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Summary

  1. We joined the House of Commons after prime minister's questions, as Elfyn Llwyd introduced a ten minute rule bill.
  2. The day's main business was the report stage and third reading of the Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill.
  3. After that, there was an opposition day debate on future government spending.
  4. The adjournment debate, led by UKIP MP Douglas Carswell, was on competition in the financial services industry.
  5. Peers met at 15.00 GMT for oral questions; followed by the third reading of the Modern Slavery Bill.
  6. After that peers completed the third reading of the Deregulation Bill.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight

    And that brings an end to today's business in the Houses of Parliament.

    MPs will be back from 9.30 GMT for transport questions, while peers will return at 11.00 GMT for a series of debates led by backbench peers.

  2. 'Unlawful' order

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Pannick withdraws his motion to regret, but only because he believes "the courts will inevitably add this order to the long list of [Lord Chancellor Chris Grayling's] regulations that have been declared unlawful in the last three years."

  3. 'Overestimated' benefit

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Marks

    Liberal Democrat peer and QC Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames warns that the expected benefit to the exchequer of £120m from these changes is likely to be "substantially overestimated."

    A decrease in the number of claims made will "make it far more difficult for small solicitors firms to survive in the largely difficult post legal aid climate" and thus reduce the amount of tax recovered by the exchequer from these firms.

  4. 'Selling justice'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former supreme court justice Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood joins the objections to the order, which he says turns the court system into a "profit making enterprise" which allows the "selling [of] justice".

    He rejects the idea that court system must on principle be "self sufficient" as the justice system "properly exists for the benefit of society and the economy as a whole. "

  5. Motion to regret

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Pannick

    Crossbench peer and human rights lawyer Lord Pannick moves a motion to regret these new measures which he says will do "incredible damage to the UK's legal heritage."

    Requiring claimants to pay an up front court fee of up to £10,000 will "impeded access to justice" as any individuals and small businesses will not have those funds available and so will be denied access to the courts, he argues.

    If passed the motion will note the House of Lords disproval of the legislation.

  6. Approval motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn their attention to a motion to approve the draft Civil and Family Proceedings (Amendment) Fees Order, which will require those those suing for breach of contract or personal injuries to pay an up front court fee of 5% of the claim up to £10,000.

    Moving the motion Justice Minister Lord Faulks argues that these changes are needed is to ensure "courts are properly funded". Further reductions in the public cost of the courts system "are essential" to ensure the court system is able to provide its services, the "challenge is to do more with less" he argues.

  7. Bill passed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Deregulation Bill has passed all stages in both the Commons and the Lords and is now in a process known as parliamentary "ping pong".

    Both Houses must agree on the final form of the bill before it can proceed to royal assent and become law.

  8. Amendment passed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town adds Labour's support for the changes and the amendment is passed unanimously.

  9. Licensed Conveyancers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Wallace of Saltaire

    Cabinet Office Minster Lord Wallace of Saltaire is now on his feet making the argument for increasing the scope of individuals or bodies that can provide licensed conveyancers services - property law specialists who work on behalf of clients buying or selling property.

    Currently only those who have passed an exam can be accredited to work by the Council for Licensed Conveyancers - the only legal services approved regulator that requires such a qualification. These amendments would remove this restriction.

  10. Amendment rejected

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers reject the amendment by 145 votes to 87, a government majority of 58.

  11. No more bureaucratic

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord De Mauly

    Lord De Mauley questions whether the new system is "really adding bureaucracy compared to the current system."

    The London system allows fines of up to £110 for simple transgression such as leaving a bin lid open, where as the new system would change the law so that it was no longer a criminal offence in England to fail to comply with local arrangements for household waste collection, and reduce fines to below those given to for criminal convictions - between £60-80 - he says.

    If the new system is not rolled out completely "we would be in the anomalous position where local authorities can issue a penalty to householders who make any sort of mistake in London but not anywhere else in England" Lord de Mauly says.

    Baroness Hanham isn't convinced however, and pushes the amendment to a vote.

  12. 'Bureaucratic and Byzantine scheme'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hanham

    Baroness Hanham is back on her feet attacking what she sees as another example of the government trying to "override London."

    Under the bill a new system of fixed penalties will be applied in England for failure to comply with household waste collection arrangements. But London has been running its own waste penalty system since 2007 - which she says is the forerunner to the government's proposals - and should be exempted from this new "bureaucratic and Byzantine scheme", she argues.

  13. Amendment rejected

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers ultimately reject Labour's amendments by 182 votes to 145, a government majority of 37.

  14. Labour amendments

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers divide on a series of Labour amendments to the government proposals which would:

    • require those using short-term lets to notify their local authority,
    • reduce the total rental time from 90 days to 60 days per year
    • restrict short term lets to the principal property only
    • allow local authorities to disapply the scheme without application to the secretary of state
    • allow greater scope for punishing those who break the new rules.
  15. Goodbye from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That brings today's business in the Commons to an end, slightly earlier than usual for a Wednesday.

    MPs are back tomorrow from 09.30 GMT for transport questions.

    The main business consists of two backbench debates: the first on International Women's Day and the second on Welsh affairs.

    Stay with us tonight though, as the House of Lords continues its debate on the Deregulation Bill.

  16. Exempting boroughs

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Several peers are not fans of the government's plans to allow town halls to apply to the Secretary of State to agree to small localised exemptions from the new plans in "exceptional circumstances".

    They believe it should be entirely for local authorities to decide whether they opt out of the new flexibilities.

    Conservative peer Baroness Gardner sums up the feelings of many peers as she says "to leave this in the hands of the Secretary of State is just wrong".

  17. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrea Leadsom has stuck around after the opposition debate to reply to the adjournment debate too.

    She says the government has championed credit unions, peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding - and backed "innovation" in financial services.

  18. 'Overriding' London

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer and former leader of Kensington and Chelsea London Borough Council Baroness Hanham accuses the government of trying to override what London wants.

    The government should have put forward agreements that had the blessing of all London authorities, but her former council is "stolidly against" these proposals, she says, while seven other boroughs raised concerns.

  19. Mark Reckless' contribution

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Douglas Carswell's fellow UKIP MP, Mark Reckless, rises to make his own contribution to the debate after being gently rebuked by the Speaker for not seeking the minister's agreement in advance.

    Mark Reckless
  20. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tonight's final, short debate is on competition in the financial services industry.

    UKIP MP Douglas Carswell is leading this debate, arguing that there has been too much centralisation of financial services and calling for more competition.

    Douglas Carswell
  21. Petitions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A number of remaining orders of the day are quickly dealt with and MPs are presenting petitions from their constituents.

  22. Labour motion defeated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs reject the Labour motion by 298 votes to 216 - a government majority of 82.

  23. Vote in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide on Labour's motion, which calls the government's economic policy a "failing austerity plan".

    The motion calls for a "fairer and more balanced approach, which involves sensible reductions in public spending, a reversal of this government's £3 billion-a-year top rate of income tax cut for people earning over £150,000 and an economic plan that delivers the sustained rises in living standards needed to boost tax revenues".

  24. 'Strong NHS'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "You cannot have a strong NHS without a strong economy," Andrea Leadsom argues.

    Andrea Leadsom
  25. 'Scaremongering'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister Andrea Leadsom accuses Labour of "scaremongering".

    She says unemployment has fallen, adding that international figures including President Obama and IMF head Christine Lagarde have praised the UK's economic performance.

  26. Short Term Rents

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to a series of amendments to extended short-term letting regulations to London, with the aim of allowing Londoners to take part in the "revolution" in short-term letting websites.

    Under the proposals, Londoners will be allowed to let out their house, flat or spare room on a short-term basis for up to 60 days per year.

    Currently, homeowners in the capital are banned from letting out their property for less than three months, under the Greater London Council Act 1973, unless they have planning permission. The legislation aimed to protect the housing supply in London.

  27. 'Fully funded'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cathy Jamieson says Labour would reverse the income tax cut for those earning over £150,000 and introduce a mansion tax.

    "All our spending commitments will be fully funded," she tells MPs.

    Cathy Jamieson
  28. Closing opposition speech

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Treasury minister Cathy Jamieson repeats Labour's assertion that the government has "failing austerity plans".

    The opposition motion claims that the "failing austerity plan set out in the Chancellor's Autumn Statement which the Office for Budget Responsibility has said will take public spending back to a share of national income not seen since the late 1930s".

    It "notes that the Institute for Fiscal Studies has said that this would entail cuts on a colossal scale and has raised concerns that this could involve a fundamental reimagining of the role of the state".

  29. Health and Safety exemptions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In an attempt to placate opponents to new measures to exempt self-employed workers who pose no risk to others from the scope of the Health and Safety at Work Act, the government table an amendment to give Parliament the final say, via a vote, on which type of jobs will be exempt.

  30. 'An end to this government'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP William Bain argues that "seeing an end to this government is absolutely critical".

    He tells MPs that the government's policies have caused "exceptional hardship to our constituents".

  31. Claims 'ridiculous'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Andrew Jones says the Labour motion for debate today is "nonsense".

    He adds: "Claims that we're heading back to the 1930s are ridiculous."

  32. Modern Slavery Bill passes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And with that the Modern Slavery Bill passes its final stage in the House of Lords. Peers now turn their attention to the Deregulation Bill.

  33. Amendment defeated

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment is defeated by 232 votes to 205, a government majority of 27.

  34. 'Dreary collection of bungs'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Stewart Jackson says that Labour under Tony Blair had a "forward-looking" and "optimistic" programme which gave it victory in the 1997 election.

    Now, he claims, Labour is pursuing a "core vote strategy" and offering a "dreary collection of bungs to special interest groups".

    He also calls Labour's proposed energy price freeze a "disastrous policy that has damaged that industry" and will "perversely" damage the interests of consumers as well.

  35. Guidance needed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates agues that the bill is the wrong place for this measures. While he agrees that a central website would be helpful, it also has its weaknesses, he says, and " some kind of search engine or comparison tool might be more efficient ... and allow work be verified more easily."

    Regulatory requirements are better handled in "statutory guidance" which can be updated and "stay alive to future innovations."

    Lord Alton, however, isn't convinced. He tells peers that "there are moments when parliament needs to help ministers out", and pushes the motion to a vote.

  36. 'Poor made poorer'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP David Anderson says the government has "made life desperate for those who rely on benefits".

    "People who were already poor have been made poorer", he says.

    He claims that, despite Conservative denials, "the NHS is on a rapid route to privatisation" if the Tories win the next election.

    David Anderson
  37. 'Clearly' need a website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Butler-Sloss

    Former High Court Judge Baroness Butler-Sloss is on her feet supporting Lord Alton's amendment. "If businesses are to produce reports there is no point if they are only looked at by their own people. They need to be subject to independent and transparent scrutiny" she argues.

    "It seems absolutely clear that there has to be a central independent website", she says.

  38. 'Austerity has failed'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP Treasury spokesman Stewart Hosie says the government "pledged" to cut the deficit as a proportion of GDP by 2014-15 but "the debt will not now begin to fall as a share of GDP until 2016-17 at the earliest".

    "In short, the chancellor and this government has failed to meet a single one of the targets they set themselves," he argues.

    "The inescapable conclusion is that austerity has failed."

    Stewart Hosie
  39. Slavery report website

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Alton of Liverpool moves an amendment to create a website to hold all slavery reports from business - which state what companies are doing to ensure there is no forced labour within supply chains.

    Without a central repository it will be "very difficult if not nigh on impossible" for the public to hold businesses to account, as companies will be able to hide their reports, Lord Alton argues.

  40. 'Bankruptcy'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Brooks Newmark, speaking in the debate on future government spending, claims that the UK was on the verge of bankruptcy when the coalition took power in 2010.

    He highlights measures such as raising the personal allowance for taxpayers as government successes.

    Labour's Andrew Gwynne intervenes to claim that "the welfare bill is up by £25bn" as a result of housing benefit increases and "the failure of low pay".

  41. More flexibility

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Quoting Jeremy Oppenheim, who led a recent review into how the UK deals with Slavery, Home Office Minister Lord Bates warns that enshrining minimum support in the bill will take away "from the flexibility of tailoring the needs to potential victims", and it is "better not put on a statutory footing."

    Lord McColl is convinced, and agrees to withdraw his amendment.

  42. Minimum support

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord McColl of Dulwich moves an amendment calling for the minimum level of support provided to victims of slavery to be expressly set out in the bill.

    The measure, he says, will "give confidence to victims and support workers that they will receive support and encourage more victims to come forward."

    A strong framework set out in primary legislation will also "ensure constant standards of care across the country" and allow greater parliamentary scrutiny, which is "normally lacking in secondary legislation", he adds.

  43. 'Tailored' duties

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers agree to a series of technical amendments from the government, allowing it to "tailor" the relationships between the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner - set up under the bill - and the public organisations it will be required to work with.

    This increased freedom will allow the commissioner to work with more public bodies, as their duties and responsibilities can "better reflect the particular functions and the legislative framework of the authorities", government spokeswoman Baroness Garden of Frognal says.

  44. Modern Slavery Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move to the third reading of the Modern Slavery Bill, its final stage in the House of Lords.

  45. 'Drums of war'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord West of Spithead

    Former Chief of Naval Staff Lord West of Spithead accuses the government of being "horrifyingly complacent" over defence spending - which he says has been cut by 30% since 2010.

    "There seems to be a generation of leaders who assume peace is the natural order of things and war is inconceivable. But war drums are beating in eastern Europe," he warns.

    He calls on the government to take defence spending "out of the realm of politics" by brokering a deal with the opposition to keep spending at 2% of GDP on defence, as required by Nato. This would send as strong deterrent to eastern Europe, he argues, as "military forces deter".

    Defence Minister Lord Astor of Hever agrees to pass on Lord West's comments to the prime minister but denies there is a crisis in defence spending. The UK has the "second largest defence budget in Nato and will spend more than £160bn over the next 10 years equipping the armed forces" he says, putting the UK's defence spending above 2% of GDP until the next spending review.

  46. 'Long-term economic plan'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister David Gauke, opening for the government, uses the often-heard Conservative pre-election refrain of the moment.

    He welcomes another opportunity to talk about "the long-term economic plan".

    He claims that Labour left the public finances in a "disastrous" state in 2010 and the government is "putting Britain back on track".

  47. Public spending clash

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's motion attacks what it calls a "failing austerity plan set out in the Chancellor's Autumn Statement which the Office for Budget Responsibility has said will take public spending back to a share of national income not seen since the late 1930s, before the National Health Service came into existence".

    Conservative MP Stephen Hammond claims that independent economic research unit the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) has said the plans "will neither destroy the NHS nor return public services to 1930s provision".

    But Labour's Chris Leslie accuses the Conservatives of having "extreme plans".

    New analysis from the IFS suggests median household income in 2014-15 has returned to around the same level as it was in 2007-08, before the recession.

  48. 'Settle down!'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Dawn Primarolo intervenes as Labour and Conservative MP shout claims and counter-claims across the chamber.

    "I think it should all settle down now!" she chides Conservative MPs heckling Chris Leslie's speech.

    Deputy Speaker Dawn Primarolo
  49. Sudan 'genocide'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Founder and CEO of the Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust Baroness Cox calls on the government to step in to end the "genocide" being perpetrated by the government in Sudan "with impunity".

    She tells peers she has visited the Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states where schools, hospitals and markets are being targeted by aerial bombardments from the country's air force, forcing citizens to flee to "snake infested caves, or live under trees".

    International Development Minister Baroness Northover replies that the government are "pressing" the Sudanese authorities to agree to a ceasefire and "comply with humanitarian law" unilaterally, and have raised the issue with the UN Security Council and Human Rights Council.

  50. 'Tracking' bills

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Stowell of Beeston

    In answer to a supplementary question, Baroness Stowell of Beeston tells peers that there are plans to introduce "tracking" facilities for bills online, which provide links to explanatory notes, from the beginning of the next parliament.

  51. Government 'delusional'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The shadow chief secretary to the Treasury, Chris Leslie, is opening the debate for Labour.

    He tells MPs on the government side that "they are either delusional or they are perhaps not feeling particularly well" if they think the deficit has been brought under control.

    He argues the Conservatives are driven by a belief in "shrinking the state".

    Chris Leslie
  52. Digital parliament

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Deech has the first question in the House of Lords. She uses it to urge the government to "digitise" the work of the House of Lords and make bills easier to understand.

    If bill amendments were online with easily accessible notes explaining the impact of the changes "it would be a great advantage" to peers, many of whom can understand the dense legal language the bills are currently printed in, she argues.

    Leader of the House Baroness Stowell of Beeston agrees that the House should use "new technologies where they will help us do our work better."

  53. House of Commons procedures

    Jack Straw - a former leader of the House of Commons - is giving evidence to the Procedure Committee now.

    He's currently talking about PMQs and how it has changed from two 15 minute sessions to one 30 minute sessions. He is also discussing the procedure by which private members' bills are discussed.

    You can watch the committee here.

  54. Opposition day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to a Labour-led debate on future government spending.

    The motion criticises the government's economic policy, calling it a "failing austerity plan".

    It calls for "an economic plan that delivers the sustained rises in living standards needed to boost tax revenues".

  55. Tribute to ex-marine killed in Syria

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill passes its third reading and will now go to the House of Lords.

    Labour MP Dan Jarvis uses a point of order to pay tribute to his constituent, Konstandinos Erik Scurfield.

    Mr Scurfield, 25, from Barnsley, South Yorkshire, is thought to be the first British person killed fighting Islamic State extremists alongside Kurdish forces in Syria.

    Konstandinos Erik Scurfield
    Image caption: Konstandinos Erik Scurfield was described as "an expert in battlefield medicine"
  56. Post update

    @murrisonMP

    Conservative MP Andrew Murrison tweets: DUP's Ian Paisley making particularly good 3rd reading speech on Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill right now in Commons.

  57. Picture: DUP's Ian Paisley Jr

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ian Paisley Jr
    Image caption: The North Antrim MP smiles after being mildly reproved by Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing
  58. House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Our live coverage of the House of Lords is about to begin.

    Following oral questions at 14.30 GMT, two more bills are due for their third readings. First, the Modern Slavery Bill - the government suffered a defeat at report stage on 25 February, when peers passed an amendment from the Crossbencher, Lord Hylton, which gives greater protection to overseas domestic workers.

    Then peers move on to the third reading of the Deregulation Bill - key issues will include health and safety, with votes likely, as the government's proposals are unlikely to go far enough for many peers.

    Final business in the chamber is a regret motion from the Crossbench peer and human rights lawyer, Lord Pannick, on an Statutory Instrument on Civil Proceedings and Family Proceedings fees.

  59. Alliance view

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Naomi Long, the Alliance MP for East Belfast, says there are challenges ahead.

    One of them, she says, is in investment and skills. "There is no point in reducing corporation tax...if we do not have the skilled workers to take up employment in those companies," she says.

    She calls for a renewed investment in skills and the "right" skills, such as engineering for infrastructure.

  60. Northern Ireland investment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee Laurence Robertson rises to speak during the third reading of the bill.

    He says that Northern Ireland's geographical position means that it has to have "something different" to attract that investment.

  61. Corporation tax rates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The main rate of corporation tax is currently 21% in the UK compared to 12.5% on trading income in the Republic of Ireland.

    The major parties in Northern Ireland hope that cutting corporation tax will create stronger growth.

    The devolution of corporation tax will mean Northern Ireland's block grant being cut by £325m a year, according to a Treasury estimate.

  62. More about the bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill allows Northern Ireland Assembly to set the rate of corporation tax in respect of certain trading profits but continue to pay the UK rate on non-trading profits.

    Trading profits refer to the buying and selling of goods and services but not income from property.

    The devolved powers would apply to micro, small or medium-sized companies largely based in Northern Ireland.

    The new powers could be applied to large companies who have a "Northern Ireland Regional Establishment" (NIRE) - a fixed place of business such as an office or factory.

  63. Third reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Durkan declines to push his amendment to a vote, though he hints that a similar one could be introduced when the bill is considered in the House of Lords.

    As that was the only report stage amendment, debate moves on to third reading.

  64. 'Indigenous' businesses

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SDLP MP for Foyle, Mark Durkan, defends his amendment.

    He says he wants the lower rate of Northern Ireland corporation tax to apply to "wholly-grown, indigenous" mutual societies and credit unions rather than multinationals.

    Mark Durkan
  65. Remaining stages

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have agreed a programme motion to debate the bill at report stage and third reading this afternoon.

    Report stage is the consideration of the bill as amended by a public bill committee - the "report" of the committee.

    This stage gives MPs a chance to table further amendments if they wish.

    Third reading is the final debate on the general principles of the bill as a whole.

  66. 'Profit-shifting'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister David Gauke says the government wants to avoid "profit-shifting around the UK" by ensuring that the lower rate of corporation tax does not apply to "profits from highly mobile activities" such as lenders who operate across the UK.

    He argues that including building societies in the lower rate of corporation tax could "undermine those principles".

    It could also give building societies "a competitive advantage over banks" which is not the aim of the bill.

  67. 'Excluded trades'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Mark Durkan is introducing an amendment which would add insurance companies, building societies and credit unions to the list of "excluded trades".

    He is concerned about the impact of corporation tax on credit unions and mutual societies and asks for reassurances from the government.

  68. Stormont House Agreement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The UK government has promised to devolve powers over corporation tax to the Northern Ireland Executive as part of the Stormont House Agreement between political leaders in December last year.

    The power to vary the rate would enable Northern Ireland to compete with the lower rate of corporation tax in the Republic of Ireland to try to attract foreign investment.

    However, any reduction in corporation tax will involve a cut to Stormont's block grant under the Barnett formula for distributing public spending around the UK.

    Stormont politicians
    Image caption: The Stormont House Agreement was published after a final 30-hour final push at the end of the talks in December
  69. Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs quickly dispose of the Supply and Appropriation (Anticipation and Adjustments) Bill, which authorises the use of public funds for the years ending 31 March 2014, 31 March 2015 and 31 March 2016.

    MPs are now debating the Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill, which devolves powers over the tax to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

  70. MPs standing down

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The website Parliamentary Candidates UK counts 87 MPs who are not standing again in May.

  71. About the bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Elfyn Llwyd's ten minute rule bill aims to help victims of crime, including training criminal justice staff about the impact of crime on victims.

    The Plaid Cymru MP for Dwyfor Meirionnydd, who leads his party at Westminster, is one of eight Welsh MPs from all sides of the House who will be stepping down at the forthcoming general election.

    Elfyn Llwyd
  72. Post update

    ‏@jameschappers

    James Chapman (Mail) tweets: Labour MP Paul Flynn brands today's #pmqs "the worst ever" in point of order #pmqs

  73. What else?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After that, there will be an Opposition Day debate - the last of this Parliament - on future government spending.

    And the final item of business of the day is an adjournment debate from UKIP MP Douglas Carswell - the subject is competition in the financial services industry.

  74. Welcome to Commons coverage

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    We join the House of Commons after the sound and fury of PMQs has died down.

    MPs will spend the rest of the day debating other matters.

    The first item on the agenda is a ten minute rule bill from the Plaid Cymru MP Elfyn Llwyd entitled Victims (Bill of Rights) Bill.

    The main legislation of the day is the Corporation Tax (Northern Ireland) Bill which MPs will be considering at report stage and third reading.