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Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Pippa Simm

All times stated are UK

  1. Democracy Day continues

    Don't forget that Democracy Day continues with an extended edition of Today in Parliament on BBC Radio 4 at 23.00 GMT.

  2. Goodnight from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers conclude the first day of committee stage on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill and adjourn for the night.

    The House of Lords will return tomorrow from 15.00 GMT, when it will consider Commons amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

    Peers will also hold a debate on a report by the Communications Committee on broadcasters and general election debates.

    The House of Commons sits from 11.30 GMT. Highlights include Prime Minister's Questions and an Opposition day debate on the NHS.

  3. Exclusion orders question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Baroness Warsi - a former Foreign Office Minister - asks about an individual who, for example, disputes allegations against them and wants to return to the UK to clear their name.

    "How long do we anticipate this person to be outside the country?" she asks.

    Baroness Warsi
  4. Temporary exclusion orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are discussing amendments relating to temporary exclusion orders, which would control the return to the UK of citizens suspected of involvement in terrorism.

    Labour peers are seeking reassurances over the "permit to return" - an order by the home secretary giving an individual who is subject to a temporary exclusion order permission to return to the UK.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates attempts to reassure peers who are concerned that UK citizens could be left stateless.

    "The passport is not something that is the same as citizenship," he says.

  5. Today in Parliament on Democracy Day

    As part of Democracy Day, Radio 4 will be broadcasting a specially extended edition of Today in Parliament from 23.00 GMT.

    There will be reports from Myanmar, Moscow, the European Parliament and the devolved institutions, as well as a full round-up of the day in Westminster.

  6. Committee stage resumes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers resume their scrutiny of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, which contains provisions about the retention of communications information, exclusion powers and security.

  7. Short break

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The short debate is over and the House takes a few minutes' break before resuming debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

  8. Government advice

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe tells peers that the government takes advice on vaccination programmes from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

    The JCVI "keeps all vaccination matters under review", the minister says.

    The decision to apply the current vaccination programme for HPV to girls only was taken following advice from the JCVI, he adds.

    Earl Howe
  9. 'Major campaign'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour spokeswoman Baroness Wheeler calls for "a major campaign" to educate people about "the major impact that HPV can have".

  10. More about HPV

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a family of viruses that affect the skin and the body's moist membranes.

    As well as causing most cervical cancers, HPV has been linked to oral tumours, which are more prevalent in men and are diagnosed most frequently in people over 60.

    The incidence of oral cancer in people under 40 is rising, due to alcohol intake and exposure to HPV.

    Experts warn that in most cases oral cancers are caused by heavy smoking and heavy drinking, not HPV.

  11. Commons finishes for the day

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After some final remarks from the minister, the day in the House of Commons comes to an end.

    Do stay with us though, as we continue to bring you live coverage of the House of Lords, where peers are currently taking part in a short debate on the human papilloma virus (HPV).

  12. TTIP 'benefits'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister George Eustice stresses the benefits of TTIP, and says it is a government priority to secure the best deal for the UK.

    He acknowledges the UK poultry industry's concerns about the deal, such as whether it places the industry at a competitive disadvantage.

    But he assures MPs that EU negotiators have "consistently stated" that the EU's food safety standards will be upheld.

  13. About HPV

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    HPV is a sexually-transmitted infection which can lead to cervical cancer in women.

    The national vaccination programme, which has been in place since 2008, applies to all girls aged 12 and 13.

    Arguing that boys should also be vaccinated, Lord Patel says HPV does not just cause cervical cancer but is responsible for "a wide range of cancers" in both women and men.

    Lord Patel of Bradford
  14. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Minister George Eustice is charged with responding to the debate on behalf of the government.

    He begins by stressing the value of the poultry industry to the UK economy.

    It supports about 73,000 jobs and contributes £3.3bn annually to GDP, he says.

  15. HPV debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The committee stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill breaks for an hour and peers are taking part in a short debate on a topic tabled by Labour peer Lord Patel of Bradford.

    Lord Patel is asking what action the government is taking to include all adolescent boys in the national vaccination programme for human papilloma virus (HPV).

  16. Caution urged

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Roger Williams, the MP for Brecon and Radnorshire, acknowledges that that TTIP could bring "huge opportunity" to the food sector but urges caution, warning that the deal should not come at the expense of food safety.

    Poultry meat production methods in the United States "are by no means equivalent to those in the United Kingdom", he tells MPs.

    "The United States industry wishes to export its products produced to standards that are not equivalent to ours into the UK market.

    "TTIP risks providing them with a vehicle to do so."

  17. What is TTIP?

    TTIP is an EU-US trade deal primarily designed to cut tariffs and regulatory barriers to trade between the US and EU countries, making it easier for companies on both sides of the Atlantic to access each other's markets.

    You can read more about it here.

  18. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Roger Williams now has the floor, to lead a short half-hour debate on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the poultry industry.

  19. Last business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    It's almost time for the adjournment debate - but not before the House whittles through its remaining orders of the day, including presentation of petitions.

  20. Motion defeated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The results are in and MPs have rejected calls for the UK's Trident nuclear weapons system not to be renewed.

    The motion - put forward by the SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Greens - was defeated by 364 votes to 35, a government majority of 329.

  21. Voting process

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Divisions in the Commons tend to take about 15 minutes.

    MPs have to queue up and give their name to a "teller" in either the "Aye" or "No" lobbies, which are situated behind the government and opposition sides of the chamber, respectively.

    The result is then read out by the tellers for the winning side, and confirmed by the Speaker.

  22. Voting time

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now voting on the motion - tabled by the SNP, Paid Cyrmu and the Greens - which calls for the Trident nuclear weapons system not to be renewed.

    The result is expected at about 19.15 GMT.

  23. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Minister Philip Dunne has the final word in the debate, as he sums up on behalf of the government.

    He dismisses estimates - cited by the motion's supporters - that the overall cost of replacing Trident would be £100bn, saying: "We do not recognise that figure."

    He puts the cost in the region of £15-20bn at 2006 prices, cited in a government white paper of that same year.

    Mr Dunne urges MPs to reject the motion.

  24. 'Best deterrence'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Green MP Caroline Lucas, who is the penultimate backbench speaker in the debate, explains that she supports the motion - which opposes Trident renewal - for moral, security, economic and legal reasons.

    She says "the "best deterrence of all" is to work with other nations "to address the global threats we face", such as people trafficking, poverty and climate change.

  25. Probing amendments

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A number of the amendments being debated today are so-called "probing" amendments.

    Probing amendments are not intended to end up as part of the bill but instead to initiate debate on a particular aspect of the legislation.

  26. Passports seized

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Over in the House of Lords, debate continues on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

    Peers are considering an amendment from a group of backbench Liberal Democrat peers concerning compensation for those who have their passports seized and who turn out not to have been involved in wrongdoing.

    "A judicial authority shall have the power to direct payment of compensation by the secretary of state to any person whose travel document is seized (whether or not retained)," the amendment reads.

  27. MP rejects 'arms race'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Anti-war campaigner and Labour MP Jeremy Corbyn says the "incredible" amount of money needed to renew Trident could be better spent elsewhere.

    The Islington North MP argues that a "secure world" is not created by an arms race but by looking at the issues that divide the world.

    "Can't we look in a different direction and deliver a different foreign policy that brings that about, rather than the arid idea that all we need to do is spend phenomenal sums of money in order to threaten to destroy the whole planet?" he asks.

    Jeremy Corbyn
  28. 'Impotent nationalism'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sedgefield MP Phil Wilson offers another Labour voice in support of the Trident nuclear weapons system - and claims the supporters of the motion "want to retreat from the world".

    Britain is a "force for good" in the world, he says, adding: "It should not be diminished by impotent nationalism which believes the best way of solving the problems of the world is by withdrawing from the world."

  29. 'No realistic alternative'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Alan Reid cautions that it would be "wrong" for Britain to go down a path of unilateral nuclear disarmament.

    The Argyll and Bute MP says there is "no realistic alternative" to the current Trident nuclear weapons system, which he describes as an "insurance policy" - and advocates the building of replacement submarines.

  30. 'Cool, calm consideration'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welcoming the debate, Crispin Blunt, the Conservative MP for Reigate, says there needs to be a "cool, calm consideration" of the merits of the weapons system.

    He says he has become "increasingly uncomfortable" with the prospect of renewing Trident - and tells MPs he will back the motion.

    It is a "political weapons system" with "very little doubtful military use", he says - asserting that it should not come at the expense of a "coherent" defence programme, and therefore should not be paid for from the defence budget.

  31. 'Complete strategic nonsense'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin berates the Liberal Democrats over their position on Trident renewal, insisting that a part-time deterrent would be "complete strategic nonsense".

    The Essex North MP claims the party is trying to use Trident as a "bargaining chip" for future coalition negotiations in the event of another hung parliament in May.

    He says Labour and the Conservatives are "quite near" making it clear to the Lib Dems that until their "stupid policy" is taken off the table there is "no conversation" to be had about any future coalition with them.

  32. Baroness Kennedy speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Kennedy of the Shaws
    Image caption: Labour peer and barrister Baroness Kennedy of the Shaws speaks in the debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.
  33. Trident cost attacked

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards - whose party has co-signed the motion against Trident renewal - takes the floor.

    He says renewal of the nuclear weapons system is estimated to cost £100bn over its lifetime, and questions how this can be justifiable when schools and hospitals are "crying out for investment".

  34. Grounds for suspicion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are considering another Labour amendment to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill, which deals with police powers of "search and seizure" at UK ports.

    The bill would empower police to search someone suspected of intending to leave the UK "for the purpose of involvement in terrorism-related activity".

    An officer would have powers of search if he or she had "reasonable grounds" for suspicion, but Labour's amendment would require "evidence or intelligence".

  35. Cost-effective way?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Our position," Vernon Coaker tells MPs, is that "it is right for the UK to maintain a credible, minimum independent nuclear deterrent based on a continuous at-sea posture."

    Pressed by Defence Minister Philip Dunne to confirm that this would require four submarines, Mr Coaker says the current evidence supports that argument.

    "But what we have said of course as part of the Strategic Defence and Security Review that we will look to see whether a continuous at-sea deterrent can be delivered in a more cost effective way."

    Vernon Coaker
  36. Labour's views

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaking on behalf of the opposition, shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker says Labour is proud to be an "internationalist multilateralist party" which is firmly working with others towards a world without nuclear weapons.

    But he says to abandon Britain's nuclear weapons system unilaterally at this stage in the disarmament process would "do more harm than good".

    "In the current climate it would make Britain less secure and would send out exactly the signals at a very sensitive moment in international relations," he tells MPs.

  37. Challenge on renewal

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP's Angus Robertson challenges Defence Secretary Michael Fallon's earlier characterisation of the party's opposition to Trident as "irresponsible".

    He claims it is an attempt to "create a phoney debate on a phoney choice" on Trident - and asserts that mainstream public opinion does not support its renewal.

  38. 'Sunset clause' withdrawn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Rosser says his party backs powers to temporarily seize passports in the current security situation, but that situation may change.

    That is why Labour supports a "sunset clause" allowing the power to lapse after two years and be renewed if Parliament chooses to do so, he argues.

    However, he withdraws his party's amendment.

    Amendments are rarely pushed to a vote in committee stage in the Lords under parliamentary convention, though peers may reintroduce amendments at report stage.

  39. What are the threats?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rory Stewart, Conservative MP and Defence Select Committee chair, tells MPs he will vote in favour of retention of the Trident nuclear deterrent - but says he has "enormous respect" for those MPs who have "anxieties" about it.

    While the threats facing the UK are not the same as during the Cold War, he says, he cautions that "we don't known what [Russian President Vladimir] Putin is doing" - raising the prospect of a Russian nuclear attack on a Baltic state.

    Mr Stewart says Putin's decisions on warfare will be guided by his perception of what "we, the US or Britain are likely to do in response" - arguing that deterrence depends on whether the "other side" believes the UK would use its nuclear weapons.

    "Which is why there is absolutely no point us having a discussion about a nuclear deterrent without looking at our defence strategy and posture in general," he adds.

    Investing in "fancy bits of kit" will be "meaningless" unless people believe the UK is prepared to use them.

  40. Labour amendment

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The bill includes measures on the retention of communications information, exclusion powers and security.

    Peers are debating amendments relating to the power to temporarily seize passports from terror suspects.

    Labour has proposed giving Parliament the chance to debate and vote on the continuation of that power after two years.

  41. At-sea patrols called for

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Woodcock mocks the of idea of an "Ikea-deterrent" - after the previous speaker, Lib Dem Sir Nick Harvey, suggested the way forward was for the component parts of a nuclear weapons system to be kept and assembled if needed.

    Mr Woodcock says a part-time deterrent is "no real deterrent at all" - and argues that continuous at-sea patrols are necessary to deter a nuclear attack on the UK.

  42. Post update

    @BaronessEB

    Baroness Berridge tweets: Lord Alton defends the right not to believe in case of #RaifBadawi @andrewcopson @FreedomDeclared @UKHouseofLords

  43. Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The main business in the Lords gets under way.

    Peers are considering proposed amendments to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

  44. 'Out of space dimension'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Minister Philip Dunne, a Conservative, intervenes to say Sir Nick's remarks are taking Lib Dem policy into "a new out of body, out of mind, out of space dimension".

    Seeking further clarity on the MP's position, he presses him to say whether he will be voting for or against the motion.

    Sir Nick continues his speech but does not directly reply to the question.

    Defence Minister Philip Dunne
  45. Punishment condemned

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Blogger and activist Raif Badawi, who founded the now-closed online forum Liberal Saudi Network, was due to receive 50 lashes in public after Friday prayers last week. However, the flogging was postponed on medical grounds.

    Last May Mr Badawi was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for "insulting Islam" and disobedience.

    Baroness Falkner argues that he was sentenced for expressing "innocuous sentiments" including support for secularism.

    "As a Muslim, I don't recognise [these] offences as being against Islam," she adds.

  46. Last question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth and final question today is from another Liberal Democrat, Baroness Falkner of Margravine.

    She asks what discussions ministers have had with the government of Saudi Arabia regarding freedom of speech in the light of the sentence passed on Raif Badawi.

  47. Situation 'unsustainable'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe says the rising liabilities have been caused by a number of factors including more patients being treated and an increase in litigation,

    Lord Sharkey says the Medical Defence Union thinks the current situation is "unsustainable" and has called for a change in the law.

    Lord Sharkey
    Image caption: Lord Sharkey puts a question to the health minister
  48. What justification?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Sir Nick Harvey, a former armed forces minister, questions the justification for spending what he predicts will be more than £100bn on replacing Trident.

    He says there has been "round after round" of cuts to the Armed Forces, with the prospect of further cuts to come, and yet "for some reason" nuclear deterrent gets "an automatic bye" and is "beyond debate".

    The Devon North MP advocates an end to patrols, but says the component parts of a nuclear deterrent should be retained "for the time being" - along with a highly skilled workforce that is capable of putting them together if necessary.

  49. Third question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Question number three comes from Liberal Democrat peer Lord Sharkey, who asks what has caused a £3.1bn increase in the National Health Service's potential liabilities for clinical negligence.

    The NHS's potential liabilities rose to £25.7bn over the financial year 2013-14.

  50. Second question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hunt of Kings Heath, the shadow deputy leader of the Lords, asks the second question, which is on reviewing the governance of the House of Lords in the light of the report of the House of Commons Governance Committee.

    The committee's first report set out its recommendations in December.

    It recommended giving the House of Commons Commission statutory responsibility to oversee the provision of services to the House, its members and the public.

  51. Progress 8

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Progress 8 charts the progress a pupil makes from the end of primary school to the end of key stage 4 (KS4).

    The Progress 8 measure aims to encourage schools to offer a broad KS4 curriculum, and reward schools for the teaching of all their pupils.

    The new curriculum will cover eight subjects including English, mathematics, three other English Baccalaureate (EBacc) subjects chosen from sciences, computer science, geography, history and languages; and three other subjects, from a range of EBacc subjects, or another approved arts, academic, or vocational qualification.

    Baroness Kidron says there is a "real concern" that arts subjects have been "downgraded" in the new measurement of performance.

  52. Vote later

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Roger Godsiff, the Labour MP for Birmingham Hall Green, argues in favour of modernising and maintaining the conventional Armed Forces - to ensure they have the proper equipment - rather than for the "mythology" of an independent nuclear deterrent.

    He tells MPs he will be voting against the motion later. The vote is expected to take place at 19.00 GMT.

  53. Lords questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions in the Lords are about to start.

    Crossbench peer Baroness Kidron has tabled the first question, asking what is being done to ensure that arts subjects have equal weighting in the new Progress 8 measure.

    The new measure of the performance of schools in England will be introduced in 2016.

  54. Trident systems

    As MPs continue their debate on Britain's nuclear deterrent, read more about the Trident weapons systems here.

  55. Economic importance

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Oliver Colvile warns of the "devastating impact" that scrapping any of the nuclear submarines would have on his Plymouth Sutton and Devonport constituency.

    He says Devonport dockyard - which refits and refuels Trident submarines - is a "vital part" of the local economy.

  56. Lords to meet shortly

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The day in the House of Lords will begin shortly with questions to ministers.

    The main business is the first day of detailed, committee stage debate on the Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill. The bill is the seventh major counter-terror law to be introduced in the UK since 9/11.

    During the dinner break at around 19.30 GMT, Labour peer Lord Patel of Bradford will lead a short debate on including all adolescent boys in the national vaccination programme for human papilloma virus.

    Infection by human papilloma virus (HPV) can lead to cervical cancer and a national vaccination programme has been in place for girls aged 12 and 13 since 2008.

  57. Disarmament

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    It's time for backbench contributions now, beginning with the Labour MP for Lewisham Deptford, Dame Joan Ruddock.

    She argues that "real security" lies in nuclear disarmament.

    She chaired CND for four years from 1981.

    Dame Joan Ruddock
  58. Need 'no less now'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Concluding his remarks, the defence secretary urges MPs to vote against the motion opposing Trident renewal.

    He says: "We are in an age of uncertainty and confrontation. History teaches us that the defence of this country means being ready for the unexpected.

    "That means a full-time nuclear deterrent, not one that clocks off for weeks or months at a time, or one that somehow patrols pointlessly."

    He adds: "The need for the nuclear deterrent is no less now than it has ever been."

  59. Labour's stance?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Michael Fallon claims Labour leader Ed Miliband has shifted his position on Trident - from supporting a continuous at-sea nuclear deterrent to the "least cost deterrent that we can have".

    The defence secretary surmises it is because the SNP had said it would not do a political deal with any party which supported nuclear weapons.

    He challenges the shadow front bench to say whether Labour would be prepared "to trade our national security if that was the price of power?"

    Shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker responds by saying Labour is committed to a "minimum independent credible deterrent based on continuous at-sea deterrent".

  60. Damage to UK?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon goes on to attack the SNP's opposition to Trident renewal as "highly irresponsible".

    "It would sacrifice the security of the UK on a wrong-headed notion that opposes nuclear in all its form and on the basis of cost savings which would be miniscule compared to the impact on our national security, the damage to our economy, jobs and the submarine building industry," he says.

    Michael Fallon
  61. What's the cost?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon tells MPs it would cost an estimated £25bn to replace the four Trident submarines, which would be spread over 25 years.

    To put this in context, he says, it compares to the £14.8bn cost of Crossrail, and £27bn cost of Crossrail 2.

  62. Deterrence

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "A nuclear deterrent is the only assured way to deter a nuclear threat," the defence secretary tells MPs.

    He counsels that there is "no alternative" to a continuous at-sea nuclear weapons system which could provide "the same level of deterrent".

    Four submarines are required to maintain a continuous posture, he adds.

    He says every government that has looked at the threat of a nuclear attack has decided to renew Britain's continuous nuclear deterrent.

  63. Post update

    @MorayMP

    SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson ‏tweets: Defence Secretary can't answer simple direct question of Trident replacement including through-life costs? #shocking

  64. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "We cannot gamble with our country's national security," Defence Secretary Michael Fallon tells MPs, as he stresses the government's commitment to maintaining a continuous and effective minimum nuclear deterrent.

    He says Russia is modernising its nuclear forces, while North Korea has carried out three nuclear tests and "threatened" a fourth.

    Iran's nuclear programme also remains a "real concern", he tells MPs.

  65. What do the other parties think?

    David Cameron has always maintained the UK needs to keep its nuclear weapons, calling it as "insurance policy" against attacks. Trident replacement was a Conservative manifesto pledge in the 2010 general election.

    However, the Lib Dems oppose a like-for-like replacement and insisted on a value for money review as part of its terms of entering into coalition with the Tories.

    Labour supports Trident renewal, saying it has been a "cornerstone" of peace and security for nearly 50 years - although a number of MPs on the left of the party have historically opposed it.

  66. Replacement

    Trident is a sea-based nuclear weapons system. It was acquired by the Thatcher government in the early 1980s as a replacement for the Polaris missile system which the UK had possessed since the 1960s.

    Trident then came into use in the 1990s.

  67. Decision time

    Decisions on a replacement for the UK's Trident nuclear weapons, based on the Clyde, are expected to be made in the next parliament.

  68. Opposition to Trident

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angus Robertson
    Image caption: Mr Robertson sets out his party's opposition to the Trident nuclear weapons system
  69. Interventions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Several MPs are making interventions in Mr Robertson's speech to provide counter-arguments in support of Trident.

    The Conservatives' Julian Lewis argues that a nuclear deterrent is vital to prevent war "by showing someone they cannot attack you with these weapons without suffering similar retaliations".

  70. Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now engaged in a debate on Britain's Trident nuclear deterrent. It is being led by the SNP's Westminster leader Angus Robertson.

    The motion - co-signed by Plaid Cymru, the Greens and Labour MP Jeremy Corbyn - states that Trident should not be renewed.

    "The time has come to put down a marker about scrapping Trident and not replacing these weapons of mass destruction," Mr Robertson tells MPs.

  71. Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Introducing his bill, Mark Garnier warns of "significant anomalies" in supermarkets' pricing in rural areas.

    He says drivers should not have to pay a rural premium on their petrol.

    His bill, he explains, would give the Competition and Markets Authority reserve powers to intervene when "price anomalies cannot easily be explained by pricing factors".

    It receives an unopposed first reading and is scheduled for its next debate on 6 March 2015.

    However, it stands little chance of becoming law due to lack of parliamentary time.

    Conservative MP Mark Garnier
  72. Fuel prices

    The average price of petrol in the UK has dropped to around £1.10 a litre - the lowest level since January 2010.

    For diesel, it is now below £1.20 a litre.

    But how much it costs to fill up can vary from street to street and town to town. Use the BBC's fuel price calculator to see how what you pay compares with the national average and what people are paying in other countries.

    Fuel nozzle

    Last week, the European Commissionapproved the rollout of rural fuel rebates to 17 areas in Scotland and England.

    The scheme allows retailers to claim back up to 5p per litre duty relief on unleaded petrol and diesel, and pass on the savings to customers.

    The 17 areas include parts of the Highlands, Argyll and Bute, Northumberland, Cumbria, Devon and North Yorkshire.

    The European Union has still to approve the introductions of the scheme.

  73. Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Garnier, the Conservative MP for Wyre Forest, takes the floor to present his bill Road Fuel Pricing (Equalisation) Bill.

    He wants to ensure that big fuel retailers - mostly supermarkets - do not squeeze motorists in rural areas by charging more in areas where there is less competition.

  74. Point of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A final question from Lib Dem MP Duncan Hames brings Foreign Office questions to a close. Time for points of order.

    Conservative Sir Edward Leigh notes the 750th anniversary of Parliament today, as he praises a debate held earlier this morning in Westminster Hall to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

    Speaker John Bercow endorses his comments, as he says "the pervasive threat of anti-semitism" in parts of the world is a significant problem in the UK as well.

  75. Egypt relationship

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Roger Williams asks the government what it is doing to develop the UK's economic relationship with Egypt.

    Foreign Office minister Tobias Ellwood tells MPs he led a trade mission of 51 companies to Egypt last week - the largest, he said, in 15 years.

    He adds that it is right to deepen the trade and investment partnership with the country.

  76. Punishment 'deplorable'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander raises the case of Saudi liberal blogger Raif Badawi, who has been sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes in Saudi Arabia.

    Philip Hammond, the foreign secretary, says the UK government "deplores" the punishment, and the use of corporal punishment in Saudi Arabia and elsewhere.

    He says the government has raised it with the Saudi authorities "at the highest level", and informs MPs he will be raising the matter with the deputy foreign minister of Saudi Arabia when he visits London on Thursday.

  77. Ukraine concerns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The first topical question comes from the Conservative MP for Colne Valley, Jason McCartney, who raises concerns about the situation in Ukraine.

    Foreign Office Minister David Lidington says the UK will continue to defend the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine.

  78. Topical questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker John Bercow signals to MPs that the session has moved on to topical questions, of which ministers have no advance notice.

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond begins with a short statement on his departmental responsibilities.

  79. Ebola crisis

    You can find out more about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa here.

    A medical worker checks the temperature of a young girl at Bata airport, in Bata, Equatorial Guinea
    Image caption: A medical worker checks the temperature of a young girl at Bata airport, in Bata, Equatorial Guinea
  80. Ebola rate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to a question on Ebola in Sierra Leone, Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond tells MPs that the number of cases and rate of infection is decreasing.

    He says the UK "remains fully committed" to providing the resources and leadership needed to eradicate the disease.

  81. Support for Jordan and Lebanon?

    House of Commons

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    Foreign Office minister Tobias Ellwood is fielding questions on Syrian refugees.

    Shadow foreign secretary Douglas Alexander praises the role of Jordan and Lebanon in receiving "a huge population" of refugees who are fleeing the war torn country.

    He asks what the UK is doing to support Jordan to "maintain stability" in the country, noting that a "significant number" of refugees are with host populations, rather than in camps.

    The minister, Tobias Ellwood, tells him that funding is being provided to Jordanian towns.

  82. Access to US?

    House of Commons

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    A question on TTIP now, the EU-US trade deal.

    Conservative Neil Carmichael urges the government to do more to promote the "economic and trade advantages" of TTIP, lamenting the "misinformation verging on conspiracy theory" emerging on the impact of any deal.

    Foreign Office Minister David Lidington tells MPs TTIP would benefit the average British family by about £400 a year by offering a greater choice of products at lower prices.

    It would also give small businesses "much better access" to "300 millions" US consumers.

  83. Libya's security

    House of Commons

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    In response to a question on the political and security situation in Libya, Foreign Office minister Tobias Ellwood tells MPs Britain is working with the UN to resolve the "crisis", warning that failure to find a resolution could open the door to insurgent groups, such as Islamic State.

    Conservative MP John Baron says the current situation in Libya proves there is "a deficit of analysis" at the centre of he UK's foreign policy making process.

  84. Busy benches

    House of Commons

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    House of Commons wideshot
    Image caption: There's a good turnout in the Commons for the departmental question session
  85. Benefit claims

    House of Commons

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    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond restates the Conservative Party's wish to end child benefit being paid to children who do not live in the UK.

    Philip Hammond
  86. Post update

    @lucywake

    Lucy Wake ‏tweets: Good to see @AnnClwyd raise concerns about human rights in Turkey in @foreignoffice questions

  87. Free movement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After questioning from Conservative MP Nigel Mills, Philip Hammond stresses that abuse of free movement must be addressed by the European Union. He says it is a problem that affects not only the UK.

  88. EU reform?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond tells MPs he has visited 18 EU member states to discuss European Union reform, most recently Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia last week.

    He adds that the European Council agreed in June that EU reform is necessary, and that the UK's concerns should be addressed.

  89. 'Reliable ally'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP and chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee chair Sir Richard Ottaway opines that Turkey needs to become "a more reliable ally".

    He says the country should make available its air bases for anti-Islamic State coalition aircraft, and control its border with Syria "more tightly than it is doing so the moment".

  90. Journalists imprisoned

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ann Clwyd, the Labour MP for Cynon Valley, raises concerns about the "repression and imprisonment" of journalists in Turkey.

    David Lidington assures the MP that ministers regularly raise human rights matters with the Turkish government, and will continue to do so.

  91. Turkey's position

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And they're off. Foreign Office minister David Lidington responds to the first question, on the department's policy on Turkey's accession to the European Union.

  92. Hats Off Strangers!

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Speaker's procession takes place every sitting day in the House of Commons. The Serjeant at Arms, carrying the Mace, and a doorkeeper walk ahead of the Speaker, while some members of the Speaker's staff - his chaplain, secretary and a trainbearer - follow behind.

    As the procession reaches the central lobby of the Houses of Parliament, one of the policemen on duty shouts: "Hats Off Strangers!"

    Then, policemen in helmets and any members of the public wearing hats are required to remove their headgear as the procession passes.

  93. Speaker's procession

    House of Commons

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    With just a few minutes to go until business in the House of Commons gets underway, the Speaker's procession - from his residence to the chamber - is about to take place. Unusually, you can watch it live - on BBC Parliament.

  94. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welsh Liberal Democrat Roger Williams will close the day with an adjournment debate on the US-EU trade deal - known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP for short.

    The Brecon and Radnorshire MP will raise concerns about the potential implications of the deal on the poultry industry.

  95. Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The main debate of the day is on Britain's Trident nuclear deterrent.

    The motion has been tabled by nationalist parties Plaid Cymru and the SNP, and states that sea-based nuclear weapons should not be renewed. It is also supported by the Green Party.

    Trident nuclear submarine
  96. No urgent questions or statements

    House of Commons

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    There are no urgent questions or ministerial statements today, which means Foreign Office questions will be followed by the ten minute rule motion.

    Conservative MP Mark Garnier will introduce a bill which aims to ensure that big fuel retailers do not charge more in areas of the country with less competition.

  97. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to our live coverage of Tuesday in Westminster.

    The House of Commons kicks off at 11.30am, with questions to Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond and his team of ministers.