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Summary

  1. On the committee corridor the Public Administration Committee investigated English votes for English laws.
  2. MPs began their day in the chamber with questions to ministers in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.
  3. There was then a statement on 'Europe: Renegotiation'.
  4. MPs then moved on to the Trade Union Bill, which changes the rules on strike ballots.
  5. In the Lords, questions included one on payments to farmers.
  6. The main debates for peers were on the National Insurance Contributions Bill and on the Finance Bill.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Kate Whannel and Chris Davies

All times stated are UK

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  1. 'One of the best speeches'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing says minister Rory Stewart "has just made one of the best speeches I have ever heard in this House".

    That ends a short week in the House of Commons, which adjourns for a half-term recess until Monday 16 November.

    The House of Lords carries on for one more day this week, meeting tomorrow from 11:00 GMT for questions, followed by consideration of the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill.

  2. 'This strange animal'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rory Stewart

    Environment Minister Rory Stewart has a literary moment in praise of the hedgehog.

    He says "this strange animal" was once known in Scottish Gaelic as "that demonic creature, that horrid creature" but was also described by Shakespeare in A Midsummer Night's Dream:

    Quote Message: Thorny hedgehog, be not seen... Come not near our fairy queen."
  3. 'Traits' of the hedgehog

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Oliver Colville

    Oliver Colville refers to an article which said that hedgehogs are "prickly in character, have a vociferous appetite, a passion for gardens, and have very noisy sex life".

    Quote Message: Madam deputy speaker, I leave it to you to decide which one of these traits I share."

    The Conservative MP says he backs a campaign to identify which animal should be the UK's "national species" - and of course nominates the hedgehog.

    Hedgehog
  4. Hedgehog conservation

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Finally tonight, Conservative MP Oliver Colville is opening an adjournment debate on hedgehog conservation.

  5. MPs back Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Trade Union Bill passes its final stage in the Commons by 305 votes to 271 - a government majority of 34.

    The bill will now go to the House of Lords.

  6. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The debate reaches a conclusion and the Finance Bill passes its remaining stages.

    That also concludes business in the Lords. 

    Peers will return tomorrow at 11:00 GMT to debate, among other subjects, the Bank of England and Financial Services Bill.

  7. The UK needs to reduce welfare payment expenditure

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    On the matter of HMRC tackling tax evasion, Lord O'Neill seeks to assure peers that the government is committing the right resources to HMRC to ask the right questions and pursue those who are not paying the tax they are supposed to.

    Concerning benefits, the minister points out that the UK spends 7% of total global welfare payments and says it would be "pretty worrying" if the government did not believe they cannot do something about that.

    Turning to green policy, he defends the government's commitment to improving the carbon performance of the economy but says it is also trying to be "even more focused on value for money".

    Lord O'Neill
  8. Division at third reading

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons votes on the bill as a whole at third reading, which gives opposition MPs the last chance to vote against it.

  9. Bill 'infringes on human rights'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chris Stephens

    The SNP's Chris Stephens says some of the "rhetoric" in today's debate suggested that "somehow trade union members are different from taxpayers and the public".

    He tells MPs: "Trade union members are taxpayers and members of the general public."

    Mr Stephens says the bill "infringes on human rights and civil liberties".

    Restrictions on facility time for workplace officials and on "check off" attack trade unions' ability to organise, he adds.

  10. 'Draconian, vindictive and counter-productive'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angela Eagle

    Shadow business secretary and "lifelong and proud trade unionist" Angela Eagle rises to speak for the opposition.

    The Labour MP argues that "our country succeeds" when unions, employers and workers co-operate.

    She calls the bill "draconian, vindictive and counter-productive" and accuses the Conservative Party of seeking "unfairly to disadvantage its political rivals".

    The government's plans "leave Tory funding sources completely untouched".

  11. 'Respect will of the people'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nick Boles

    Minister Nick Boles says concessions demonstrate that "the government is willing to hear persuasive arguments and respond".

    He urges the House to respect the "clearly expressed will of the British people" who elected a Conservative government.

  12. Third reading

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The amendment to prevent certain provisions of the bill applying to devolved public sector bodies is defeated by 304 votes to 269, a majority of 35.

    Proceedings are briefly interrupted by a point of order regarding Tata Steel's long products division from Labour's Tom Blenkinsop.

    The final Commons stage of the Trade Union Bill is third reading, which is a brief (in this case) debate on the bill as a whole.

  13. Aspects of economy 'extremely worrying'

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Davies of Oldham notes that the minister Lord O'Neill opened his speech by lauding the "enormous success of the chancellor's management of the economy".

    Lord Davies argues that there are aspects of the economic scene which "are extremely worrying".

    He points out that the government's productivity record is "poor" whilst the balance of payments deficit is "the highest since modern records began".

    He hope the minister will address "the other side of the picture which is all too bleak".

  14. Next vote

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP and Plaid Cymru amendment is rejected by 306 votes to 267.

    The next division is on a Labour amendment which would ensure that the prohibition on the deduction of union subscriptions from wages in the public sector would not apply to devolved public services.

    The amendment has the backing of the SNP and Plaid Cymru.

  15. Division on SNP and Plaid clause

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now divide on a new clause backed by the SNP and Plaid Cymru.

    The new clause would means the bill's provisions relating to public sector employees would require the "consent of the Scottish Parliament, Welsh Assembly, Northern Ireland Assembly, Mayor of London and other public bodies and local authorities in England in their areas of responsibility".

    Commons division
  16. Money bills and the Lords

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Lord Palmer of Childs Hill notes that because the Finance Bill is a money bill, the Lords cannot block it.

    The House of Lords does not, by convention, block financial legislation that has the backing of MPs.

    This principle was established in 1911 during the constitutional gridlock that followed a decision by peers to block the Liberal Party's "people's budget".

  17. Picketing rules stay in bill

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote to reject a Labour and SNP attempt to remove new picketing restrictions from the Trade Union Bill by 304 votes to 271 - a majority of 33.

  18. Division on picketing rules

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final round of report stage votes on the Trade Union Bill begin with a division on a Labour and SNP amendment to remove entirely a clause setting out new picketing rules.

  19. Minister's reply

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Nick Boles accuses Labour of "lacking self-confidence to persuade union members of the basis for supporting their party" - to sounds of anger from the opposite benches.

    He also urges his fellow Conservative, Jeremy Lefroy, not to push his amendment on voluntary "check off".

  20. 'Stealth tax'

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Flight says the Finance Bill contains "too much stealth tax".

    He highlights the tax on dividends and banks as being potentially harmful, and says the cost of home and car insurance will rise.

  21. 'A bit of a shambles'

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Haskel says there is a "mismatch" between the "more prosperous land" promised by the Finance Bill and the measures contained within it.

    He argues that raising the inheritance tax thresholds only benefits the better off and describes the bill as "a bit of a shambles".

    Lord Haskel
  22. Calling 'Mr Nicholas Edward Coleridge Boles'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Speaker calls the business minister to reply to the debate.

    To laughter, John Bercow refers to him by his full name: "Mr Nicholas Edward Coleridge Boles."

  23. 'Check off' amendment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Jeremy Lefroy introduces his amendment to retain the option of "check off" - in which an employer pays a member of staff's trade union subscriptions and deducts it from their salary.

    He tells MPs that, as a Conservative, he does not like "prohibition" and believes in the protection of freedoms.

    He urges the government to "come forward with proposals" to allow such a system to continue, if employees want it.

  24. HMRC cuts 'entirely inappropriate'

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    On tax evasion, Liberal Democrat Baroness Kramer tells the minister that "more work needs to be done". 

    She acknowledges that it is a complex issue but argues that "the bill only goes a small way in trying to grasp this particular nettle".

    She notes that the focus on tax evasion comes at a time when "we've just heard that HMRC is going to be get a 30% reduction in its spending over the rest of this Parliament". 

    She says a further cut "just seems entirely inappropriate" and seeks assurances that HMRC will have the resources necessary to tackle tax evasion.  

    Baroness Kramer
  25. Ban on agency workers

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Lisa Cameron makes a speech about her party's amendment to reinsert a ban on the use of agency workers to cover strikes into the trade union legislation.

    "Removing this ban would be regressive," she says, and claims the public do not support the removal of the ban.

  26. Committee Adjourned

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Home Affairs Select Committee has adjourned. 

  27. 'I know what it's like to cross a picket line'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Victoria Prentis

    Conservative MP Victoria Prentis speaks in support of the bill.

    "As a former public sector worker for 17 years, I know what it's like to cross a picket line," she says, to some boos from the Labour benches.

    She says she support trade unions and accepts that "striking is an important last resort".

    She adds:

    Quote Message: I don't believe that the wearing of a badge or armband or some means of identification is onerous."
  28. Syrian refugees

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Mark Sedwill confirms the UK is on track to take 1,000 Syrian refugees by Christmas.

    You can watch the committee here

  29. 'A hideous juxtaopsition'

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Lennie focuses his remarks on the raising of the inheritance tax threshold and the "tampon tax".

    He argues that the inheritance tax would give the richest 10% a £1bn giveaway whilst tax credit changes mean the poorest loose £1,300 each. 

    He describes this as "a hideous juxtaposition".

    On the tampon tax, he is disappointed that the Prime Minister did not included proposals to end VAT on tampons in his EU reform objectives

    "If he had done so that could have been his legacy." 

    Lord Lennie
  30. Changes to taxing banks

    Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Treasury Minister Lord O'Neill of Gatley argues that "it is only fair" that contributions made by banks "reflects the risk they pose to the economy".

    However he says the UK also needs to remain "competitive as a major financial centre" and therefore "a balanced approach" to bank taxation is needed.

    He believes the government can achieve this by introducing a new supplementary tax on banks whilst reducing the bank levy.

    This change, he tells peers, will raise an extra £2bn over the next six years.

  31. Settlement with the Treasury

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Home Office Permanent Secretary Mark Sedwill says he hopes to have reached a spending settlement with the Treasury before the autumn statement at the end of the month.

    It has been reported that the department is unwilling to make cuts of the scale the Treasury is looking for.

    Read more about the departments which are said to be resisting Treasury cuts here

    You can watch the committee here

  32. 'Minor concessions don't go far enough'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Kevin Brennan says his party is seeking the removal of the bill's clause setting out new picketing rules, claiming that unions are being "set up to make mistakes" and risk legal action.

    He notes that a plan to force unions to produce picketing plans 14 days in advance had been shelved, but adds: "These minor concessions don't go far enough."

    The shadow business minister also says Labour wants to insert a ban on agency workers covering for striking union members into the bill.

    Kevin Brennan
  33. 'Franco style' picketing rules

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business minister Kevan Brennan introduces Labour's amendments to the government's proposals on picketing.

    The bill as drafted would require a "picket supervisor" who must give the police details of the picket and produce a letter of authorisation if required.

    In addition, "the picket supervisor must wear a badge, armband or other item that readily identifies the picket supervisor as such".

    Mr Brennan says the measures have been described by one Conservative MP, David Davis, as "Franco style".

  34. Urgent question

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    David Winnick asks the permanent secretary if there would have been a statement on the funding mistake had an urgent question not been asked in the House of Commons yesterday.

    Mark Sedwill says that there would have been a statement, but not necessarily yesterday.

    You can watch the committee here

  35. Finance Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers turn their attention to the Finance Bill which enshrines the summer Budget into law.

    On tax, the bill locks income tax for the duration of this Parliament and raises the amount above which inheritance tax must be paid.

    The bill also decreases the rates at which the bank levy is paid but will introduce a banking surcharge of 8% on taxable profits.

    Concerning pensions the bill restricts pensions tax relief for “high-income individuals” by reducing the annual allowance for those with incomes over £150,000.

    Gold bars in the Bank of England's vault
    Image caption: Gold bars in the Bank of England's vault
  36. 'An incredible gamble based on nothing but hope'

    National Insurance Contributions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Tunnicliffe says his party will not oppose the bill but argues that the notion that taxes on working people are being reduced is an illusion describing the summer budget as "a tax raising budget".

    He also raises concerns that the bill would restrict the chancellor if "unexpected events arose".

    "This is an incredible gamble by the chancellor based on nothing but hope." 

  37. Limited costs

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The permanent secretary at the Home Office,  Mark Sedwill says mistakes like the one over police funding are rarely the result of one individual.

    Conservative MP Victoria Atkins pushes him on how much this mistake will cost the Home Office.

    Mark Sedwill says the direct costs are "relatively limited"

    You can watch the committee here

  38. 'Frankly silly'

    National Insurance Contributions Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Kramer welcomes both the national insurance employment allowance and the removal of national insurance applicable to young apprentices.

    She also has "no problem" with the government's policy not to raise national insurance in this Parliament but "frankly finds it silly" that the intention needs to be put into legislation.

    "Surely," she asks "the government can control itself without putting up legislative hurdles".

    Baroness Krammer
  39. Electronic voting amendment falls

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    An amendment to allow electronic voting in trade union ballots is defeated by 301 votes to 268 - a government majority of 33.

  40. Reducing the burden of national insurance

    National Insurance Contributions Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Pensions Minister Baroness Altman says the bill is part of wider pack of measures to provide businesses with "the certainty they need to invest with confidence"

    She also argues the provisions of the bill will help deliver "the low and competitive rates of taxation to underpin the growing economy".

    She celebrates the government's "strong record of reducing the burden of national insurance".

  41. Vote on electronic ballots

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide to vote on a clause which would allow electronic voting in trade union ballots, including ballots on industrial action.

    The SNP and Plaid Cymru tabled the new clause.

  42. Online voting rejected

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nick Boles

    Minister Nick Boles rejects new forms of balloting on industrial action.

    To angry jeers from the opposition benches, he claims that online voting is vulnerable to interference from "malware", insisting:

    Quote Message: Internet voting is a bad idea."
  43. "Embarrassment"

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Committee chair Keith Vaz says the funding mistake is a big embarrassment to Permanent Secretary Mark Sedwill.

    Mr Sedwill says "I am embarrassed by this."

    Police Minister Mike Penning made a statement in the Commons yesterday announcing that changes to the way government money is allocated to police forces have had to be delayed.

    Read more about the delay here

    You can watch the committee here

    Mark Sedwill
    Image caption: Mark Sedwill
  44. National Insurance Contributions Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Pound coins

    Peers now turn to the National Insurance Contributions Bill which is being given its second reading.

    The National Insurance Contributions Bill ensures that there are no rises in national insurance contributions during the current Parliament.

    Passing the bill would ensure the Conservatives fulfill their manifesto promise not to raise national insurance 2015 – 20.

  45. Minister backs ballot thresholds

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business Minister Nick Boles speaks in opposition to the amendment to require the consent of the devolved administrations and local authorities to the bill's requirement of a 50% turnout threshold in strike ballots.

    "Employers do not see boundaries when engaging staff," he tells the House, arguing that such arrangements could lead to "a great deal of confusion" and cost.

    His insists that the bill "will not stop strikes".

  46. 'How serious is the prime minister?'

    Statement: Europe renogotiation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP's Lord Pearson of Rannoch wonders how seriously the prime minister takes his belief that "If powers don't need to reside in Brussels they should return to Westminster."

    He asks if the EU nations don't agree to "this revolutionary concept" does that mean the prime minister will campaign to leave the EU.

  47. Change of witness

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The committee is now hearing evidence from the Home Office Permanent Secretary Mark Sedwill

    You can watch here 

  48. Stop and search

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sir Thomas Winsor says the police "need to take much more seriously" how they carry our stop and search.

    Conservative MP Nusrat Ghani asks if there is a link between inappropriate stop and searches and a lack of diversity in the police.

    "Yes there is" says Sir Thomas Winsor

    You can watch the committee here

  49. Statement "inadequate, vague and meaningless'

    Satement: Europe renogotiation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Lawson
    Image caption: Lord Lawson

    Conservative peer and president of "Europe for Britain" Lord Lawson of Blaby says the statement ran "the full gamet from inadequate to vague to meaningless".

    Concerning the Prime Minister's aim to end the commitment to "ever closer union" Lord Lawson wonders if it will be possible given that all other EU countries will continue to seek "ever close union".

    The Earl of Courtown insists that the government wants to halt "the constant flow of powers to Brussels".

  50. What about commuters

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative James Cartlidge says if Mr Lavery wants to see fury and civil unrest he should see tube commuters trying to get on a bus because of a strike called on a low turnout.

    James Cartlidge MP
  51. A June referendum will be 'impossible'

    Statement: Europe renogotiation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Morgan of Ely expresses disappointment that the prime minister chose to make his announcement on EU reforms at an external organisation rather than the House of Commons.

    She raises concerns about the timetable set out for achieving the  objectives and asks if there will be a need for a special summit to agree EU changes or if the government expects discussions to be "tagged on a pre-scheduled meeting".

    If the latter she suggests the earliest date for agreement would be the European Council in March making a June date for the referendum impossible.

    Baroness Morgan of Ely
  52. Controversial appointment

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Labour's David Winnick asks Sir Thomas Winsor if the controversy over his appointment is over. Sir Thomas says "it will never be over."

    Sir Thomas was the first person who has not served as a police officer to take up the role.

    According to Sir Thomas, the Home Secretary received 20,000 letters of objection to the appointment.

    Read more about the appointment of Sir Thomas here

    You can watch the committee here

  53. Civil disobedience

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Ian Lavery ends his speech saying he predicts there will be civil disobedience because "bad laws need to be changed".

  54. 'Substantial discussions in December'

    Statement: Europe renegotiation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Earl of Courtown says the government will now begin formal re-negotiations with European institutions and Parliaments.

    He tells peers that there will be "substantial discussion" at the December European Council meeting.

  55. Trade Union Bill debated in Scottish Parliament

    The Trade Union Bill is also being debated in the Scottish Parliament this afternoon.

    You can follow what MSPs are saying here

  56. 'Attack on the trade union movement'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "This is a bill that nobody asked for and nobody wants," Labour's Ian Lavery says.

    He calls the Trade Union Bill "a ferocious, full-frontal attack on the trade union movement".

    Quote Message: It's about disarming any dissent, especially in the public sector."
  57. Demand for policing

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sir Thomas Winsor says there is no national method for measuring demand for police services.

    He says that if there was it would help assess what resources individual forces require and help improve efficiency and effectiveness.

    You can watch the committee here

    Sir Thomas Winsor
    Image caption: Sir Thomas Winsor
  58. Europe renogotiation statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The motion to establish an International Relations Committee is agreed to and so peers move on to a government statement made earlier in the Commons entitled “Europe: renegotiation”.

    David Cameron wants to renegotiate the terms of the UK’s membership ahead of the referendum by the end of 2017.

    If he achieves the reforms he wants David Cameron has said he will campaign for Britain to remain in the EU.

    The Prime Minister’s four objectives are protecting access to the single market for non-euro countries, improving competitiveness, bolstering the role of Parliament and tackling immigration.

    Europe House in London
    Image caption: Europe House in London
  59. 'Low paid' affected by strikes

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Lucy Frazer criticises the current system of unions being able to call strikes with a low turnout of members balloted.

    "The bus drivers' strike earlier this year took place at the behest of 21%," she claims.

    She adds that "low paid workers" are affected by such strikes.

    Lucy Frazer
  60. Change of witness

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sir Bernard Hogan Howe has completed his evidence session

    The committee is now hearing from Sir Thomas Winsor, Chief Inspector of Constabulary and Mike Cunningham Inspector of Constabulary.

  61. 'A wider view is needed'

    Liaison Committee report debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Howell of Guildford welcomes the decision and seeks to "disabuse Lord Campbell-Savours" of the notion that the Common's Foreign Affairs Committee will be undermined by a Lords' International Relations Committee.

    He points out that the Commons Committee's job is to scrutinise the actions of the Foreign Office. 

    "A wider view is needed and that is just the sort of thing the Chamber can provide." 

  62. Policing football

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Victoria Atkins asks if the commissioner would support charging football clubs for policing outside their grounds.

    Sir Bernard says "yes, especially the premier league clubs."

    You can watch the committee here

    Victoria Atkins
    Image caption: Victoria Atkins
  63. Liaison Committee report debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to the motion to approve the 2nd Report from the Liaison Committee which recommends the establishment of an International Relations Committee.

    UKIP's Lord Pearson of Rannoch wonders why the committee is needed given the existence of the External Affairs Sub Committee and the European Union Committee, particularly when "Brussels pays so little attention to their deliberations".

    Labour's Lord Campbell-Savours is concerned that a Lord's International Relations Committee risks undermining the credibility of the Common's Foreign Affairs Committee.

    Conservative peer Baroness O'Cathain supports the establishment of the committee arguing that given the instability in the world Parliament needed to take advantage of the expertise of peers. 

    Lord Campbell-Savours
    Image caption: Lord Campbell-Savours
  64. 'Crossing the road to pick a fight'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Kevin Brennan says that, with the Trade Union Bill, the government is "crossing the road to pick a fight" where none exists.

    Kevin Brennan
  65. Gangs

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sir Bernard Hogan Howe says that on some estates it's "difficult for children to avoid joining gangs".

    However, the commissioner disputes the idea that Labour MP David Winnick puts forward that some areas are "dominated" by gangs.

    You can watch the committee here

    David Winnick
    Image caption: David Winnick
  66. 'Respect agenda'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business minister Kevin Brennan says Prime Minister David Cameron promised a "respect agenda" towards the devolved administrations in the Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    He says that Labour Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones has written to the PM to say the Trade Union Bill shows a "complete lack of respect for the National Assembly for Wales".

    Mr Brennan adds that Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has requested "a legislative consent motion" in the Scottish Parliament before the bill applies in Scotland.

    The Labour spokesman says his party is opposed to the bill "across the UK" and does not back the SNP and Plaid amendment to require the consent of the devolved administrations, as well as English local authorities and the London mayor, to the bill's provisions.

    He argues that to apply the bill's measures to the different nations of the UK separately would "play into Tory hands" and could mean "a race to the bottom".

  67. A list of airports 'at risk'

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord West recalls work he started in 2009 on creating a list of foreign airports "at risk" from terrorism and what the UK could do to improve matters:

    "I was concerned that we were getting safer here but there's no point if we kill people on their way into the country".

    He asks the government if they have the full list now and if it is working to sort out the problems in those airports.

    Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon tells peers that aviation security is kept under close review and that the government will act where needed but insists that it does not comment in detail on security arrangements.

    Lord West of Spithead
  68. Terrorism

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Sir Bernard Hogan Howe says there has been a "significant rise" in anti-terrorism leads from local policing.

    He says this is a change from the past, when most leads came from the intelligence services.

    You can watch the committee here

  69. Neighbourhood policing

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Labour's Chuka Umunna asks if Sir Bernard Hogan Howe thinks neighbourhood policing is important.

    The commissioner replies "vital."

    You can watch the committee here

  70. Fourth questions: airport security

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord West of Spithead asks the government if they are satisfied with the level of airport security at major business and tourist destinations.

    Last week the government suspended all UK flights from Sharm el-Sheikh in Egypt, to the UK following the Russian aeroplane crash in Sinai which killed 224 people.

    The UK government has suggested that the crash was caused by a bomb planted on the plane.

  71. Jobs for returning Chagossians

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Anderson of Swansea suggests that Chagossians who choose to return will find it difficult "after their exile" to return to life on the island. 

    He asks if the US will offer returning islanders jobs on its naval base.

    The Earl of Courtown agrees that employment could be an issue but insists that until the government considers a final consultation, "nothing could be agreed to".

  72. Body worn cameras

    Home Affairs Committee: police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    "By March next year twenty two thousand officers on the front line will have body-worn video" says Sir Bernard Hogan Howe.

    The introduction of body cameras followed criticism of the Met over the death of Mark Duggan, who was shot by armed officers in August 2011.

    Read more here

    and watch the committee here 

  73. Chagossian removal 'clearly wrong'

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman the Earl of Courtown tells peers that the government has just closed a consultation on resettling Chagossians and will make a decision soon.

    He acknowledges that the way the islanders were removed was "clearly wrong".

  74. Strike changes: What do they mean?

    John Moylan & Howard Mustoe, BBC News

    Demonstration

    The Conservative government is planning to make "significant changes" to the way unions can call a strike. What do we know about the planned changes so far and how do they compare to other countries?

    Read more.

  75. Third question: Chagos Islands

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Lord Luce asks when the government expects to complete their policy review of resettlement in the Chagos Islands.

    In 1960s and 70s the British government removed 2,000 Chaogssians to make way for a United States Air Force base.

    The islanders have gone to the Supreme Court to challenge a decision made by the House of Lords in 2008 which dashed their hopes of returning.      

    Diego Garcia, Chagos Islands
    Image caption: Diego Garcia, Chagos Islands
  76. Crowd-funded police officers

    Home Affairs Committee, police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Keith Vaz asks Stephen Greenhalgh, deputy mayor for policing and crime in London, what he thinks about wealthy London residents "crowd-funding" their own police officers.

    The deputy mayor says he is "not against" the idea.

    Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe says he has instinctive concerns about the idea.

    You can watch the hearing here.

    Stephen Greenhalgh
    Image caption: Stephen Greenhalgh
  77. 'Farmers have their backs to the wall'

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Gardiner of Kimble tells peers that the rural payment agency is on track to make the majority of payments by the end of December and complete all payments by January.

    UKIPs' Lord Willoughby expresses gratitude for "that limited answer" and notes that "our masters in Brussels have graciously permitted countries to make advanced payments on top of the basic payment".

    He asks why DEFRA has not taken up that option at a time when "farmers have their backs to the wall".

    The minister replies that the government is committed to making "payments in full as soon as possible".

  78. Strike ballots 'vital'

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jonathan Djanogly

    Conservative MP Jonathan Djanogly, who seems to be sporting a Movember moustache, says the introduction of the requirement to hold a ballot before strike action "was a very significant step".

    He adds: "I think we can all agree that voting before a strike is vital."

    Holding a secret ballot avoids "threats or coercion or intimidation of the voter", he argues.

  79. Second question: Basic Farm Payments

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP peer Lord Willougby de Broke asks the minister what percentage of the Basic Farm Payment he expects to be paid to qualifying farmers by the end of the year.

    Farmers with at least 5 hectares of agricultural land are eligible to apply for rural grants from the European Union.

    The scheme was developed following reform of the Common Agricultural Policy in 2014/15.

    Farmland in County Durham
    Image caption: Farmland in County Durham
  80. 'A thug of a plant'

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble tells peers that the government has given local authorities the power to compel landowners to deal with "this real thug of a plant".

    He welcomes the work of local action groups which have helped to reduce or eradicate knotweed in parts of England.

    Conservative, Baroness Sharples notes that she first asked the question 26 years ago and is glad progress is being made. 

    Baroness Sharples
  81. Changes delayed

    Home Affairs Committee, police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Changes to the way government money is allocated to police forces in England and Wales is to be delayed

    The amount of money police forces receive from the government is based on a funding formula, which assesses population size, social and economic factors, crime rates and other data.  

    The proposed changes for 2016/17 will now be delayed due to what the government says is a "statistical error"

    Read more here 

    You can watch the police funding committee hearing here

    Policemen
  82. Amendment to 50% turnout rule

    Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first amendment for consideration at report stage today concerns the bill's proposals for a 50% turnout requirement for a ballot on industrial action to be valid.

    The SNP and Plaid Cymru have tabled an amendment to require the "consent of the Scottish government, Welsh government, Northern Ireland Executive, the Mayor of London and local authorities in England in their areas or responsibility".

    SNP MP Chris Stephens says the UK government has said the bill "boosts democracy" but, he claims, it "stifles" workers' ability to express themselves.

    He calls the bill "an ideological attack on the largest section of society that stands up to exploitation".

    Chris Stephens in the Commons
  83. First Question: Japanese knotweed

    Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Baroness Sharples has the first question on preventing the spread of Japanese knotweed.

    Japanese knotweed is a fast-growing, difficult to kill plant that and can cause damage to house foundations.

    The plant was brought to the UK by 19th century botanists.

    Japanese Knotweed
  84. No plans to retire

    Home Affairs Committee, police funding

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Committee Chair Keith Vaz asks Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan Howe if he indents to retire soon, as had been reported.

    Sir Bernard says he has no plans to retire.

    Sir Bernard Hogan Howe
    Image caption: Sir Bernard Hogan Howe
  85. Police funding

    Home Affairs Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    This afternoon we'll be hearing about changes to the police funding formula from the Home Affairs Select Committee.

    Witnesses include Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. 

    You can watch the committee online here.

  86. Introductions

    Former MPs introduced to the House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former MPs Greg Barker (Conservative) and Lorely Burt (Liberal Democrat) are being introduced to the House of Lords.

    During the coalition government Lorely Burt was a government whip and Greg Barker was an energy and climate change minister.

    Baron Barker of Battle
    Image caption: Former MP for Bexhill and Battle, Baron Barker of Battle
    Baroness Burt of Solihull
    Image caption: Former MP for Solihull, Baroness Burt of Solihull
  87. Good Afternoon

    Today in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Houses of Parliament
    Image caption: Houses of Parliament

    Today’s business will start at 14:30 GMT with questions on Japanese knotweed, the basic farm payment, the Chagos Islands and airport security.

    Foreign Office Minister, the Earl of Courtown, will then repeat a Commons statement on the government’s renegotiation of the UK’s membership of the European Union.

    The rest of the afternoon will be taken up with two pieces of legislation, the National Insurance Contributions Bill and all stages of the Finance Bill.

    But first, two new peers will be introduced to the House of Lords.

  88. Trade Union Bill

    The proposals have proved very unpopular with some union leaders and have been described as a "major attack on civil liberties"

     You can read more here 

  89. Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move on to debate the Trade Union Bill.

    Under the bill, there would need be a turnout of at least 50% before action could take place. In addition, 40% of those entitled to vote would have to be in favour in key public services such as health, education, fire, transport, border security and energy.

    Union members would also have to "opt in" to political levies and restrictions on the use of agency staff would be reduced.

  90. Trade Union Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ministers have denied the plans are an attack on workers' rights.

    You can read more here

  91. Decentralisation

    Ten Minute Rule Bill

    Mr Austin wins the right to take his bill forward, but without government backing it will not become law.

  92. Decentralisation

    Ten Minute Rule Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The statement ends and Labour MP Ian Austin stands to introduce his Ten Minute Rule Bill.

    It aims to decentralise the civil service away from London.

    He says there are now 5000 more civil servants than there were in 2013, despite spending cuts.

    He suggests that all posts that do not require face to face contact with ministers move out of London.

    Ian Austin
    Image caption: Ian Austin
  93. Alienation

    Statement: EU renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister David Lidington says "Europe as a whole" would benefit from the British renegotiation proposals.

    He adds that "in many European countries we are seeing a sense of dissatisfaction and alienation from the way decisions are taken in Brussels".

    David Lidington
    Image caption: Minister David Lidington
  94. "With all my heart"

    Statement: EU renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNPs Peter Grant notes that in his speech earlier today the prime minister said he would "campaign with all my heart and soul to keep Britain inside a reformed European Union".

    He asks why this commitment was not repeated in the House of Commons, and suggests Minister David Lidington does not share this commitment.

    David Lidington replied that he remained "confident" of a successful outcome, and that he would be joining the prime minister in campaigning to remain in a reformed European Union.  

  95. Welcome statement

    Statement: EU renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Jonathan Reynolds welcomes the statement, and adds that there are some Conservatives who would leave the European Union "regardless of the cost to this country."

  96. "Is that it?"

    Statement: Europe renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Is that it?" Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin demands to know.

    He also asks why Britain should "put up with being a second tier country in an increasingly centralised European Union, paying more and more and losing more and more control?"

    Minister David Lidington says Bernard Jenkin "underestimates" how far reaching the proposals are.

    Bernard Jenkin
    Image caption: Bernard Jenkin
  97. "Satisfactory" outcome

    Statement: Europe renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Tom Brake asks if all the elements in the prime minister's letter need to be met for the PM to campaign for an "in" vote in a referendum.

    Minister David Lidington replies that they need a "satisfactory" outcome from renegotiation.

    Tom Brake
    Image caption: Tom Brake
  98. UKIP: How will UK be more competitive?

    Statement. Europe renegotiation

    Douglas Carswell

    UKIP MP Douglas Carswell asks how the government intends to "magically make the UK more competitive" while remaining in the EU.

    Minister David Lidington says that the UK is pushing for improved competition rules and strengthening the single market. He says 

    Quote Message: These are opportunities that British business has urged us to take."
  99. Paisley: Why trust EU?

    Statement. Europe renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ian Paisley

    DUP MP Ian Paisley claims that EU institutions "constantly break their own solemn word and treaties".

    He asks why the UK should "put any faith or trust" in agreements with the the EU.

  100. 'Couldn't be closer to the exit'

    Statement: Europe renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Gethins

    "What a difference a year makes," says SNP Europe spokesman Stephen Gethins.

    He says that opponents of independence warned Scots before last year's referendum that "we'd be getting chucked out of the European Union" if Scotland became independent.

    Quote Message: Now, frankly, we couldn't be closer to the exit."
  101. Clarke claims EU states may 'discriminate'

    Statement. Europe renegotiation

    Conservative MP and former minster Kenneth Clarke asks if UK citizens in other EU states want to see the governments of those states "discriminate" against them, if EU citizens in the UK are denied benefits.

    Minister David Lidington says the government always bears the interests of UK citizens in mind.

  102. 'Jobs, investment, rights, security'

    Statement. Europe renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Pat McFadden says the government must set out what renegotiation of EU membership means "for our jobs, for our investment, for our employment rights and for our national security".

    Pat McFadden
  103. Labour warns against 'second-class' EU membership

    Statement, Europe; renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Europe minister Pat McFadden says it is right that the UK should "press for guarantees for non-eurozone members" within the EU.

     But he warns against being a "second-class or associate member" of the EU which, he claims, would "weaken Britain".

    The Labour frontbencher also calls for the protection of "hard-won employment rights".

  104. 'Dragged against our will to political union'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Lidington

    "Too many people think the EU is something that is done to them," David Lidington argues.

    The Europe minister claims many people feel they are being "dragged against our will towards political union".

    Conservative MPs murmur their agreement when the minister says there is a need to "crack down on abuse" of free movement within the EU, including ending "the practice of sending child benefit overseas".

  105. Statement on EU renegotiation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister David Lidington's statement comes as David Cameron  outlines his four goals for reforming the UK's membershipof the EU in a letter to European Council President Donald Tusk.

    The letter includes demands for:

    • protection of the single market for Britain and other non-euro countries
    • boosting competitiveness by setting a target for the reduction of the "burden" of red tape
    • exempting Britain from "ever-closer union" and bolster the blocking power of national parliaments
    • restricting EU migrants' access to in-work benefits such as tax credits
  106. Europe statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Questions are over and Foreign Office Minister David Lidington is making a statement on the UK's relationship with the European Union.

    "This government was elected with a mandate to renegotiate the UK's membership of the European Union," he says.

    He adds that "technical" discussions have taken place over the legal options for renegotiation.

  107. Committee adjourned

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee has now finished its evidence session for today.. 

  108. "Political price to pay"

    English Votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Chris Grayling says he hopes English votes for English laws is a "permanent fixture", and that no party would repeal it.

    He also says there would be a "political price to pay" for a government that reversed the laws.

    Earlier in the Committee, Chris Bryant said a future Labour government would probably repeal the legislation.

  109. Question on lorry drivers

    Business, innovation and skills questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Chris Heaton-Harris asks what steps the government is taking to address shortages of drivers in the haulage industry. 

    In response, business minister Nick Boles says he agrees there is a "desperate need" for more drivers, and that greater employment in the sector would be a "great opportunity" for those currently in low-skilled jobs.

    He adds that the government is currently working towards creating a "new apprenticeship standard" for HGV drivers. 

    Conservative MP Chris Heaton-Harris
  110. 'No cap' on international students

    Business, innovation and skills questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There follows a series of questions on the number of foreign students coming to UK universities. 

    Labour MP and former shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt asks when the government will take student numbers out of overall migration targets. 

    He says the current approach risks "undermining" the "global reach" of British universities. 

    In reply, universities minister, Jo Johnson, says there is  "no cap on international students" and the government is committed to keeping the country's universities sector competitive. 

    Universities minister Jo Johnson
    Image caption: Universities minister Jo Johnson
  111. Scottish referendum

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative Oliver Dowden asks why the latest English votes for English laws proposals go further than previous suggestions.

    Chris Grayling says it is a result of the Scottish referendum, leading to greater powers being devolved to Scotland.

    He says England needed to be respected by more than "convention".

  112. Question on steel job losses

    Business, innovation and skills questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business secretary Angela Eagle asks a question about yesterday's meeting of EU ministers on the crisis in the steel industry. 

    She says that "no action" was agreed at the meeting that will make a "material difference" to UK steel plants facing job losses. 

    She urges greater action to tackle the "root causes" of the problem, and accuses the business secretary of "hiding behind the EU" on the issue. 

    In reply, Mr Javid says that steel production fell 45% under the last Labour government, with the number of jobs in the sector "halved". 

    Angela Eagle
  113. Taxing questions

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Bernard Jenkin says the Scottish Parliament could reduce tax for Scots while Scottish MPs could vote to maintain current taxation levels on England and Wales.

    Chris Grayling says the English can say no to "solutions they do not want".

  114. Javid: government committed to Doncaster college

    Business, innovation and skills questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Caroline Flint asks the business secretary whether he can guarantee that her constituency town of Doncaster will still be the site for one of the two planned national colleges for high speed rail. 

    Doncaster and Birmingham were chosen to host the two colleges last year, but Ms Flint accuses the government of displaying a "lukewarm" attitude to the idea now. 

    Mr Javid replies that the government is committed to the Doncaster college, which he says will make "big differences to skills in what is a very important area for infrastructure". 

    Labour MP Caroline Flint
  115. Sunday trading

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Conservative committee chair, Bernard Jenkin asks about changes to the Sunday trading laws after receiving a text "from a political correspondent"

    Government plans to relax Sunday trading laws in England and Wales are facing defeat in the House of Commons. 

    The SNP has told the BBC and the Guardian the party has decided to vote against the changes amid fears it could drive down Scottish workers' wages.

    Read more here

  116. Government will 'go further' on apprenticeships

    Business, innovation and skills questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first question this morning is from Conservative MP Nicola Blackwood, who asks the business secretary what he has made of recent trends in the number of people starting apprenticeships.

    Business secretary Sajid Javid replies that there have been 2.4m apprenticeships started since May 2010, but that the government is committed to "going even further". 

    He adds that ministers have pledged to create three million new apprenticeships over the course of the Parliament. 

    Business secretary Sajid Javid
  117. Electronic voting

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Labour's Paul Flynn asks why MPs cannot vote electronically rather than walking through the division lobbies.

    Chris Grayling says walking through the lobby is a good opportunity for MPs to have a quick word with ministers.

    View more on twitter
  118. Change of witness

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    There is now a change of witness, and next up is Leader of the House Chris Grayling, the minister responsible for constitutional affairs.

    Chris Grayling
    Image caption: Chris Grayling
  119. Not our strong point

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    "I'm not sure that policy is really our strong point at the moment" says Chris Bryant, after committee chair Bernard Jenkin asks him if it is the official policy of the opposition to reduce the number of government ministers.

    Bernard Jenkin
    Image caption: Committee Chair Bernard Jenkin
  120. Army malaria drug safety inquiry to start

    Defence Committee

    An inquiry into the use of a controversial anti-malarial drug given to British military personnel is to begin taking evidence.

    Mefloquine, or Lariam, is given to soldiers serving overseas but can cause anxiety, depression and nightmares.

    The Defence Select Committee is investigating after concerns from some military personnel over its safety.

    The government says it only prescribes Lariam after an individual risk assessment.

    Read more here 

    Watch the Committee here

    Soldier
  121. Today in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business in the Commons begins at 11.30 GMT with questions to the Business Secretary, Sajid Javid, and his team of ministers.

    After that, Europe Minister David Lidington will make a statement on renegotiating the UK's membership of the European Union.

    A ten-minute rule bill follows, with Labour MP Ian Austin introducing his bill to move more central government functions out of London to elsewhere in the UK.

    The main item of legislation today is the consideration of any final Commons amendments to the Trade Union Bill, which makes changes to trade union law including requiring a minimum turnout for strike ballots. 

  122. Regional devolution

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    "There is a significant need for the real devolution of power within England" says Chris Bryant, adding he regrets Labour's failure to introduce regional assemblies. 

  123. Elected House of Lords

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    "There are things I disagreed with" about Labour's time in government says Chris Bryant.

    He says he wished they'd introduced an elected second chamber.

  124. Written constitution

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Chris Bryant says there should be a constitutional convention to resolve issues surrounding devolution, leading to a lasting settlement.

    He says his aim would be a written constitution. 

  125. Second class MPs

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Chris Bryant says that English votes for English laws creates two classes of MP.

    He says that as "a passionate supporter of the union", he doesn't want to "add a new grievance."

    Chris Bryant
    Image caption: Chris Bryant, Shadow Leader of the House
  126. Funding issues

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Committee chair Bernard Jenkin asks if devolution for England could affect the Barnet Formula which funds the devolved nations.

    The Barnett formula is a system of grants which dictates the level of public spending in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    Under it, extra funding, or cuts,  from Westminster are allocated according to the population size of each nation and which powers are devolved to them.

    Read more here.

  127. New process agreed

    English votes for English laws

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The select committee is discusing the effect of adding a new legislative stage to the process of passing a bill through the Commons.

    The new process was agreed in a vote in the House of Commons on 22 October 2015.

    Read more here.

    English and Scottish flags