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Summary

  1. Voting in the Labour leadership contest ends
  2. Result announced at a special conference on Saturday
  3. Labour's ruling body fails to agree party rule changes
  4. Theresa May attacks legal claims against UK troops in Iraq

Live Reporting

By Aiden James

All times stated are UK

Wednesday afternoon recap

Here's a recap of the main events on the final day of voting in the Labour leadership contest:

In full: Jeremy Corbyn interview

And here's BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg's full interview with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Watch: Jeremy Corbyn happy to 'wipe the slate clean'

Jeremy Corbyn says he is happy to "wipe the slate clean" if he retains his position as Labour leader.

Mr Corbyn told the BBC he had never responded to the "unpleasant remarks" directed at him by a "very large number of Labour MPs" during the campaign.

And he said "an awful lot" of MPs had contacted him keen to "play their part" in the party after the leadership contest is over.

Voting has now closed and the result is due to be announced on Saturday.

Mr Corbyn is the overwhelming favourite to win and, despite apparent strong support among the party's supporters, most of his MPs do not back his leadership, and he has faced mass resignations from his shadow cabinet.

Scottish independence: MacAskill warns against 'headlong rush' to indyref2

Kenny MacAskill
PA

Kenny MacAskill has become the latest senior SNP figure to caution against a "headlong rush" into a second Scottish independence referendum.

The former justice secretary in the Scottish government said the Brexit vote left too many questions that the SNP still had to answer.

It follows MSP Joan McAlpine saying on Tuesday that Nicola Sturgeon had put a referendum on the back burner.

But former first minister Alex Salmond has predicted a second independence vote will be held in 2018.

Read more.

UKIP councillor rejoins Conservatives

BBC East political correspondent tweets...

Sarkozy urges UK action on Calais camp

Nicolas Sarkozy
AFP

Former French president Nicolas Sarkozy has insisted that Britain must take responsibility for the thousands of migrants in the "Jungle" camp at Calais.

Meeting local residents, he vowed to "fix the problem" of the camp by the end of 2017 if his campaign to win back the presidency next year is successful.

Mr Sarkozy is among seven candidates for the Republican nomination.

But his campaign's focus on immigration has been dogged by controversy.

Read more.

MPs warn Islamic State could pose global threat

Islamic State already controls parts of Libya and MPs warn it could spread further
Reuters
Islamic State already controls parts of Libya and MPs warn it could spread further

MPs have warned of the risk of so-called Islamic State proliferating into an "international movement" if it is forced out of Iraq and Syria.

The Commons Defence Committee said there was a danger of IS, also known as Daesh, forming regional offshoots, like al-Qaeda before it, in Africa and Asia.

IS-backed fighters are active in Libya and have mounted attacks in Turkey.

Speaking in Iraq, Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said the UK would not "walk away" once Daesh was defeated.

Read more.

Labour leadership election 'biggest of its kind', says party

After the Labour leadership election ballot closed earlier, a party spokesman said: "This leadership election has been the biggest of its kind, with over 650,000 eligible voters, while engaging millions more in the conversation about Labour’s future through TV debates and social media.

"To ensure the validity of the process, Labour put in place a robust validation process to ensure votes cast were eligible according to the party’s rules and procedures. 

"Less than 0.5% of the total electorate in this contest have been deemed ineligible to vote, and the Labour Party received less than half the number of ballot re-issue requests than last year, despite an increase in the electorate.

"The Labour Party is a democratic organisation and we hope to be able to build on the level of interest received in our leadership election and develop our movement, while we unite behind whoever is elected as our leader on Saturday and come together to take on the Tories as we head towards important local elections and the next general election."

Could Brexit lead to comeback for pounds, ounces and yards?

Greengrocer displaying vegetables for sale in both pounds and kilograms
BBC
Traders sell fruit and veg in pounds and ounces although they cannot weigh it that way

Not giving an inch, going the extra mile, entering the final furlong, piling on the pounds and doing the hard yards - the English language is rich with phrases derived from the units British people use to measure distances, sizes and quantities.

Known as imperial measures - because they were defined in law in the early 19th Century and spread across the British Empire - these units have a place in our collective vocabulary and history, but could they be about to make a comeback in every day commercial use following the vote to leave the EU?

Read more.

Labour placard

James Williams

BBC Wales political correspondent

The Welsh Labour party is offered more power to make its own decisions under plans agreed by the UK party's ruling National Executive Committee.

Read more

Mullin: I was New Labour ahead of my time

Former MP Chris Mullin looks back over his political career and the Labour Party today.
Former MP Chris Mullin looks back over his political career and the Labour Party today.

He spoke to Daily Politics presenter Jo Coburn after a film with archive from reporter Ellie Price, offering advice for those who want a career in politics.

How will UK control migration after Brexit?

Alp Mehmet from Migration Watch UK and Open Britain's James McGrory on immigration
A permit scheme limiting the number of EU workers coming to Britain after Brexit could see a cut in immigration figures.

Alp Mehmet from Migration Watch UK and Open Britain executive director James McGrory looked at what the UK could and should be doing about immigration, and free movement from EU and non-EU nations.
Jeremy Corbyn and Owen Smith

Jeremy Corbyn and Owen Smith are competing for the Labour leadership. Here's a guide to the rules of the contest - and what sparked it.

Read more

Play recalls Howe's role in Thatcher downfall

Margaret Thatcher's divisions with Geoffrey Howe are revisited in the Dead Sheep play.
Margaret Thatcher's divisions with her chancellor and foreign secretary Geoffrey Howe are revisited in a play touring the country. 

Daily Politics reporter Mark Lobel spoke to the cast of Dead Sheep at their final rehearsal, which focuses on Sir Geoffrey, rather than the leader he helped bring down.

Could the return of Tony Blair be sooner than we think?

Earlier we reported on calls in the Telegraph for Tony Blair to return to frontline politics. 

Now one of his former advisers tweets (in jest - we think): 

View more on twitter

Welsh Conservatives oppose UKIP's grammar schools call

Children at school
Getty Images

Conservative members of the Welsh Assembly have said they are "not persuaded" that allowing all schools to select pupils by ability is "appropriate" in Wales.

Prime Minister Theresa May has announced that all schools in England will be able to become selective under certain conditions, under plans also allowing grammar schools to expand.

On Wednesday, UKIP will call for the grammar system's re-introduction in Wales, in a Senedd debate.

Wales' education secretary, Lib Dem Kirsty Williams, has called grammar schools a "distraction".

Read more.

Sammy Wilson backs 'friend' Cushnahan over Nama claims

Frank Cushnahan
BBC

Ex-finance minister Sammy Wilson has backed the businessman scandalised in the biggest property deal in Northern Ireland's history as "a friend" who had done "great work".

The National Asset Management Agency sold its NI property loan portfolio for £1.2bn in 2014.

Frank Cushnahan's role in the deal has been the subject of controversy.

Mr Wilson said it should be the police who decided whether Mr Cushnahan had done anything wrong, not "a bunch of amateurs in (BBC) Spotlight".

Read more.

Zac Goldsmith questions Heathrow-government links

Conservative MP tweets...

Watch: How will UK control migration after Brexit?

The Daily Politics

Alp Mehmet from Migration Watch UK and Open Britain's James McGrory on immigration

A permit scheme limiting the number of EU workers coming to Britain after Brexit could see a cut in immigration figures.

Alp Mehmet from Migration Watch UK and Open Britain executive director James McGrory looked at what the UK could and should be doing about immigration, and free movement from EU and non-EU nations.

Mullin: I was New Labour ahead of my time

The Daily Politics

Former MP Chris Mullin looks back over his political career and the Labour Party today.

The former minister spoke to presenter Jo Coburn, offering advice for those who want a career in politics, after a film with archive from reporter Ellie Price,

Jeremy Corbyn's real-life olive branch

BBC political editor tweets...

Watch: Final hours of Labour leadership contest

The Daily Politics

Darren Williams, Luke Akehurst and Chris Mullin on changes to Labour's ruling body.

Debating changes to Labour's ruling body and the end of the leadership campaign with Darren Williams, a member of the NEC and Luke Akehurst, a former NEC member.

They spoke to Daily Politics presenter Jo Coburn and former Labour MP Chris Mullin.

Watch: Play recalls Howe's role in Thatcher downfall

Mark Lobel

Daily and Sunday Politics reporter

Margaret Thatcher's divisions with Geoffrey Howe are revisited in the Dead Sheep play.

Margaret Thatcher's divisions with her chancellor and foreign secretary Geoffrey Howe are revisited in a play touring the country.

Daily Politics reporter Mark Lobel spoke to the cast of Dead Sheep at their final rehearsal, which focuses on Sir Geoffrey, rather than the leader he helped bring down.

Brexit has had 'no major effect' on economy so far

High street
AFP

There has been little impact from the Brexit vote on the UK economy so far, says the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

"The referendum result appears, so far, not to have had a major effect," its chief economist Joe Grice said.

Official figures have not yet reflected the collapse in confidence predicted by some surveys since the referendum.

But the ONS warned that we have not yet had official figures for the service sector, which are due next week.

Read more.

British politics 'needs Tony Blair'

It's not an argument we've heard for a while but the Daily Telegraph's James Kirkup has been making the case for Tony Blair to return to the domestic political arena to fill what he says is a gaping hole in the centre - or perhaps more accurately, the metropolitan centre - of British politics. 

Yesterday, the former Labour politician announced he was winding up the bulk of his commercial ventures to focus on charity and philanthropic work, sparking a little murmur of speculation about his future intentions. 

View more on twitter

Selections should be 'as open as possible', says NEC member

The Daily Politics

Darren Williams
BBC

A member of Labour’s National Executive Committee tells the Daily Politics he supports local party members' right to remove Labour MPs who have been disloyal to Jeremy Corbyn.

“Where MPs have been consistently and publicly disloyal to and hostile the leader, where they’ve briefed against him in the media and openly plotted against him, if I were a party member in those MPs’ constituencies, I would be interested in finding an alternative representative frankly,” Darren Williams says.

He adds: “In my view we should be in a position where selections should be as open as possible and members have a genuine choice.

"Given the evident disconnect between the views of our MPs and the views of ordinary members that have emerged in recent months, it would a good thing for that choice to be made available.”

Nicolas Sarkozy talks tough over Calais

The World at One

BBC Radio 4

View more on twitter

French presidential hopeful Nicolas Sarkozy was in Calais earlier, telling local residents if he were elected he would "fix" the problem of the refugee camp there by the end of next summer.

He reiterated that immigrants seeking to come to Britain should be processed in the UK - a stance which BBC reporter Nick Beake describes as part of his effort to attract support away from rival presidential candidate Marine Le Pen.

But French commentator Agnes Poirier cautions that it should be "taken with a pinch of salt" as the agreement between the UK and France on juxtaposed border controls  "is not going to be revised any time soon". 

Scottish Labour leader calls for unity

The World at One

BBC Radio 4

Kezia Dugdale
BBC

Scottish Labour Leader Kezia Dugdale tells Radio 4 that after the new leader is elected "we need to unite around that leader," admitting "there's a bit of work to be done" before that can happen.

Ms Dugdale, who voted for Owen Smith in the leadership contest, describes her relationship with Jeremy Corbyn as "absolutely fine... we are grown-ups". 

She also welcomes plans approved by the NEC to devolve control over policy, constituency parties and Westminster candidate selections to Scotland and Wales.

"It's been very clear that I'm in charge in Scottish Labour, and I'm very pleased this will be written into NEC rules," she says. 

Watch: Ex-Labour MP on 'plotting and scheming' against Corbyn

Watch: Howe much more than a 'walk-on pompous buffoon' says playwright

Dead Sheep writer Jonathan Maitland looks at the relations between Margaret Thatcher and Geoffrey Howe

'No buyers remorse' over Brexit vote

John Curtice
BBC

Professor John Curtice has told a briefing on public opinion and the referendum that voters are showing few signs of “buyer’s remorse” at the decision to leave the EU made in June.

YouGov polls suggest that about 52% of voters think the decision was right, whereas 48% think it was a mistake - in line with the original vote. 

Professor Curtice, president of the British Polling Council, said there was little evidence of a “significant rethink” by voters despite the hopes of some pro-EU politicians.

He also said twice as many people are currently opposed to a second EU referendum than back one.

McDonnell: 'Tough' to match last year's result

The Huffington Post

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell thinks it will be "really tough" for Jeremy Corbyn to match his victory margin in last year's leadership contest, the Huffington Post reports.

Speaking at a phone bank in Clapham, he told supporters:

I think it’s going to be really tough to get the 59.5% that we got last time around because of the numbers that have been prevented from voting...some will argue if we dip below the 59.9% that somehow Jeremy’s mandate has lessened. If we win, no matter what, his mandate is still in place.”

Watch: I will loyally serve Labour, says Owen Smith

Labour leadership hopeful Owen Smith, asked in an interview in the final hours of the campaign whether he would serve in a Jeremy Corbyn shadow cabinet, said: "I won't be serving in Jeremy's cabinet but I will do what I've always done which is be Labour, vote Labour, loyally serve this party, make sure that from the backbenches I continue to make the arguments I've made during this campaign." 

Listen again: Momentum Kids founder explains mission

Today Programme

BBC Radio 4

Pro-Corbyn campaign group Momentum have set up an activity group for children, aimed at supporting parents and carers and engaging the children in politics. Natasha Josette, one of the founders of Momentum Kids, explains she wants children to be aware of the political process, not to make them into "mini-Jeremy Corbyns". 

And psychologist Dr Sam Wass and children’s author Eleanor Levenson discuss with presenter Nick Robinson whether young children are receptive to politics.

What happened to the lost Lib Dems voters?

David Grossman reports on the Liberal Democrat's lost voters
The Liberal Democrats lost more than four million votes between 2010 and 2015. What would it take to win these voters back? And can Tim Farron do it? David Grossman reports.

'Enormous turnout' in Labour leadership election

The Daily Politics

The BBC's Mark Lobel says that, according to the website LabourList, there has been a very large turnout.

If Mr Corbyn wins, Mark adds, he is expected to "offer an olive branch" to anti-Corbyn MPs at the Labour conference next week - and we might be "very surprised by the type of people who are being asked to come back into his tent".

Tom Watson's band 'hits a bum note'

The Daily Politics

Mark Lobel
BBC

BBC polticial reporter Mark Lobel tells the Daily Politics that "deputy leader Tom Watson's attempt to in his words 'put the back back together' hit a bum note" at Tuesday's meeting of Labour's national executive.

Proposals for Labour MPs to elect members of the shadow cabinet - which some saw as "crucial" for unity - have been "kicked into the long grass", Mark says.

There is a fine balance between pro- and anti-Corbyn members on the NEC at the moment, he adds.

An agreement for two new places for the Scottish and Welsh parties could lead to more anti-Corbyn members, while more pro-Corbyn members are likely to come in as well.