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Live Reporting

Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that's it for today in the Commons.

    MPs will return from 11.30 GMT tomorrow for Treasury questions.

    Later, MPs will debate a bill which will allow Northern Ireland to set its own rate of corporation tax.

  2. 'Horrific, evil and brutal'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Rehman Chishti, leading the debate, condemns the "horrific, evil and brutal attack".

    Rehman Chishti
  3. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final, short debate today concerns UK support for Pakistan following the massacre in Peshawar.

    In December more than 150 people, most of them children, were killed in a Taliban attack on an army public school in Peshawar.

    Since the attack the Pakistan government has lifted the moratorium on the death penalty and resumed executions.

    The local government in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa has proposed a plan to allow teachers to carry guns.

  4. Bill passes third reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Infrastructure passes its third reading without a vote and the Houses approve the remaining orders of the day.

    MPs are now presenting petitions from their constituents.

  5. 'Think again'

    SNP MP Mike Weir says his party wanted a moratorium on fracking to avoid any new licences being granted in Scotland before powers over licensing are devolved.

    He claims Labour's amendment imposing conditions before fracking can take place, which MPs agreed earlier, will not stop shale gas extraction.

    And he urges the government to "think again about the transfer of powers".

    Mike Weir
  6. More on the Infrastructure Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill's many provisions include giving communities the right to buy stakes in local renewable electricity generation facilities.

    Construction firms will be able to offset the carbon emissions of new homes after they have been built.

    Where a developer chooses not to go for zero carbon development, the bill allows them to make up for this by donating to green schemes.

    The bill will allow for Species Control Orders to control invasive, non-native species that pose environmental threats.

  7. 'Improvements'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow transport minister Richard Burden says Labour has secured "improvements" to the bill, in the House of Lords as well as the Commons.

    Richard Burden
    Image caption: Richard Burden makes the closing speech for the Labour front bench
  8. Third reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    We're on the final straight in the debate on the Infrastructure Bill.

    Third reading gives MPs a final chance to consider the amended bill as a whole.

    Opening the debate, Transport Minister John Hayes calls this "a bold bill".

  9. Labour defeat

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Labour amendment is defeated by a 323 votes to 203 - a government majority of 120.

  10. Highways Agency

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Infrastructure Bill would enable the Highways Agency - which manages motorways and major roads in England - to be turned from an executive agency into a government-owned company.

    The sections of the bill allowing a company to be appointed as a highway authority apply only to a company which is "wholly owned by the secretary of state".

  11. End of Lords business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord West argues that drones are posing a "very real danger" that must be addressed but, while he maintains that new legislation needs to be brought forward, he withdraws his amendment.

    And that brings to an end today's business in the House of Lords.

    Peers will be back tomorrow at 14.30 GMT for the report stage of the Pension Schemes Bill. The main issues include the "second line of defence" against pensions mis-selling.

    Stay with us tonight as the House of Commons continues its scrutiny of the Infrastructure Bill.

  12. Vote on Labour amendment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree a government clause proposing a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

    They also agree a new clause on a "route strategy" for highways and one requiring a report from the government on the progress of a strategic highways company.

    The House divides on a Labour amendment opposing giving the government powers to appoint "one or more companies as a highway authority".

  13. 'Sufficient' controls

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ashton of Hyde argues that their are "sufficient" controls on the use of unmanned aerial vehicles and asks Lord West to withdraw his amendment.

  14. Drone laws

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour home affairs spokesman Lord Rosser withdraws the amendment.

    Peers now move to an amendment from the former chief of the defence staff, Lord West of Spithead, to create a specific offence of using an unmanned aerial vehicle or drone for terrorist activities.

    Lord West argues there is a gap in legislation for this relatively new technology.

  15. 'Safeguards'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow transport minister Richard Burden speaks in support of a Labour amendment to provide "safeguards" around the government's road investment strategy.

    The amendment would require consideration of the strategy's likely impact on local roads and local transport, including walking and cycling, as well as ports and airports.

  16. Appeal to withdraw

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman Lord Ashton of Hyde asks Labour to withdraw their amendment on the promise that the government will consider the proposals and return to the issue at report stage.

  17. Amendments on fracking

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    BBC News has rounded up the changes made to the Infrastructure Bill's measures on fracking during report stage today.

    While a bid to impose a moratorium on fracking was overwhelmingly defeated, a Labour amendment was added to the bill which would impose 13 tests to be met before shale gas extraction can take place.

    These include the completion of an environmental assessment and the need to consult residents on an individual basis.

    There were loud cheers from the Labour benches earlier when the new clause was accepted without a vote.

  18. Authority to carry amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers return to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

    First up is a Labour amendment to allow Parliament to annul authority to implement schemes set up by the home secretary, which allow air and railway carriers to check the details of passengers against Home Office databases to assess security or immigration risks.

  19. Cycling strategy

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final part of report stage consideration begins with a clause proposing a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy for England.

    "Cycling has moved up a gear as a result of this government," Transport Minister John Hayes says, to groans.

  20. Labour amendment defeated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's amendment is defeated by 330 votes to 209 - a government majority of 121.

  21. Another vote

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now voting on a Labour amendment opposing moves to transfer additional powers to the Land Registry.

    Labour want to remove parts of the Infrastructure Bill which would confer powers, including responsibility for local land charges, to the Land Registry.

  22. Pubs clause defeated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    New clause 16 is defeated by 293 votes to 245 - a majority of 48.

  23. People's Museum

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Monks comes to his main gripe. The People's Museum in Manchester is facing a £200,000 shortfall due to changes in central government funding.

    The museum, which is dedicated to the story of how working class men earned the right to vote, is now the only national museum without secure future income streams, he argues.

  24. Division on pubs clause

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs back new clause 14, extending the powers of the Greater London Authority to incur expenditure on housing or regeneration.

    The House divides to vote on new clause 16, which would make the demolition or change of use of pubs subject to planning permission.

  25. 'Support pubs'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Greg Mulholland, who chairs the All-Party Save the Pub Group, backs a proposed clause to make any proposed demolition of, or change of, use to public houses and other drinking establishments subject to planning permission.

    "If you support pubs and support democracy, vote for new clause 16," he tells MPs.

  26. 'Difficult days'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Monks says these are "difficult days for museums".

    One in ten museums are considering selling exhibits and over half have cut staff.

  27. Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to the dinner break debate on the future position of museums in regional areas, in the light of the withdrawal of national funding from 2015-16 onwards.

    Labour peer Lord Monks is leading the debate.

  28. Amendment withdrawn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord King of Bridgewater withdraws his amendment.

    In his parting comments he warns that "if this opportunity is missed" peers may have to wait another year before legislation is brought forward, putting the UK at risk.

  29. Planning Inspectorate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Nick Herbert speaks in support of a proposed new clause which would abolish the Planning Inspectorate.

    He argues it is one of the "bureaucratic bodies which we are pledged, in the main, to abolish or reduce".

    Its functions would transfer to UK government ministers in England and to Welsh ministers in Wales.

    Labour MP Nick Raynsford says the Planning Inspectorate gives "impartial advice", adding: "It would be an absurdity to do away with such a body."

  30. 'Jeopardising' powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates warns that today's amendment may "jeopardise" the government's plans to introduce new online data retention powers in the next Parliament.

    The government is waiting for a report on online data retention by the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, David Anderson, before it brings forward any new legislation.

    This means new legislation probably wont be put forward until after the next general election, Lord Bates says.

    While the minister says he is "deeply appreciative" of today's amendments - telling peers there is "undeniably a case" for the Communications Data Bill to be brought forward - he asks Lord King of Bridgewater, Lord Blair of Boughton, Lord West of Spithead, and Lord Carlile of Berriew to withdraw their amendment.

    Lord Bates
    Image caption: Lord Bates, at the despatch box, responding to the debate
  31. 'No repetition, no hesitation, no deviation'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing seems to be applying the rules of BBC Radio 4's Just a Minute as time runs short in the debate on the Infrastructure Bill.

    "We have 21 minutes left and a great many matters to discuss," she chides MPs.

    "If everybody proceeds with no repetition, no hesitation, no deviation, everyone will get in."

    Eleanor Laing
  32. Labour response

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour home affairs spokeswoman Baroness Smith of Basildon says the clauses have not been "properly discussed or debated" today.

    Labour do not consider these to be the "right amendments" she says.

    She calls on the minister to provide detailed alternative proposals to allow security services to access online communications data when he responds to the debate.

  33. More time needed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Foreign Office Minister Baroness Warsi says she is concerned that peers have not been given enough time to scrutinise these clauses.

    Describing herself as a person "who will probably be subjected to more random checks than other members" of the House of Lords, she says these powers worry her.

    National security is very hard to define, she argues, and can be interpreted to justify a "very wide and very broad" number of reasons to check citizens communications.

    Baroness Warsi
  34. Too many powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Green party Peer Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb says the police and other security services already have powers that go "far beyond what they need."

    Lee Rigby's killers and the perpetrators of the Paris massacres were already known to the security services, she tells peers. The reason they were free to commit their crimes was not due to lack of surveillance, but "a lack of good police work" she argues.

  35. Infrastructure projects

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Communities and Local Government Minister Stephen Williams indulges in some governmental self-praise on major infrastructure projects.

    "2,500 projects have been delivered during this Parliament," he says, but argues that historic "under-investment" still needs to be addressed.

    However, he rejects Labour's call for a national infrastructure commission, calling it "an unproven and untested idea".

    Stephen Williams
  36. Planning and infrastructure

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House has disposed of amendments concerning fracking and moves on to consider other aspects of the Infrastructure Bill.

    This part of report stage debate concerns planning and national infrastructure projects.

  37. Moratorium rejected

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The call for a moratorium on fracking is overwhelmingly defeated by 308 votes to 52 - a majority of 256.

  38. More debate needed

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    David Cameron's former internet advisor, Baroness Lane-Fox of Soho, stands to oppose the motion, arguing that there needs to be a more detailed debate before any decision can be made.

    The public already distrusts the government's intrusion into their personal data, she says, and any wrong decision could damage the "trust and engagement with the groups this legation is trying to reach".

    Baroness Lane-Fox
  39. At least 18 months

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The cross-party clause proposes that a moratorium would last for "a period of not less than 18 months and not more than 30 months" after the bill becomes law, while an assessment is carried out.

    MPs from Labour, the Lib Dems, the Greens and Plaid Cymru have signed the motion and the SNP has indicated it will support it.

  40. No early devolution

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Labour bid to devolve licensing to Scotland earlier has been defeated by 324 votes to 231 - a government majority of 93.

    A third division follows, on the cross-party clause calling for a moratorium on fracking and an independent assessment of the environmental impact.

  41. Do something!

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Chair of the British Joint Intelligence Committee Baroness Neville-Jones argues that the worst thing peers can do today is "do nothing".

    While she is not a fan of today's amendments, peers must vote through new powers to allow security services access to online communications data with or without the government proposing legislation, she says.

    "It is not possible to argue that in the current situation we do not face growing danger as the result of declining capability in the background of a growing threat, and it is our duty to do something about it," she argues.

  42. Scotland and fracking

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Scottish Parliament currently has power over planning issues but the Smith Commission has recommended devolution of onshore licensing and mineral access rights.

    The commission was established to examine more powers for Holyrood after voters rejected independence.

    However, those new devolved powers will not come to Scotland until after May's UK general election.

    The UK government has agreed to exclude Scotland from laws making it easier for fracking firms to drill for shale gas.

  43. Devolution vote

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now voting on a Labour clause to devolve "the licensing of onshore shale gas extraction underlying Scotland".

  44. Amendment rejected

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs reject Labour's bid to extend environmental regulations by 320 votes to 224 - a government majority of 96.

  45. Division

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree the government clause requiring occasional reports from the Committee on Climate Change on the impact of onshore petroleum extraction.

    The House divides on a Labour clause which would extend environmental regulations on "water discharge activity or groundwater activity" to cover fracking.

  46. A government bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A second former Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Lord Condon, is now speaking in the debate.

    The amendments should be dropped in favour of new proposals that the government must bring forward to "fill the gap" in the security services' powers, he argues.

    Any new powers must have "a critical mass of public support and support of communications firms" to be effective, he adds

  47. Trespass law change

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Green Party MP Caroline Lucas says "360,000 people signed a petition" opposing the change in trespass laws contained in the Infrastructure Bill.

    Putting pipes under private land would not be considered trespassing under the bill.

    She backs new clause 9 favouring a moratorium.

  48. Moratorium clause proposed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Julian Huppert moves new clause 9, which calls for a moratorium on fracking and an independent assessment.

    The motion has the support of backbench MPs from Labour, the Liberal Democrats, the Green Party and Plaid Cymru.

  49. 'Half-cocked clauses'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Conservative Chair of the Communications Data Bill Committee Lord Blencathra says his opinion on the proposed powers has not changed.

    While he agrees that the security services' powers need to be updated, he argues today's clauses contain powers that could allow the security services to intrude into the privacy of honest citizens.

    He warns peers that agreeing to these "half-cocked" clauses could "create a climate where it may not be possible to bring in a proper re-written [Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act]".

    Lord Blencathra
  50. Post update

    @AnneMcIntoshMP

    Conservative MP and chair of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee Anne McIntosh ‏tweets: Further amendments on fracking in #InfrastructureBill might be tabled in the Lords

  51. Argument for a moratorium

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Joan Walley, who chairs the Environmental Audit Committee, calls for a moratorium on fracking.

    She says it is unclear who has responsibility in certain areas and that should be made clear, "otherwise we will be dealing with liabilities long into the future".

    She argues for a better regulatory regime before "full-scale industrial extraction of shale gas" takes place.

    "I don't think people in the country will forgive us for not having the amount of time that is needed to scrutinise this in detail," she adds.

    Joan Walley
  52. Picture: Tim Yeo

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tim Yeo
    Image caption: Energy and Climate Change Committee Chairman Tim Yeo addresses MPs
  53. 'Safe technology'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Tim Yeo, who chairs the Energy and Climate Change Committee, says he differs substantially from the conclusions reached by the Environmental Audit Committee.

    "We concluded that fracking is a safe technology from which Britain could benefit substantially," he tells the House.

    The Environmental Audit Committee has urged a moratorium on fracking and SNP MP Pete Wishart intervenes to ask if Mr Yeo will back a cross-party amendment calling for such a pause.

    "A moratorium would not serve Britain's national interests," Mr Yeo tells him, instead arguing that the process should be speeded up.

  54. Outside the security services' reach

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord West asks whether peers really want "murderers, people traffickers, serious organised criminals and terrorists to be able to communicate and plot outside of the reach of our security service in a way they haven't been able to in the past.

    "The answer surely has to be no," he says.

  55. Labour clause 19

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour has tabled a new clause to the bill which would require a number of "necessary conditions" before fracking can take place.

    The conditions would include independent inspections, monitoring of sites for 12 months before fracking begins, and companies being required to contribute to "community benefit schemes".

  56. Analysis on Environmental Audit Committee report

    David Shukman

    Science editor

    This report opens up a new argument over shale gas in the UK. Until now the main focus of environmental concern has been on the risks of pollution. And any worries about noise or the potential for contaminated drinking water have essentially been local. But highlighting the climate angle gives the debate a national perspective.

    The MPs highlight the apparent contradiction of the UK being committed to massive cuts in carbon emissions under the Climate Change Act while at the same time also encouraging the search for new sources of fossil fuel.

    At the heart of this question is how gas itself is viewed. Since it is cleaner than coal, some say gas can act as a "bridge" to a low-carbon future, buying more time for renewable energy to become more efficient.

    Others argue that developing any kind of fossil fuel locks us into a high-carbon future and undermines or at least delays a switch to greener forms of power. And this comes at sensitive time: the government is preparing to take a leading role in a summit on climate change in Paris at the end of the year.

  57. Different measures

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord West of Spithead argues that the measures have been "kicked into touch" for political reasons, and the new powers being debated today are "considerably" different from the measures that received scathing criticism back in December.

    Lord West of Spithead
  58. No new powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Lord Blair of Boughton, argues that the police and security services are not asking for new powers, but instead asking for a retention of powers that they "already have had and are losing" due to the changing way communications are sent and received.

  59. Post update

    ‏@PickardJE

    Chief Political Correspondent for the Financial Times Jim Pickard tweets: U-turn by coalition: Amber Rudd (energy minister) lets slip government accepts Labour amendment forcing 13 new conditions re fracking.

  60. Avoiding criticism

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord King warns that if the UK suffers a Paris-style attack, which could have been prevented "if powers of the security agencies had been kept up to date", huge criticism of Parliament will follow.

  61. 'Bereft of confidence'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow energy minister Tom Greatrex, opening for Labour, claims that anyone watching the debate will be "even more bereft of confidence" in the government.

    He adds: "What we have seen so far is an absolute shambles."

  62. Race against time?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Having taken a lot of interventions from MPs, Amber Rudd is now racing through her speech and declining further requests to intervene.

    She is aiming to reassure MPs that safeguards would be in place and urges opposition members to withdraw amendments to the bill.

  63. 'Up to date' legislation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative former Defence Secretary Lord King of Bridgewater opens his comments by recognising that many peers may view these amendments as an "unacceptable use of parliamentary time".

    But he argues the UK is facing "a very serious situation" and the legislation "is not up to date to meet it".

    "It is the duty of Parliament to ensure that [legislation is up to date]," he adds.

  64. New powers

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment comes as the UK intelligence services seek more powers to gather and analyse data which they say is needed to thwart attacks such as those seen earlier this month in Paris.

    However the measures were emphatically rejected by a joint parliamentary committee on the Communications Data Bill .

    Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has previously stated that such measures would not be introduced "while the Liberal Democrats are in government".

  65. 'Snoopers charter'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    We now move to today's main event: an 18-page cross party amendment re-introducing the so-called "Snoopers Charter", making internet service providers log more of what people do online.

    It would also make the logged data more easily accessible to law enforcement and security services.

    The motion has been tabled by four senior peers: Lord King of Bridgewater, a Conservative former Defence Secretary; the crossbencher and former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Lord Blair of Boughton; the Labour former security minister Lord West of Spithead, and the Liberal Democrat Lord Carlile of Berriew, the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.

  66. 'Each site inspected'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Amber Rudd argues that there will be safeguards if shale gas fracking is expanded.

    She tells MPs that "each shale site will be inspected by the Health and Safety Executive".

    She adds that the Environment Agency will require companies to carry out monitoring of "methane in groundwater before hydraulic fracturing can commence".

    Amber Rudd
  67. Post update

    @Susanh12

    Susan Hulme

    BBC parliamentary correspondent

    Ban on #fracking in #national parks? Lots of confusion in the Commons over whether minister @AmberRuddMP announced something new. Or not?

  68. Devolution of fracking licences

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour has tabled an amendment to devolve powers to license fracking in Scotland to the Scottish Parliament before the next UK general election.

    Shadow energy minister Tom Greaterex calls for "those licences not to be delivered in Scotland until after the devolution has happened".

    Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards calls for similar powers for the Welsh government.

    Energy and Climate Change Minister Amber Rudd says that more devolution will come after the next UK general election, but Scotland and Wales "will continue to have substantial control" over onshore oil and gas extraction through planning processes.

  69. Post update

    ‏@AngusMacNeilMP

    SNP MP Angus B MacNeil tweets: Lab now trying to put "Scotland on hold" until they or theirTory mates maybe get round to devolving powers to Scotland #FrackingMoratorium

  70. 'Seeing the light'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Brown of Eaton-Under-Heywood withdraws his amendment but suggests he will table a similar amendment at report stage if the minister "does not see the light".

  71. 'Right and proper' power

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates argues that it is "right and proper" that the final decision on TPIM notices is made by the Home Secretary given her responsibility for counter terrorism.

  72. Post update

    ‏@julianhuppert

    Lib Dem MP Julian Huppert tweets: 12 minutes spent debating the timetable for debate. Now we have 94 minutes to debate fracking #fb

  73. What is fracking?

    "Fracking" is shorthand for hydraulic fracturing and refers to how the rock is fractured apart by the high pressure mixture. Experts also refer to a "frac job" and a "frac unit".

    The BBC's useful explains some of the background.

    fracking graphic
  74. Timetable agreed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree the timetable motion and report stage debate on the Infrastructure Bill begins.

    Minister Amber Rudd is introducing a new clause, tabled by the government, which would require an independent body, the Committee on Climate Change, to report on the climate change impact of the burning of onshore oil.

  75. Relocation orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Justice of the Supreme Court Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood tables an amendment to introduce judicial oversight for "internal relocation orders", mirroring recommendations brought forward by the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation David Anderson.

    Under the bill, the Home Secretary has the power to introduce relocation orders, which allow individuals to be forcibly moved within the UK.

    Lord Brown argues that allowing judges to have a final say on "internally exiling" citizens, would increase the legitimacy of the new TPIMs.

  76. No vote

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Chris Bryant adds his voice to calls for an extra day for debate on the bill.

    However, Richard Burden has already indicated that Labour will not divide the House and delay debate further.

  77. Post update

    @CarolineLucas

    Green MP Caroline Lucas ‏tweets: Great to see everyone at #fracking demo outside parliament today - message is loud & clear - #BintheBill

  78. Labour calls for extra day

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow transport minister Richard Burden says that two days of report stage "should not be too much to ask".

    He argues that an extra day would have enabled "proper scrutiny".

    He adds that such disagreements lead to an inevitable dilemma.

    "Do you debate the fact that you haven't got enough time to debate the bill, or do you get on with talking about it in the time available?"

  79. Post update

    ‏@AMMorrisMP

    Anne Marie Morris MP tweets: Tonight I will be supporting my Conservative colleague @nickherbertmp amendment on Community Right of Appeal on the Infrastructure Bill.

  80. Programme motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Points of order to the Speaker are over and the House moves on to consider the programme motion for the Infrastructure Bill.

    The motion sets out the timetable for today's debate.

    If MPs agree, it means consideration of report stage amendments and third reading will be completed by 22.00 GMT.

  81. Point of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David TC Davies asks the Speaker if it is in order that part of the report from the Environmental Audit Committee, which calls for a moratorium on fracking, should be released prior to the rest of the committee's conclusions.

    Labour MP Joan Walley, who chairs the committee, argues that the conclusions needed to be released early, in time for debate on the Infrastructure Bill.

    She claims that "legislation is being rushed through Parliament".

  82. Post update

    @IsabelHardman

    The Spectator's Isabel Hardman tweets: "I was beginning to feel unemployed," jokes pensions minister Steve Webb as he finally gets to answer a DWP qu.

  83. 'Unnecessary' amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Homes Office Minister Lord Bates argues the amendment is "unnecessary" as the current legislation allows TPIM subjects to meet with several counsellors already.

    Baroness Hamwee agrees to withdraw her amendment.

  84. Benefit sanctions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Esther McVey, responding to a question from fellow Conservative Jeremy Lefroy about benefit sanctions, claims: "If somebody misses an appointment and they have good cause they will not be sanctioned."

    Her response is accompanied by Labour jeers, but Ms McVey insists that people with a "good cause" for missing an appointment would amount to "50%" of those who are told they may have committed "a sanctionable offence".

  85. Changing counsellors

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are debating an amendment to allow individuals required to attend "de-radicalisation" appointments to request a change of "counsellors" if they don't get along.

    Moving the amendment, Baroness Hamwee says people "sometimes cannot rub along with others for reasons which we cannot quite identify".

    Baroness Hamwee
    Image caption: Baroness Hamwee
  86. 'Scandal of food poverty'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Kerry McCarthy tells Iain Duncan Smith: "The scandal of food bank use and food poverty in this country is his responsibility and he needs to do something about it."

    Mr Duncan Smith welcomes the work of the "voluntary sector" and claims that food poverty is not all the fault of the present government.

    "It was her government that crashed the economy and made people worse off," he adds.

  87. TPIMS amendments

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    First up a series of amendments on TPIMS (Terrorism Prevention Orders) from Lib Dem peers Baroness Hamwee, Baroness Ludford and Lord Paddick.

  88. 'A tax so bad'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Jack Dromey claims the under-occupancy penalty will be remembered alongside the poll tax.

    "Once in every generation there is a tax so bad that the next generation looks back and asks: 'Why did they do it?'

    "Such was the poll tax - now the bedroom tax."

    Iain Duncan Smith accuses Labour of "scaremongering" and reminds Mr Dromey that Labour introduced similar measures in the private rented sector.

  89. Counter-Terrorism Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to the committee stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

  90. English as a foreign language

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Davies of Stamford steps in to prevent Lord Nash from sidestepping a question on the whether the UK has enough qualified English teachers to teach children who learn English as a second language.

    Lord Nash says the government are "focussed on increasing the level of literacy in this country" but does not give a figure for the number of qualified teachers.

  91. Teaching foreign languages

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Sherbourne of Didsbury calls for a greater focus to be given to teaching foreign languages in schools, to aid "cognitive development" in children and boost the UK's trading power.

    Education Minster Lord Nash agrees. The prime minster has already pledged to "increase substantially" the number of students learning Mandarin, he adds.

  92. Picture: Iain Duncan Smith

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Iain Duncan Smith
    Image caption: Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith is answering from the despatch box
  93. Work Programme woes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Nia Griffith says job centre manager have raised "serious concerns" about the effectiveness of the government's Work Programme - a scheme to provide work experience and training to unemployed people.

    She says there have been complaints about "a lack of work placement opportunities, infrequent contact with participants and lack of explanation to participants about why sanctions have been requested".

    "The Work Programme is the most successful scheme of its kind," Work and Pension Minister Esther McVey claims.

    Labour MP Nia Griffith
    Image caption: Labour MP Nia Griffith
  94. Outside the Clyde

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Trefgarne is back on his feet again, suggesting that the new Type 26 frigates be built outside Scotland "given the uncertainty of their place [in the union]".

    The frigates are currently scheduled to be built on the Clyde in Scotland.

  95. More funds for the Navy

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Chief of the Naval Staff Lord West of Spithead lobbies the government to invest more funds in the UK's 19 destroyers and frigates to help defend the UK "in this very chaotic and dangerous world" and start buying "long lead items for" the new Type 26s.

  96. Type 26 Frigates

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Defence Spokesman Lord Astor of Hever tells peers that the government is expecting to replace all 13 Type 23 frigates with Type 26 frigates "on a one-for-one basis" but will make an announcement before the end of this Parliament.

  97. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    Editor of PoliticsHome.com Paul Waugh tweets: Fact of The Day. Employment minister Esther McVey: "More jobs were created in Yorkshire last year than in the whole of France"

  98. French health system

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Chancellor Nigel Lawson, now Lord Lawson of Blaby, says GPs in the UK are paid "substantially more" than GPs in France even though the French health system "might even be a little bit better".

    Baroness Jolly suggests this might be due to French GPs not having a good trade union body.

  99. Post update

    @LibDemLords

    Lib Dem Lords ‏tweets: Baroness @jollyjudith replies that today action plan launched to help recruit GPs for deprived area, as Gvt recongises is a serious prob

  100. GP hours

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Peer Lord Trefgarne suggests that given GPs' salaries - £105,100 per year for contracted GPs, and £56,600 for salaried GPs - "it might be reasonable to expect a little bit of work in the evenings and on Saturdays".

  101. New powers for Ofsted

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Education spokeswoman Baroness Jones of Whitchurch wants Ofsted to be given powers to inspect the management of academy chains, as happens in local councils.

    Education Minister Lord Nash says its "completely unnecessary" for Ofsted to be asked to inspect chains management.

    Baroness Jones of Whitchurch wants Ofsted
    Image caption: Baroness Jones of Whitchurch
  102. Questions to start soon

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Questions to work and pensions ministers will start shortly.

    Questions today are on topics including the under-occupancy penalty - which opponents have labelled the "bedroom tax" - benefit sanctions and the Work Programme.

  103. Oral questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The day in the House of Lords starts with the oral questions session, where peers will have a chance to grill government ministers on policy.

    Topics being raised today include:

    • giving Ofsted the powers to inspect the management of academy chains
    • average salary paid to general practitioners working within the NHS
    • orders for Type 26 Frigates - the new generation of Combat frigates - made before the General Election
    • progress in teaching foreign languages in schools.
  104. Dinner break debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    At around 19.00 GMT peers will hold a short debate on the future of museums in regional areas, led by former General Secretary of the Trades Union Congress, Lord Monks.

  105. Lords' business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Our live coverage of the House of Lords is also about to begin.

    Today's main business is the penultimate committee stage debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

    An 18-page cross-party amendment has been tabled on data-gathering and retention by the Security Services from four senior peers: Lord King of Bridgewater, a Conservative former Defence Secretary; the crossbencher and former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Lord Blair of Boughton; the Labour former security minister Lord West of Spithead, and the Liberal Democrat Lord Carlile of Berriew, the former independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.

    There are already accusations that they're effectively re-introducing the so-called "Snoopers Charter" after it was emphatically rejected by a joint parliamentary committee on the Communications Data Bill and there's bound to be quite a row when it is debated.

  106. More on today's Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The report stage of the Infrastructure Bill will provide MPs with an opportunity to amend the legislation, before the amended bill as a whole is debated in third reading.

    Once debate on the bill concludes, Conservative MP Rehman Chishti will lead an adjournment debate on UK support for Pakistan after the massacre in Peshawar.

    The debate follows reports that Pakistan is allowing teachers to carry weapons following last month's Taliban school massacre.

  107. Fracking

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Putting pipes under private land would not be considered trespassing if measures in the Infrastructure Bill become law.

    Where piping is put in under private land, the affected landowners will have a right to compensation.

    Anti-fracking campaigners are protesting at Westminster against that part of the bill. They will be handing in a petition, signed by 300,000 people, to MPs later.

    And a report from MPs on the Environmental Audit Committee has called for the drive for shale gas to be put on hold because it would lead to more reliance on fossil fuels.

  108. Welcome

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Good afternoon and welcome to our live coverage of today's business in Parliament.

    The House of Commons will begin at 14.30 GMT with questions to the Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith, and his team of ministers.

    MPs will then debate the Infrastructure Bill at report stage and third reading. The bill contains provisions on roads, energy, the land registry and other infrastructure projects.

    It also contains measures to develop the shale gas industry. Opponents of fracking are staging a protest outside Parliament ahead of the debate.