of teacher training

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Philip Davies says that ensuring teachers are trained to give the first aid courses would be a drain on schools' resources.

    He argues that sending teachers off do do first aid courses is a "burden they shouldn't have to suffer." 

  24. Long speeches

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies has been speaking since 12:47 GMT. 

    During a Friday sittings of the Commons, there is no time limit to member's contributions, unless they run foul of the chair for deviation or repetition.

    If they are still debating when the House adjourns at 14:30, then the bill will not pass its second reading and will not become law.

    Read BBC Parliamentary Correspondent Mark D'arcy's take on the situation here.

  25. Basements 'sweeping from borough to borough'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers will now move on to the Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill, introduced by Labour's Lord Dubs. 

    The bill aims to make it harder for developers and homeowners to obtain planning permission for underground basements.

    Lord Dubs tells peers that such developments are currently "sweeping through from borough to borough" in London. 

    He adds that such developments often cause misery to neighbours and businesses due to the noise, but that this this alone is not a reason for local authorities to ban them. 

    Instead, he says his Bill would introduce provisions allowing authorities to "take on board" such considerations in assessing applications. 

    Lord Dubs
  26. Raising awareness

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Summing up the debate, Lord Alton of Liverpool says that "shining a light" on mesothelioma is a worthwhile endeavour, given the low profile of the disease. 

    He adds that it is important to realise it is not just a disease that is "just confined to heavy industry". 

    He tells peers that "the only way" that parliamentarians have of raising awareness about issues such as these is through "bills of this sort". 

    At a vote, peers decide to give the bill a second reading, meaning it will now pass to committee stage. 

    Lord Alton of Liverpool
  27. 'Salami slicing' of school time

    First aid education bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Philip Davies says he is concerned that "salami slicing" bits of school time for compulsory education like first aid training could mean there is not enough time left for the core academic curriculum. 

  28. Government 'not predisposed' to support bill

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Prior says the government is "not predisposed to support" this bill.

    He says the problem isn't necessarily funding, but a lack of applications for funding. The work being funded "is of high quality", he adds. 

    He says the government opposes a levy on the insurance industry. 

    He points out that not everyone who is eligible for compensation actually claims from the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme (DMPS), and suggests that money for research could be drawn from that. 

  29. Ministers should not 'stick their noses in' with schools

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Philip Davies says he agrees that first aid is a "very important life skill".

    However, he questions whether it should really be the place of ministers to "stick their nose in at every turn" by telling teachers what they should have to teach. 

    He adds that if introducing first aid teaching were easy, they might expect more schools to already be planning to adopt it. 

    He says that instead, he believes in trusting teachers to decide whether incorporating such lessons is possible or meets the needs of their pupils.  

    Philip Davies
  30. Support for passage of bill

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Education Minister Nic Dakin says that he supports the Bill in principle, and is in favour of allowing it to progress to committee stage.  

    He also notes that the bill has been signed by members from four different parties, demonstrating "strong-cross party support" for it. 

    He says the committee stage will allow the legislation to be "looked at in more detail". 

    Nic Dakin
  31. Not a 'legacy disease'

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton says "clearly mesothelioma is a terrible condition" with "no known cure".

    He acknowledges that it is not a "legacy disease" and that there are likely to be people suffering from it for twenty or thirty more years.

    He says the four largest insurance companies have made a research donation of £4m between them, and Zurich and Aviva have recently added another £1m. 

    Lord Prior of Brampton
    Image caption: Lord Prior of Brampton
  32. Fears over 'tick-box exercise'

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Craig Whittaker says that research from the St. John Ambulance service shows that just 6% of the population have the skills and confidence needed to respond to a first-aid emergency situation. 

    Thus, he says that as well as providing training in schools, it is important to raise awareness about first aid more generally, including in voluntary clubs and places of worship.

    He adds that the bill is a "bit premature" given that the government is currently undertaking a review of personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE) in schools, of which first aid training forms a part. 

    He says that for the moment, teachers are "best placed" to decide on what is appropriate in their schools. 

    He also says he fears that giving schools a "prescriptive" list of compulsory subjects would become a "tick-box exercise". 

    Craig Whittaker
  33. Current funding 'not sufficient'

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hunt of Kings Heath
    Image caption: Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

    The final speeches from the front benches have started.

    Lord Hunt of Kings Heath, shadow health spokesperson, says he hopes the minister Lord Prior can update the House on the state of mesothelioma research. He notes the differing assessments of the state of research in the UK given by various peers, and hopes for clarification.

    He says that current funding pledged for research by the insurance industry "does not seem sufficient".

  34. Political focus needed

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Murphy says the survival rate for mesothelioma has only gone up by 2% in thirty years, which makes clear the need for more research.

    She says that what is "really required" is not just money but a political focus on tackling on the disease.

  35. 'Challenge' to the insurance industry

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Howarth of Newport says the bill is a challenge to insurers to put more money into mesothelioma research voluntarily.

    "I hope that the industry will respond, and if not I will support the bill", he says.

  36. Who answers the questions

    Points of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker Bercow
    Image caption: Speaker Bercow

    Labour's Heidi Alexander asks what she can do to get Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt to answer her urgent questions in person.

    Speaker Bercow says it is not a matter for him to decide which minister answers a question, so he cannot call Jeremy Hunt but that "I hope whatever he's doing he's enjoying himself."

    MPs go back to debating private members' bills.

  37. "Personally shameful"

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Sarah Champion says "I find it personally shameful" that during trans awareness week we are not celebrating people's right to choose their gender, but we are talking about a trans person's' suicide.

  38. Rehabilitation

    Urgent questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Andrew Selous says that "rehabilitation is at the heart of everything we do" in the prison service, and that trans people should be in an environment where this is possible.

    Andrew Selous
    Image caption: Andrew Selous
  39. Prison suicides

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Catherine Smith
    Image caption: Catherine Smith

    From Labour's frontbench, Cat Smith asks what steps are being taken to address prison suicides.

    She asks if the policy guidelines for transgender prisoners are adequate, and if they are being properly applied.

  40. Transgender woman Vicky Thompson found dead

    From the BBC News website

    A transgender woman who told her friends she would kill herself if she was sent to a male prison has been found dead in jail.

    Vicky Thompson, 21, was being held at Armley, Leeds, where she was pronounced dead on Friday.

    Friends of Thompson, who was born male but had identified as female since her mid-teens, said she had asked to be sent to a female prison.

    An investigation into her death has been launched, the Prison Service said.

    Read more here.

  41. 'Just £800,000 a year' for research

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Freyberg
    Image caption: Lord Freyberg

    Crossbench peer Lord Freyberg talks about his sister, who died of mesothelioma. She was in her early fifties, and a woman, so an incredibly unusual victim of the disease, which usually afflicts men in their 70s. He says no-one knows how she contracted the disease.

    He says that a feature of his sister's illness was the lack of research into the condition. He cites British Lung Foundation figures estimating just £800,000 a year is invested in mesothelioma research, compared to £9m a year for skin cancers.

  42. Trans issues in prisons

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Cat Smith asks for a statement on trans prisoners, after the death of transgender woman Vicky Thompson in a male prison.

    Prisons Minister Andrew Selous answers

  43. 'Absolute disgrace'

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Clive Efford says it is an "absolute disgrace" that Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is not answering the urgent question.

    Minister Alistair But says that Mr Hunt is working on "contingency plans" if the strike goes ahead.

  44. Government urged not to 'give in'

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Philip Davies says that strike action is never a substitute for negotiation, and urges the government not to "give in."

    Minister Alistair Burt says that he hopes negotiations can resume before the action takes place.

  45. "Picking a fight" with doctors

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Clive Lewis asks why the government is "picking a fight" with NHS staff just before the winter.

    Minister Alistair Burt says the government has not just picked a fight with doctors, and notes that the contract negotiations have been going on for three and a half years.

  46. Junior doctors row: 98% vote in favour of strikes

    From the BBC News website

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Doctor's scrubs

    Junior doctors in England have overwhelmingly voted in favour of going on strike in their dispute with ministers over a new contract.

    Some 98% voted in favour of a full strike and 99% in favour of action just short of a full strike.

    The first walk-out will start on 1 December with another two dates earmarked for later in the month.

    Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the doctors' decision was "very, very disappointing" news.

  47. Asbestos 'right beneath us in this building'

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Ribeiro, one of a number of doctors and surgeons who have spoken so far, encourages Peers to take a tour of the Houses of Parliament's basement. It is, he says, filled with asbestos. "It is something we have right beneath us in this building" he says.

    He says there are still questions to be asked about the condition. He raises the case of a woman who died whose only asbestos exposure was from washing her husband's work overalls. Why did her much more exposed husband not die?

    "Only research can answer these questions", he says.

    Lord Ribeiro
    Image caption: Lord Ribeiro
  48. Conciliation service

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Nic Dakin urges the Department of Health to take the dispute to the conciliation service Acas

    Minister Alistair Burt says that they have attempted using an independent body before, and it was not successful. 

  49. NHS safety

    Urgent question

    Health Minister Alistair Burt
    Image caption: Health Minister Alistair Burt

    Health Minister Alistair Burt calls on the Labour front bench to say it does not support strike action by doctors.

    He says NHS safety is a prime concern, and argues that the new junior doctors contract is supposed to increase safety at weekends. 

  50. "Angry and sad"

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander says the situation makes her "angry and sad"

    She says the way the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has run the negotiations is "appalling", and that "negotiation by press release" is not the way to handle the situation.

  51. "Entirely avoidable" strike

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health minister Alistair Burt says it is "regrettable that junior doctors have voted for action which will put patients at risk."

    He says the strike is "entirely avoidable"

  52. Junior Doctors

    Urgent Question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander asks an urgent question on current dispute over the junior doctors contract.

    Junior doctors have voted for strike action over the issue.

    Health Minister Alistair Burt is answering

    Read more here.

  53. Mesothelioma 'astonishingly hard to deal with'

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Winston
    Image caption: Lord Winston

    Labour's Lord Winston, better known as Professor Robert Winston, says that conditions like mesothelioma are "astonishingly hard to deal with".

    He challenges the assertion by Lord Alton of Liverpool that mesothelioma is not given as much attention as other cancer, and cites current studies by Cancer Research UK and others into treatments for mesothelioma and related conditions.

    "We are doing research in this country, whether we're doing enough remains for other people to decide" he says.

  54. Better ways to address the issue

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Robert Jenrick
    Image caption: Robert Jenrick

    Conservative Robert Jenrick says this bill is one where "our hearts, our instinct, tells us we should support the bill, but on closer examination, particularly talking to people on the ground who will have to implement this bill, our heads tell us that there may be better ways to address this issue."

    He says he asked headteachers in his constituency what they thought of the bill.

    He reports that they usually supported the principle of teaching first aid, but none were in favour of it being a compulsory part of the curriculum 

  55. 'Three quarters' of schools have asbestos

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Finlay of Llandaff
    Image caption: Baroness Finlay of Llandaff

    Crossbencher Baroness Finlay of Llandaff says she wants to highlight mesothelioma as a problem not just for today but for the future. She says that more than three quarters of school buildings have asbestos in them.

    She adds that research has shown that children exposed to asbestos have a far higher risk of eventually developing mesothelioma than adults do.

    The fact that asbestos is still present in our public buildings means research is ever more important, she says.

    Asbestos was used for many years to insulate walls, roofs and pipes in public and private buildings.

  56. Defibrillator training needed

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    defibrillator

    Labour's Liz McInnes says that if first aid were taught in schools it would become "normalised", and people would be more confident performing it.

    She says without education, public defibrillators are just "wall decoration."

  57. Helpless by-standers

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Rachael Maskell tells the House about her experience of administering CPR to a stranger.

    She says she came across a victim surrounded by people who did not know what to do. She noted that no one in the crowd had even had the confidence to call an ambulance.

    She says that if she were one of those by-standers she would have felt helpless, and urges the House to support the bill.  

  58. 'Something can be done' about mesothelioma

    Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alton of Liverpool
    Image caption: Lord Alton of Liverpool

    The bill is being introduced by Crossbencher Lord Alton of Liverpool. He tells the house that the UK has the highest rate of mesothelioma in the world and calls the 2014 act a "partial and very welcome" response.  

    He says very little money is spent on research in the UK compared to cancers with a similar mortality rate. 

    He adds that something can be done about it, and it is not enough to rely on private donations and "modest" government contributions.

    According to Cancer Research UK, the number of mesothelioma cases are expected to "rise sharply for the next few years". 

    The charity attributes this expected rise to the high use of asbestos in industry from the second world war to the 1970s. 

  59. Good CPR quick to teach

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Dr Tania Mathias says she is "surprised" that only one in four schools teaches first aid.

    She says she is "convinced" you can teach good CPR in half an hour.

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid technique that can be used if someone is not breathing properly or if their heart has stopped.

    Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body.

    Find out more here

    Dr Tania Mathias
    Image caption: Dr Tania Mathias
  60. Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The bill aims to compel insurance companies to pay into a fund for medical research into Mesothelioma, a type of cancer that starts in the lungs and is strongly linked to exposure to asbestos. 

    Around 2,600 people in the UK are diagnosed with the disease every year.  

    The Mesothelioma Act 2014 already compels insurance companies to fund the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme (DMPS) for sufferers of the disease. 

    This bill would add a research levy of 1% to the DMPS, bringing about £3.5m in extra research funding. 

    It is estimated that insurers would pay out about £350m over the first ten years. 

  61. CPR skills being taught in schools

    From the BBC News website

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The British Heart Foundation says lives are being lost because most people do not feel confident enough to attempt resuscitation.

    30,000 people a year suffer cardiac arrests outside of hospitals, but only 10% survive.

    Find out more here.

  62. Urgent questions

    Updated Commons timetable

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There will be two urgent questions in the Commons today.

    The first is from Shadow Health Secretary Heidi Alexander, on negotiations for a new junior doctor contract.

    Yesterday, junior doctors in England voted overwhelmingly in favour of going on strike in their dispute with the government over the proposed new contract terms. 

    The second is from Shadow Minister for Women Cat Smith, on trans people in UK prisons.

    These will take place after 11:00 GMT. 

  63. Girl Guide training

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Anne-Marie Trevelyan
    Image caption: Anne-Marie Trevelyan

    Conservative Anne-Marie Trevelyan says she will support the bill. 

    She says she was taught first aid at the Girl Guides, and has used that training three times in her life, twice at serious car crashes. 

  64. Today in the House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Today the Lords will consider three private member's bills at Second Reading. First they will consider the Mesothelioma (Amendment) Bill.

    Secondly they will debate the Planning (Subterranean Development) Bill, introduced by Labour's Lord Dubs. The bill aims to make it harder for developers and homeowners to obtain planning permission for underground basements.

    The final bill of the day will be Lord Lexden's Direct Planning (Pilot) Bill. The bill wants to create pilots for neighbourhood forums to be allowed to help direct planning policy. 

  65. "Act of humanity"

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Teresa Pearce quotes the International Red Cross, who say "first aid is not just about techniques, it is an act of humanity, and therefore is a key responsibility of citizenship." 

  66. Life saving techniques

    First aid education

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Teresa Pearce
    Image caption: Teresa Pearce

    Labour MP Teresa Pearce is introducing her Compulsory Emergency First Aid Education Bill.

    The bill would require all state funded secondary schools to teach their pupils first aid. The training would include CPR resuscitation and defibrillator awareness.

    She says that when someone has a cardiac arrest, every minute without CPR or de-fibrillation reduces the victim's survival chances by 10%.

    She adds that CPR can be taught in half an hour. 

  67. Today's business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our coverage of the House of Commons.

    Today is private members' business, where backbench MPs can try and introduce legislation without government support.

    The first bill to be discussed will be Teresa Pearce's Compulsory Emergency First Aid Education (State-funded Secondary Schools) Bill, which would require secondary schools to teach first aid.

    Other bills which could be debated include one to provide audiovisual services for people with impaired sight or hearing, and a bill to regulate mental health advocates.