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Summary

  1. PMQs: Corbyn v May over schools
  2. He says grammars are "vanity project"
  3. PM says Corbyn sent son to a grammar school
  4. MPs discuss aviation security measures
  5. Lib Dem Tim Farron wants new EU referendum

Live Reporting

By Brian Wheeler and Alex Hunt

All times stated are UK

  1. The key bits from Prime Minister's Questions

    Thanks for joining us for coverage of this week's big event in the Commons - you can follow proceedings in the Commons, Lords, Scottish Parliament, Northern Ireland Assembly and Welsh Assembly on BBC Parliament live pages.

    And we leave you with a selection of key PMQs clips

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  2. Tory MP: Why are laptops 'safer in the hold?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tory MP Sir Desmond Swayne

    During Mr Grayling's statement earlier, a number of Conservative MPs pressed for more details about the laptop cabin ban and expressed concerns about the political signal that it sent out.

    Former Foreign Office minister Huge Swire, who has just returned from a trip to Egypt, said he had seen first hand the "devastating" impact that the ban on flights to Sharm-al-Sheikh and said many in the country felt that they were being "singled out".

    He said British ministers and officials needed to go on a "diplomatic offensive" to explain why the measures were necessary.

    Sir Desmond Swayne, a former international development minister, had a very succinct question, asking Mr Grayling why ministers believed laptops, tablets and larger mobile phones were "safer in the hold".

    The transport secretary said he could not discuss the detail of the evolving security threat but the UK had taken the right decision in terms of protecting British citizens.

    In response, Sir Desmond was seen to nod his head rather ruefully and sport what can only be described as a quizzical look. 

  3. Business this afternoon

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move on to consider the remaining stages of the Pension Schemes Bill, which amends earlier legislation to cap early exit charges and administration charges.

    It also seeks to protect pension savings in ‘Master Trust’ schemes, which involve contributions from employees of multiple companies.

    The bill has cleared all stages in the House of Lords.

    Once third reading is completed, MPs move on to a general debate on the subject of Brexit and global trade.

  4. Second EU referendum bill to get second reading

    Ten minute rule motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Farron

    "If the prime minister is so confident that the deal she is planning for is what people voted for, then why not have a vote?" says Tim Farron, closing his speech introducing his bill for a second EU referendum.

    His bill goes to second reading unopposed, but it is very unlikely to become law.

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  5. Watch: Clock ticks closer to indyref2 vote call

    Video content

    Video caption: Clock ticks closer to indyref2 vote call
  6. Lib Dem leader 'passionately' believes UK should stay in single market

    Ten minute rule motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "No-one knows what the final deal will look like," says Mr Farron, but that the prime minister has already ruled out continued membership of the EU single market.

    "I passionately believe that ending our membership of the world's biggest market will damage the UK," he says, and he demands that the UK remain in it.

    The prime minister is "pulling us out before the negotiations have even begun."

  7. 'Ludicrous inconsistency' of government over Brexit

    Ten minute rule motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "I accept that we have had our mandate referendum," says Tim Farron, but goes on to argue that the British people should have a say on the "final destination".

    "The government displayed ludicrous inconsistency" on refusing to allow a meaningful vote in the Commons on the eventual deal with the European Union, he says.

  8. 'Democracy did not end on 23 June last year' - Lib Dem leader

    Ten minute rule motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tim Farron

    Lib Dem Leader Tim Farron is now introducing his Terms of Withdrawal from the European Union (Referendum) Bill under the ten minute rule motion.

    Mr Farron's private member's bill seeks to require a referendum on the eventual terms of the UK's deal for leaving the EU.

    "Democracy did not end at 10pm on 23 June last year," he says in his opening comments.

  9. Lib Dem support for leader

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A number of Lib Dem MPs have turned out to support their leader Tim Farron who will be introducing his ten minute rule motion on a referendum following the final Brexit deal in a few moments.

    Lib Dems
  10. 'Don't cancel holiday plans' - transport secretary

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "We are not saying to people 'do not fly to these countries'," says Chris Grayling in response to a question on reassurance for passengers from Conservative Kevin Foster.

    "We are not asking them to cancel holidays," he says, this is about ensuring passengers are safe when they do travel.

    The countries listed in the electronic devices ban are Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia, Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

  11. Concerns over security at overseas airports

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Louise Ellman, who is chair of the Transport Committee, asks for clarification for passengers, and how the situation at overseas airports is being assessed "where it's known there are security concerns".

    The transport secretary says the government wants to ensure that business and tourist travel continues and that he is working internationally to address security concerns at other airports.

    "We will do everything we can to work with our partners to ensure we have as a safe an aviation business as we possibly can," Chris Grayling tells MPs.

  12. 'Nothing to do with singling out countries' - transport secretary

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Richard Burden

    Opposition spokesperson Richard Burden presses the transport secretary for more information on why certain countries are listed in the electronic devices ban.

    The transport secretary reiterates that he cannot give more precise details about security threats, but that the policy has "nothing to do with singling out countries" and is entirely based on evolving security requirements.

    Chris Grayling goes on to say that the UK does not have to "match" US security measures.

  13. No further details on electronics ban

    Urgent question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Secretary Chris Grayling says he cannot give details on the kinds of threats the government has been made aware of, or precisely why flights from certain countries have been included in the electronic devices ban.

    He goes on to say that the UK must make its own security arrangements, and that measures taken by the United States "is a matter for them".

    Mr Grayling says he will be writing to UK insurers to make them aware that insurance will be required to cover electronic devices carried in hold luggage where the risk of theft is greater.

  14. What comes under the cabin baggage ban?

    Urgent question

    devices

    The cabin baggage ban on laptops and tablets, announced by the UK government on Tuesday, applies to certain direct flights to the UK from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.

    The ban applies to any device larger than 16cm long, 9.3cm wide or 1.5cm deep. It includes smart phones, but most fall outside these limits.