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Summary

  1. MPs met for questions to the Treasury ministerial team.
  2. After that, MPs debated the European Union Referendum Bill at committee stage.
  3. MPs were asked to approve a statutory instrument relating to Landfill Tax, followed by the adjournment debate.
  4. Peers met at 2.30pm for oral questions; followed by second reading of the Childcare Bill.

Live Reporting

By Ros Ball and Eleanor Gruffydd-Jones

All times stated are UK

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Close of play

House of Lords

Parliament

And with that the House of Lords adjourns for the night. Peers will be back tomorrow at 15.00 BST for oral questions. 

But do join us from 11.30 BST tomorrow for live coverage of the House of Commons.

Goodnight.

The mace is taken out of the chamber
BBC

Government priorities

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Verma closes the debate by saying that "we cannot prosper on the backs of poor people. People must come up along with us."

She tells the house the UK's priorities include focussing on the quality of services such as education, "rather than just access to education," and goes on to say, "we've got to tackle climate change.. as an integral part of our work on poverty eradication."

On ensuring gender equality, she says "it continues to be an absolute travesty that half of the world's population so often cannot participate in education, work or public life." She adds that the government wants to see gender equality "as a stand alone goal but it must cut across all our programmes."

Summing up

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Verma is summing up for the government. She congratulates those peers taking part in the 'Below the Line' challenge who are living on £1 a day. She tells peers, on the issue of poverty, that "no one must be left behind."

Baroness Verma says the UN summit in September will set the direction for international development for the next 15 years. She goes on to reflect on previous achievements telling the House that in 2000 the international community agreed the millenium development goals and "the years since have seen the greatest ever reduction of poverty."

Baroness Verma
BBC

Home time

House of Commons

Parliament

The Commons has finished its work for the day.

Join them tomorrow for Wales questions, followed by Prime Minister's Questions, which, this week, is in the hands of the PM's deputy, George Osborne, whilst David Cameron is away touring Europe.

Pushing to be ambitious

House of Lords

Parliament

Summing up for the opposition in the House of Lords debate on the UK Sustainable Development Goals, Lord Collins of Highbury says, "this side of the House has been clear where our priorities would be. Tackling inequality, ensuring the attainment of human rights, including the fundamental rights of women and girls, remain at the heart of these agreements. And of course combating climate change."

He closes by saying, "I hope tonight the minister is able to match our ambition in this field." 

Lord Collins of Highbury
BBC

Good goals

Conservative peer tweets:

Good debate on SUstainable Development Goals ably introduced by @LordMcConnell and interesting cost benefit analysis by @mattwridley.

Long term solution

House of Commons

Parliament

James Brokenshire stresses to the Houses that the government needs to deal with the "root causes, not just the consequences" in order to stop putting people in this dangerous position.

He ends by stating the government's commitment to "generous funding and maximum support" to a long term solution and working with EU partners.

Minister responds

House of Commons

Parliament

James Brokenshire
BBC

Home Office Minister James Brokenshire thanks Keith Vaz for bringing the debate to the House as it is a "stark reminder" that something needs to be done about traffickers and criminal gangs who "do not care if people live or die" and who are profiting from the "human misery" and desperation of refugees.

Regarding the government's action, he says "all options are being considered regarding the withdrawal of HMS Bulwark and the "government is continuing to work with European partners".

'Graveyard of Europe'

House of Commons

Parliament

The former home affairs committee chair Keith Vaz wraps up by saying that the "Mediterranean has now become the graveyard of Europe" and "to fail to act now could result in one of the greatest betrayals in history".

UK mission

House of Commons

Parliament

Keith Vaz commends the government's action in despatching HMS Bulwark to the Mediterranean and the naval personnel helping rescue thousands of migrants from the sea.  He asks the minister that Bulwark be "adequately replaced" by a similar mission when its tour of duty ends in July.

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Keith Vaz
BBC

Labour MP Keith Vaz is introducing his adjournment debate on the refugee situation in the Mediterranean.

Mr Vaz says this is the "worse displacement crisis since the Second World War", citing that 1,727 people have drowned in the last six months and this is set to exceed 3000 by the end of the year.

Refugees are fleeing from the volatile and dangerous situation in Libya and trying to cross the Mediterranean to the Italian island of Lampedusa.

"Calling for a political solution is not enough", he says and adds that efforts should be made to "support the UN mission" and to bring parties in Libya "to the table".

Below the line lunch

Labour peer tweets:

Great admiration 4 @Baronessjenkin @LordMcConnell @LBLUK delighted to join them for delicious 33p lunch

Great admiration 4 @Baronessjenkin @LordMcConnell @LBLUK delighted to join them for delicious 33p lunch

Motion passed

House of Commons

Parliament

Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury Damian Hinds addresses the concerns expressed on the floor in the course of this very short debate on the Landfill Tax. 

He replies to Labour's Alison McGovern speaking on behalf of the opposition saying that the landfill tax has been successful in helpful to reduce landfill waste by 70% since 2000 and the average household recycling rates increase from 18 to 44%.

MPs then vote in favour to approve the statutory instrument proposed.

UN Sustainable Development Goals

House of Lords

Parliament

Over in the House of Lords, peers are holding a short debate on government priorities for the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The debate was tabled by Lord McConnell of Glenscorrodale who has been taking part in a charity challenge titled 'Below the Line', which asks people to live on £1 a day for 5 days.

Conservative peer Viscount Ridley rises to speak and expresses his admiration for Lord McConnell telling him that there are "free cheese biscuits in the Bishops bar."

He goes on to say that solving poverty is not like solving a mathematical problem. He says there is no right or wrong answer and that "it is vital... that we set priorities, setting aside sentimental commitments and do the hard work of assessing costs and benefits."

Lord McConnell
BBC
Viscount Ridley
BBC

What's the debate about?

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now considering a statutory instrument to introduce a "loss on ignition" test to help identify how much businesses who dispose of their waste in landfills should pay.

Twisted arms

The Daily Telegraph Chief Political Correspondent tweets:

Tory sources telling me 15 to 20 Conservative MPs backed rebel Bill Cash amendment. Philip Hammond's arm twisting has worked (to a degree).

SNP new clause defeated

House of Commons

Parliament

Yet another attempt to put 'purdah' provisions into the bill has failed with 75 voting in favour and 313 voting against.

The business moves on to a motion to approve a Statutory Instrument relating to landfill tax.

Labour abstain

Parliamentary website tweets

If Lab had not abstained on #purdah the govt would have been defeated just five weeks into this new parliament

Many bums on seats

House of Commons

Parliament

Commons
BBC
MPs waiting for the result of the vote on amendment 11

Another 'purdah' vote

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs divide again, this time on the SNP's new clause 3, which prescribes a period of “purdah” in the four weeks before the referendum.

'Purdah' amendment falls

House of Commons

Parliament

Sir Bill Cash's amendment 11 is defeated by a majority of 191 votes with 97 voting for and 288 against.

PM steps in

Huffington Post's political editor tweets:

David Cameron is in the House, as we speak personally trying to persuade Tory MPs not to back Cash amendment

Voting on 'purdah'

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs divide on amendment 11, which would apply “purdah” rules to the official campaign period in the run-up to the EU Referendum day.

Addressing amendments

House of Commons

Parliament

John Penrose turns to the issue of campaign funding from external sources and says "nowhere on the permitted organisation list" does it allow "an institution like the EU" to get involved, which takes care of amendment 10.

Onto Sir Edward Leigh's amendment on ensuring equal campaign resources for both sides, Mr Penrose understands his intentions in restricting "arms" (referring to the number of campaigners) but would not work in the way he describes.

Campaign time

House of Commons

Parliament

Cabinet Office Minister John Penrose responds to amendments raised today.

He starts by addressing Sir Bill Cash's amendment 9 to prescribe a minimum 16-week official campaign period. 

He encourages "both sides of the debate to engage with Electoral Commission", so they can unofficially start campaigning before the official campaign period begins. 

John Penrose
BBC

Invest now

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Suri
BBC

Conservative peer Lord Suri says investing more money into childcare policy now will reap long-term socio-economic benefits. 

He says having both parents working is beneficial to the child's upbringing and that future generations can learn "that both men and women can have successful careers while raising a family". He adds, "the more people Britain has working, the better."

Recap: EU Referendum Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

*MPs are midway through day 1 of the committee stage debate on theEU Referendum Bill. 

*Government amendment 55 has been added to the bill.This gives eurosceptic Tory rebels and SNP MPs reassurances that the referendum won't be held on the day as devolved parliamentary elections in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland on 5 May 2016. 

*Vote on "purdah" amendments will take place at 7pm.Conservative MP Sir Bill Cash leads the charge with his amendment to apply the “purdah" rules to EU referendum campaign period. Europe Minister David Lidington has told MPs the government will bring forward its own proposals at report stage in the autumn after consulting MPs. 

One-earner families disadvantaged

House of Lords

Parliament

DUP peer Lord Browne of Belmont has concerns about the lack of provision for what he calls 'one-earner couple families'. He says they have a higher tax burden and they lose child benefit when the single household earner receives more than £50,000, whereas two-earner families can earn much more before losing that benefit.

Lord Browne says that many couples would choose to care for their own children if they could afford it. He goes on to say that the government is urging women to "choose their career over their family".

Lord Browne of Belmont
BBC

Government like 'Caesar's wife'

House of Commons

Parliament

Jacob Rees-Mogg
BBC

Conservative MP Jacob Rees-Mogg rises in support of amendments relating to fairer campaign funding and spending.

True to form, he drops in a classical reference saying "the government, like Caesar's wife must be above suspicion".

Regarding purdah, he argues the government getting "too close to the deadline with its own view" is damaging for "the cause that I believe in" and using the machinery of government in its campaigning, is a "fundamentally unfair way of dealing with it".

It needs to be a "thorough purdah", he maintains.

And MPs need to make sure that the referendum is held without influence from the EU, he adds.

Missing child

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour peer Baroness Massey of Darwen says she has the greatest respect for the minister, but she sees issues that need to be resolved in the Childcare Bill. 

She says any bill, especially one with the word child in it, must make clear that the welfare of the child is paramount. She goes on to say she sees no mention of the child in the bill "at all".

Principle and substance

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Howarth of Breckland
BBC

Crossbench peer Baroness Howarth of Breckland gets up to say that over the years her experience of the Lords has been working to add principles to the face of complex bills. 

She says: 

I think this is my first experience of a bill that is a principle with little other substance...it doesn't meet the government objectives of coherence of the various policies nor explain how the tension between the two central policy planks - improving child outcomes by narrowing the attainment gap and facilitating parental employment - will be addressed."

No European Commission interference

House of Commons

Parliament

Sir Gerald Howarth
BBC

Conservative MP Sir Gerald Howarth rises in support of Sir Edward Leigh and Sir Bill Cash's amendments as it is "right and proper" to be "as precise in framing the rules for this referendum as possible".

He has put his name to the latter amendment, which would regulate on campaign funding from EU bodies, claiming not to not want the European Commission interfering in "any shape or form in our domestic debate".

Those who think the European Commission to be "even-handed" in this matter "have another thing coming", he states.

'Disturbingly ill-defined' powers

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord True
BBC

Conservative peer Lord True says there is a danger in forgetting the contribution of mothers who stay at home in the debate. He asks: "Has the state really resolved to discriminate against families where one person does not work but instead devotes full time to childcare?"

Lord True says the point leads him to ask who and what the policy is for. He says: "Surely the centre of any education policy must be the child, not increasing household disposable income."

Lord True goes to to draw attention to the make-up of the bill and says he agrees with other peers that the "regulation making powers in this bill are disturbingly wide, disturbingly ill-defined and draconian. Potentially they could lead to effective state control of the whole sector by the back door."

'Fun' referendums

House of Commons

Parliament

Peter Grant
BBC

SNP MP Peter Grant addresses Sir Edward Leigh's amendment 53 on ensuring equal campaign spending. 

He warns that enforcing this amendment would "artificially restrict the number of individuals", in what should be "a celebration of grass-roots democracy". 

That's what made the Scottish Referendum "such fun", he says, as well as causing "a record turnout" and "increased voter engagement".

Quality childcare needed

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Earl Listowel says he is concerned like some other peers that the childcare that is provided under the bill needs to be high quality.

He says that a report from the Children's Society highlighted how we have forgotten children as a society. He says it suggested that parents put their own concerns before their children's. 

Earl Listowel says he is encouraged by the need for childcare staff to have higher qualifications but would like to see the level improved. He goes on to ask the minister to let him know what percentage of staff he expects to be graduates. 

Earl Listowel
BBC

From a sedentary position

House of Commons

Parliament

Bill Cash
BBC

Sir Bill Cash, who has been given dispensation to address the House from the comfort of the green benches as he has not been well, speaks on amendment 10 on electoral spending.

He wants the Electoral Commission to ensure that funds or support provided directly or indirectly by EU bodies do not have influence on the referendum outcome.

Zero-hours penalty

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat Baroness Bakewell of Hardington Mandeville asks the minister to assure her that parents who work under zero-hours contracts will not be penalised under the Childcare Bill and lose out on provision. 

She says the bill is a huge step in the right direction but she remains concerned about some of the finer details.

A back-handed compliment

House of Commons

Parliament

Alex Salmond
BBC

SNP Alex Salmond gets to his feet to say there are "severe deficiencies in this bill" and does not think the government has given "adequate thought" on issues regarding 'purdah'.

However, he does welcome the concession made by the government on tabling amendment 55 regarding the referendum date - and asks whether it was scheduled at the last minute out of "blind panic" or "flexibility in listening".