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Summary

  1. The day began at 09.30 GMT with questions to the transport ministerial team, including topical questions.
  2. MPs heard the Business Statement, which is a chance for Leader of the House William Hague to set out forthcoming business.
  3. Pensions Minister Steve Webb announced the new welfare uprating rate
  4. MPs approved a financial resolution for the purposes of the Provisional Collection of Taxes Act 1968: in other words, the stamp duty changes announced in the Autumn Statement.
  5. MPs passed a motion calling for an independent inquiry into the failings in the FCA redress scheme
  6. MPs also debated changing the pricing scheme for branded medicines to allow a greater number to be used in the NHS.
  7. The adjournment debate was on late night anti-social behaviour in south Manchester.
  8. Peers began the day slightly later at 11.00 GMT with oral questions.
  9. The first of the day's three debates was on supporting business following the Autumn Statement.
  10. Two more debates followed: on the governance of sport and on the procedures of the House.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's the end of today's business in the House of Lords.

    Tomorrow peers will take part in a debate led by the Archbishop of Canterbury, on the "role of soft power and non-military options in conflict prevention", from 10.00 GMT. See you then.

  2. 'Stunning self-discipline'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Leader of the House Baroness Stowell closes the debate on the procedures of the House of Lords.

    She says BBC Parliament correspondent Mark D'Arcy tweeted that peers showed "stunning self-discipline" during the debate on Iraq on 26 September in finishing on time, which showed the Lords' "self-regulation in action".

    She claims the House has a "less political, less rowdy, less combative approach" which marks it out as different to the Commons.

    Mark D'Arcy did indeed tweet on 26 September: "Winding-up speeches starting in Lords - Labour's @FightBach then @jrwallace54 - with stunning self discipline, peers will finish on time".

  3. Post update

    @LabourRoyall

    The Lords' Labour leader Janet Royall tweets: Great to hear excellent speech by @SteveTheQuip - Chief Whips are usually seen or felt and not heard.

  4. 'Rarely heard'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bassam of Brighton, Labour chief whip in the Lords, sums up for the opposition in the procedures of the House debate.

    He says it is a rare privilege to speak in a debate.

    "Chief whips are usually only seen or felt. Rarely are they heard," he jokes.

  5. House rises

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that's it. Damian Hinds brings the adjournment debate to a close, ending today's business in the House of Commons.

    MPs will be back tomorrow at 09.30 GMT for another session of private members' bills.

    Stay with us this evening though, as peers debate one of their favourite subjects: the procedures of the House of Lords.

  6. Dispersal powers

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Government minister Damian Hinds says he will look at all suggestions to make dealing with anti-social behaviour more effective as anti-social behaviour "can prevent the law-abiding majority from enjoying public space" if left unchecked.

    However he tells MPs that local councils and police forces already have a great deal of power to deal with anti-social behaviour and minor crimes - including newly introduced "dispersal powers" to instantly ban groups from an area for up to 48 hours.

  7. 'Bullying males'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Lipsey attacks "forces of conservatism" in the House and says question time is characterised by "bullying males".

    He adds: "I won't come into question time, and I've had 16 years of it."

    But Crossbench peer Baroness Deech claims to have studied the matter and says there are "proportionately more interventions by women" at question time.

    "They are not shouted down and you ought not to worry," she tells Lord Lipsey.

    Baroness Deech
  8. Fund to combat 24 hour party people

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    To combat this, Mr Leech calls on council licensing authorities to cause "as much hassle" as possible to people who are throwing organised tickets parties in the student household.

    Greater accommodation for third and second year students must be built on campus to draw students away from residential family areas, Mr Leech says; and suggests that any developer wanting to build such accommodation should pay a levy to fund a 24 hour anti-social help line for nearby residents.

  9. Noise and disruption

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Leech tells MPs that parts of his constituency have had a huge influx of students due to its proximity to Manchester University. This has led to "studentification" leading to a number of problems including noise and disruption form late-night parties.

    While assuring MPs that he does not believe students are responsible for the majority of anti-social and nuisance behaviour in the area, he says the situation is now getting worse and many residents are now "at the end of their tether".

  10. Final item of business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to today's final business in the House of Commons - the adjournment debate - today led by Liberal Democrat MP for Manchester Withington, John Leech, on late night anti-social behaviour in south Manchester.

  11. Review pending

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Life Sciences Minister George Freeman, responding to the debate for the government, says he agrees with the overall message that price should reflect the value of new medicines - and believes this should apply to medical technologies as well.

    Mr Lansley's view will form part of a review into regulatory framework of NICE's mechanisms, Mr Freeman says.

  12. 'Yet another committee'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former leader of the House Lord Strathclyde defends some of the procedures in the chamber, arguing that there are ways for backbenchers such as Lord Foulkes to have their say under current arrangements.

    "I am not in favour of yet another committee," the Conservative peer adds.

  13. Membership of the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The UK Parliament website lists 788 members of the House of Lords.

    This puts it a long way behind China's National People's Congress, which is made up of 3,000 delegates elected by China's provinces, autonomous regions, municipalities and the armed forces.

    However, the National People's Congress meets in full for only one session each year.

  14. Blacklisted

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrew Lansley wants National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to develop a new "value based pricing regulation" to allow doctors to hand out the branded drugs to those who need them, ending current postcode prescribing.

    At the moment, certain expensive branded medications are 'blacklisted' in the by Clinical Commissioning Groups, preventing doctors from prescribing them.

  15. Lords procedures criticised

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    "This is the second-largest legislative assembly in the world after the People's Congress in China," Lord Foulkes says, and goes on to criticise the "self-regulating" nature of the chamber.

    The opportunity to raise points of order "should not be left to the leadership and loudmouths like me", he argues.

    He calls for the Lords to have an equivalent of the Commons' backbench business committee to increase backbenchers' control over debates in the chamber.

    Lord Foulkes of Cumnock
  16. Procedures of the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move to their final debate of the day.

    Labour peer Lord Foulkes of Cumnock is opening this debate on "the procedures and practices governing the arrangement of business in the House of Lords".

    Lord Foulkes tabled this debate to ask the government if it has any plans to reform these procedures.

  17. New medicine

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During the first few years a new medicine becomes available it is usually marketed as a brand name as companies take out patents - which means only one company can produce the medicine for a certain length of time - on each new drug to ensure they regain the money spent on its development and make a profit.

    In the UK, the standard patent lasts 20 years, although this can sometimes be extended by up to another five years.

    Once the drug patent protection expires, other companies can produce their own version of the medicine which can be up to 80% cheaper because there are fewer research and development costs.

  18. Sport governing bodies

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government Culture, Media and Sport spokesman Lord Gardiner of Kimble says that Sport England invests in national governing bodies of sport and emphasises those bodies being run in a transparent manner.

    "Sports are becoming better governed and better able to understand their fans," he argues.

    The 46 national governing bodies represent sports which see more than 75,000 people in England participate once a week.

  19. Further backbench debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now taking part in a backbench business debate on availability and pricing of branded medicines on the NHS led by former health secretary Andrew Lansley.

  20. Motion supported

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs unanimously agree to support the motion calling the government to consider appointing an independent inquiry to explore failings in the FCA's redress scheme.

    However, this doesn't mean we'll soon be reading about a new inquiry into the FCA, as the decision is not binding on the government, but it is quite likely to guide discussion in the future.

  21. MPs complaints

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During the debate, several MPs complained about the limit on the amount of money the FCA could demand from banks and the fact that the FCA could not force a bank to pay the full amount owed.

    However, Andrea Leadsom says the current limits have been agreed upon as they ensure most complaints can be addressed quickly while those involving large sums of money should be dealt with by the courts.

  22. 'Criminality'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour culture, media and sport spokesman Lord Stevenson of Balmacara, speaking in the debate on the governance of sport, says: "We need to think about large-scale and serious criminality, both and off the field."

    He also urges more though about ways to fund "grassroots sport".

  23. Confidentiality clauses

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Addressing the issue of secrecy in the redress process, Andrea Leadsom says confidentiality clauses in agreements between participating banks and the FCA needed to allow the FCA to carry out their reviews prohibit information from being released.

    However, she assures MPs she will write to the FCA to see if more information can be released.

  24. Frontbench response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrea Leadsom
    Image caption: Economic Secretary Andrea Leadsom responds to the debate for the government
  25. Progress made

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding for the government, Economic Secretary Andrea Leadsom says that while there is a "cohort of people" who have yet to be treated justly, progress has been made in the redress scheme.

    Around 17,000 small and medium sized enterprises have taken part in the scheme and 14,000 cash offers have been made, with over £1.5bn being paid out.

  26. Cultural change in FCA called for

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Drawing her remarks to a close, Cathy Jamieson she says what is really needed is "cultural change" in the FCA. An appeals system is needed for the FCA recompense scheme, she says, and calls on the government to review the compensation levels.

  27. History of problems

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Treasury minister Cathy Jamieson is now responding to the debate for Labour. She tells MPs that many of her constituents have been affected by the mis-selling of complex interest rate derivatives.

    But she reminds MPs of the reasons behind the establishment of the Financial Conduct Authority, which was set up after risky trading by banks led to the collapse of Northern Rock, Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds, who all had to be bailed out by the taxpayer.

  28. Baroness Brady's first speech

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Baroness Brady is making her maiden speech in the Lords.

    Football executive Karren Brady, who has appeared alongside Lord Sugar in the Apprentice, tells peers of the reaction to her appointment as the managing director of Birmingham City at the age of 23.

    She says: "I was banned from boardrooms, I was ridiculed as a publicity stunt, I was displayed in the media as everything from a ball-breaker to a bimbo - and all because I was a woman, and a young woman at that."

    Baroness Brady
  29. World Cup bids

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In recent months the FA and Fifa have faced criticism over the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups.

    Last month, a summary of the report into the bidding process was released and caused controversy by criticising all bids for ethical violations except the two winning bids, from Russia and Qatar.

    England's bid was accused of "improper" conduct in attempting to win support from committee member Jack Warner.

    The FA said that it would not accept "any criticism regarding the integrity of England's bid".

  30. Crisis of confidence

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Mark Williams - who was one of the key MPs pushing for today's motion - says there is a crisis of confidence in the banking industry, and while there is mystery in the FCA's recompense process there always be mistrust, he says.

  31. 'Vested interests'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Triesman, a former chairman of the Football Association, delivers some stinging criticisms of the body he helped to run.

    He says the FA's "board is unrepresentative - it's dominated by vested interests".

    These vested interests include the "overwhelming economic power" of the Premier League, he adds.

    However, he has even stronger words for international body Fifa, accusing it of "systematic corruption".

    Lord Triesman
  32. Support for the motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Marcus Jones says the issue is about fairness: the "fair redress for the loss people have suffered". Things can only be fair if the FCA can put people affected by the mis-selling "back in the position they were in before they were sold these products", he says.

    Marcus Jones
    Image caption: Conservative MP Marcus Jones lends is support to the motion
  33. Pensions and benefit statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Full text of Pensions Minister Steve Webb's announcement on pensions and benefit uprating has now been published by Hansard and can be found here.

  34. Sport debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move on their second debate of the day, which is on the governance of sport, both nationally and internationally.

    Conservative peer Lord Moynihan, who has served as a minister for sport and chairman of the British Olympic Association, is opening the debate.

    He says that international sport bodies, the "international federations" such as Fifa, have taken sport outside "the sovereignty of parliaments".

  35. 'Lean on' FCA

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Solicitor General Sir Edward Garnier lends his support to the motion, which he says will increase the transparency "and therefore the accountability" of the banks for what they're doing.

    He says its time for the Treasury to start "leaning on" the Financial Conduct Authority, which, he says, is not living up to its responsibility and concealing the facts of the interest rate swap derivative.

  36. More on the Autumn Statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In his Autumn Statement yesterday, George Osborne said the UK is the fastest growing economy out of the G7 industrialised nations.

    The government now predicts economic growth of 3% for 2014, up from the 2.7% predicted in March.

    The government says that 500,000 new jobs have been created this year, 85% of which have been full time.

    But shadow chancellor Ed Balls said George Osborne would continue to miss his deficit targets "year after year".

    SNP deputy leader Stewart Hosie said that the Chancellor is "running out of time to redeem himself" after the "pain" of his policies.

  37. 'Programme of efficiency'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister Lord Deighton, closing the Autumn Statement debate for the government, tells peers that ministers "will continue with our programme of efficiency" in the public sector.

    This will, he adds, include "efficiency in the welfare budget".

    Lord Deighton
  38. 'Onslaught on welfare'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow Treasury spokesman Lord Davies of Oldham is summing up for Labour in the Autumn Statement debate.

    He says the price for the government's failure to eliminate the deficit will be paid in welfare cuts.

    "We know how addicted Conservative Chancellors, in particular, are to an onslaught on welfare," he adds.

    Lord Davies of Oldham
  39. Post update

    @CommonsHansard

    Hansard tweets: The Official Report of #Transport questions is available at Commons Hansard

  40. Post update

    @GuyOppermanMP

    Conservative MP Guy Opperman ‏tweets: In Commons debating Bully Banks & FCA redress scheme - a campaign led by robust Welsh Conservative MP @GutoBebb

  41. Why the redress scheme?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The FCA's redress scheme was adopted as a result of the mis-selling of complex interest rate derivatives to small and medium-sized enterprises.

    The motion asks the government to consider appointing an independent inquiry to explore failings in the scheme.

  42. Good and bad news

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Opening the debate, Conservative MP Guto Bebb says the fact that this is the third debate is both and a "good and a bad thing" because it shows MPs are still taking an interest in the problem - but it also show that hundreds of victims have not be dealt with "fairly or adequately" by the current redress scheme overseen by the Financial Conduct Authority.

  43. Compensation concerns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to the first of today's backbench business debates on the Financial Conduct Authority Redress Scheme - led by Conservatives Guto Bebb and Mark Garnier, and Lib Dem Mark Williams.

    This will be the third backbench debate on this subject and has been called because of continuing concerns about the voluntary scheme to compensate people in 40,000 cases of mis-selling of interest rate swap derivative products - £3bn has been paid by the banks so far.

  44. Motion agreed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs unanimously agree to the motion which allows a bill to be brought forward to permanently enact the government's reform. A new Stamp Duty Reform Bill is now expected to be introduced next week.

  45. UKIP view

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UKIP MP Mark Reckless says the Treasury deserves credit for this "overdue but incredibly important" reform, but questions some of the government's numbers.

    He says he's not impressed with the "three men and a dog" approach the OBR have taken to the figures on these proposals. These reforms will have a far more positive affect on the economy than the OBR's assessment, he says.

    Dismissing claims that houses prices may fall in his Rochester and Strood constituency due to aversion to UKIP, he says that the OBR's estimate that transactions would rise by 1.1% is likely to be exceeded in most constituencies thanks to this "sensible supply side reform".

  46. Post update

    ‏@nigelfletcher

    Nigel Fletcher tweets: @jameschappers @ayestotheright Awkward. The Stamp Duty policy is now technically a Lib Dem proposal, having been moved by @stevewebb1

  47. It's not just any maiden speech...

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Rose of Monewden is making his maiden speech in the House of Lords during the debate on the Autumn Statement.

    Stuart Rose is a former chairman of Marks and Spencer and a director of online grocer Ocado.

    Lord Rose of Monewden
  48. 'Stonehenge problem'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Baroness Bottomley of Nettlestone, a former environment minister, says that she and others in government have "tried to solve the Stonehenge problem" but the current government has succeeded.

    Ahead of the Autumn Statement, the government announced that a tunnel is to be dug to take a congested main road past Stonehenge.

    The 1.8-mile (2.9km) tunnel is part of a £2bn plan to make the A303 a dual carriageway.

    Baroness Bottomley praises Lord Deighton, the Commercial Secretary to the Treasury, saying he has an ability to "get things done".

    Baroness Bottomley of Nettlestone
  49. Labour's commitment to mansion tax

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    These stamp duty reforms show that the government now recognise that "high value properties are under taxed" Shabana Mahmood says, and to this end Labour still want to see a mansion tax introduced to raise funds for the NHS.

  50. Labour support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Treasury minister Shabana Mahmood indicates that Labour will support the changes - she tells MPs Labour supports any measure "deigned to alleviate the burden on house buyers" - though asks for further detail what the government thinks the impact of the change will be on a fragile housing market.

  51. Catching his breath

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Gauke
    Image caption: David Gauke sets out the government's arguments for stamp duty reform flanked by his government colleagues (Steve Webb and Iain Duncan Smith) who were forced to move the motion on his behalf.
  52. 'Enormous' cuts

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Wrigglesworth warns that "the forecast cuts in expenditure, which are to come in the next Parliament, are really quite enormous".

    Cuts on that scale could cause "major difficulties" for some government departments, he claims.

    He calls the Autumn Statement a "fingers-crossed statement", in that he hopes economic growth will reduce the need for major cuts.

  53. Stamp duty

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Yesterday George Osborne announced stamp duty will be cut for 98% of homebuyers during his Autumn Statement .

    At midnight last night the previous system, where the amount owed jumps at certain price levels, was replaced by a graduated rate, working in a similar way to income tax.

    The new stamp duty rates at different band levels will only apply to the part of the property price that falls within that band, so there will no longer be a huge jump in stamp duty, for instance, on a property costing £500,001.

    Under the new rules, no tax will be paid on the first £125,000 of a property, followed by 2% on the portion up to £250,000, 5% on the portion between £250,000 and £925,000, 10% on the next bit up to £1.5 million and 12% on everything over that.

    The Treasury said someone buying a property at the average family home price of £275,000 would save £4,500, while a £2.1m purchase would carry £18,750 more stamp duty compared with the old system.

    The change is estimated to cost the Treasury around £800m in lost revenue.

  54. 'Skills shortage'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Treasury spokesman Lord Adonis, opening for the opposition in the Autumn Statement debate, says there is a "skills shortage" in the UK.

    He claims that ministers "parade big figures for the growth in apprenticeships, but this is mainly older employees" but numbers in their teens and early twenties "have barely risen".

    Until this is addressed, there will be a continuing skills shortage and concerns about immigration, he argues.

  55. Phew....

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister David Gauke finally makes it into the chamber to move the motion for the government. The speaker agrees to rewind proceedings and a slightly out of breath Mr Gauke begins the debate as normal - well, almost normal.

  56. Debate? What debate?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Strange scenes in the House of Commons There is some confusion as the minster due to table the motion to approve the government's new stamp duty reforms, announced in yesterday's Autumn Statement, is missing.

    Several MPs filibuster to allow a Treasury minister to turn up. Questions are asked as to whether the minister will be allowed to join in the debate despite the fact he was not here at the start - MPs are not normally called unless they are present at the start of important debates.

    Despite no Treasury minister being present - despite MPs' best efforts - Speaker John Bercow gets the debate under way. He calls the situation "an irregular state of affairs" and says "this sort of thing is to be deprecated".

  57. Empty benches

    House of Commons
    Image caption: MPs complain about the poor turnout for what they say is "a very important statement".
  58. 'Good news' statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Phillip Hollobone says there was so much "good news" in the statement that he struggled to get it all down, and asks Pensions Minister Steve Webb to confirm his previous figure - which he is only too happy to do.

  59. 'Paltry' increases

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow pensions minister Gregg McClymont declares that "those depending on help to make ends meet" will not be grateful for the paltry increases made today.

    He criticises Steve Webb for failing to properly highlight the 1% increase to working age benefits.

    Today's "paltry" increases are due to the government's "economic failure" leading to an increased need for borrowing and leaving less public money to be spent on welfare, he says.

  60. 'Fastest-growing economy'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions in the Lords are over and peers turn their attention to yesterday's Autumn Statement.

    Viscount Younger of Leckie, a Conservative peer and former business minister, opens the debate.

    He welcomes the measures set out by Chancellor George Osborne, saying the UK has reached "record" employment levels and is "the fastest-growing economy in the G7".

  61. A Tory invitation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Farrington of Ribbleton tells the House that Westminster Conservative Party has obtained her contact details.

    "I've been invited to join the Conservative Party!" she exclaims, to laughter.

    She adds that "they are wasting a lot of money" in trying to recruit her.

    Lord Bates, a Conservative, jokes: "We are never without hope!"

    Baroness Farrington of Ribbleton
  62. Rates of increase

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Benefits received by disabled people and pensioners increase with the Consumer Prices Index (CPI), while working-age benefits increase by 1%.

    The government has a "triple guarantee" for uprating the basic state pension, which means the state pension is increased by whichever is highest of earnings, prices or 2.5%.

    In February, MPs were told the basic state pension will increase by 2.7% this year, to £113.10 a week, as CPI inflation at 2.7% was the highest of the three benchmarks.

    The Pension Credit standard minimum guarantee is required to be increased at least in line with earnings.

  63. Phone scamming question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth and final question asks the government what action it is taking to deal with fraud associated with phone scammers.

    The question comes from Labour peer Lord Kennedy of Southwark, who says that he received a phone call recently to tell him that he had won £50,000 in a competition that he claims he did not enter.

    "I'm still waiting for the cheque, my Lords!" he says.

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates jokes: "I apologise on behalf of the government."

  64. Pension uprating

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Pensions Minister Steve Webb is now making a statement to announce the uprating rate of tax benefits and pensions.

    He tells MPs that the basic state pension will increase by 2.3% in 2015 - roughly equivalent to £115 a week - which he says means the basic state pension will be at its highest level for over two decades.

  65. 'Order!'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    As a "self-regulating" House, the Lords sometimes finds itself embroiled in arguments about whose turn it is to ask the next question.

    Leader of the House Baroness Stowell stands up to restore order.

    Baroness Stowell
  66. Fire-fighter debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow deputy leader of the house Thomas Docherty finds an unlikely ally in Conservative MP Peter Bone, who asks why money resolutions for private members' bills have not been granted, before requesting a debate on fire-fighters so that he can "give thanks to the fire men and women of Northamptonshire that do such a great job" and praise the government's record on fire-fighters.

    William Hague says that if such a debate is granted, he looks forward to hearing from Mr Bone.

  67. Legal aid question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The third question is from Labour peer Lord Howarth of Newport, on whether the government plans to reconsider its policies for legal aid.

    He asks what is being done to the ensure that "no parent, facing proceedings for the removal of a child, is prevented through lack of resources" from obtaining legal advice.

  68. European Arrest Warrant

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Under the Lisbon Treaty, the UK and Ireland have case-by-case opt-outs over justice matters.

    Last month, the UK government faced a backbench rebellion in the Commons over plans to opt in to the European Arrest Warrant.

    Conservative peer Lord Forsyth asks why, instead of opting into the warrant, the UK did not have a bilateral agreement with the EU.

    But Labour peer Lord Richard argues that "the process would be longer, it would be more difficult" under a bilateral arrangement.

  69. Calls for poverty debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Kevin Brennan requests a debate on poverty. He says that GDP per head in the poorest UK regions is lower than many European countries, and that nine out of 10 of the poorest regions in Europe are in the UK.

    Leader of the House William Hague refuses to comment on whether a debate will be granted. Instead, he points to record levels of employment in the UK. The only way to address poverty, he says, is to make sure there's a strong economy and growing finances.

  70. Lisbon Treaty question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Dykes asks the second question, on discussions with the government of the Republic of Ireland on the UK's justice opt-outs under the Lisbon Treaty.

  71. Calls for road safety debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Mark Pawsey asks for a debate to consider measures to improve road safety around school gates, over concerns that parents are putting children's lives in danger by overly congesting areas around schools during the school run.

    William Hague says local authorities have a statutory duty to keep school areas safe and have powers to enact new restrictive measures. He suggests that Mr Pawsey continues discussion with councils.

  72. Freed on bail

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Ghoncheh Ghavami was later freed on bail because of health problems, according to her family.

    The 25-year-old was part of a group of women arrested after trying to watch the volleyball match on 20 June.

    Iran banned women from men's volleyball games in 2012, extending a long-standing ban on football matches.

    The Iranian authorities have argued that women need protection from the lewd behaviour of male fans.

  73. Questions begin

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions in the Lords begin, as Conservative peer Lord Moynihan asks about Ghoncheh Ghavami, a joint British and Iranian citizen who was jailed for a year after attending a men-only International Volleyball Federation World League match in Iran.

  74. A matter of time

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Barry Sheerman asks why the government won't make time for a debate on food running out for Syrian refugees and the Ebola crisis in West Africa, when there is "so little [other] business".

    William Hague says there have been several debates and regular statements on both subjects, and that the government doesn't have time for general debates. He advises Mr Sheerman to apply to the backbench business committee to request some of the debate time they control.

  75. Coming up

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords gets under way in the next few minutes with questions to the government.

    Then, peers will have a further opportunity to debate yesterday's Autumn Statement by the Chancellor.

    Two more debates follow: on the governance of sport and on the procedures of the House of Lords itself.

  76. Requests for debates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now requesting time for debates in the House of Commons on subjects they feel are important.

  77. 'Not aware of problems'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague dismisses claims that the government is quietly killing bills it doesn't like, saying he is "not aware of any problems" with money resolutions. Turning to Clive Efford's NHS Bill, he says there are several private members' bills that come above it in the pecking order.

    Mr Hague says Labour have only asked for a debate on fire-fighter pensions in the last 24 hours. He says the he will look at providing a debate, but points out that there have been three opportunities for Labour to table the debate during an opposition day slot since the regulations were changed on the 28 October.

    He adds that Lord Hutton had found that fire-fighter pensions were the most expensive public sector pension scheme and has to be "reformed to be sustainable".

    The government support debating a new role for e-petitions, he says, but will have to wait until the report is published to make a decision.

  78. Money resolutions

    House of Commons

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    Shadow deputy leader of the house Thomas Docherty accuses the government of preventing inconvenient bills progressing by denying them money resolutions - which set out the public cost of a bill - for bills it "doesn't like".

    He challenges Mr Hague to commit to giving Labour MP Clive Efford's National Health Service (Amended Duties and Powers) Bill - which would scrap much of the government's planned reorganisation of the NHS - a money resolution before Christmas.

    He also calls for a debate on fire-fighter pensions, which he says have been "seriously mismanaged", to allow MPs to debate the regulations.

    He also sets out the case for debates on reports from the procedure committee on a greater role for e-petitions, and a second reading for the Armed Forces Bill, which Labour would like to see.

  79. Business statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Moving seamlessly into the business statement, William Hague is now setting out the timetable of future business for debate in the House of Commons, during his weekly business statement.

  80. English laws

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to a question from Conservative MP Geoffrey Clifton-Brown, Leader of the House William Hague says the government will publish a paper on the options of "English plans and English Laws" before Christmas, and is expecting a statement in the next few weeks.

  81. Breach of ministerial code?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Nic Dakin accuses the chancellor of breaching the ministerial code by trailing most of the announcements of the autumn statement in the newspapers.

    Leader of the House William Hague says much of the Autumn Statement was a complete surprise, and therefore did not contravene the code.

  82. Administration questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to questions on the administration and services of the House of Commons. However, it gets off to a faltering start as Conservative MP Stephen Mosley asks about Speaker's Commission on Digital Democracy.

    House of commons Commissioner John Thurso tells MPs that the speaker's commission is not his responsibility, but that he's sure the concerns will be addressed as the man in charge - Speaker John Bercow - is currently presiding over the debate.

  83. Compensation deals

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP and former Welsh secretary Cheryl Gillan accuses HS2 officials of trying to "beat home owners down" on compensation for properties affected by the new rail line. She says it is "shaming" that the government has not settled the matter after five years, and calls on the government to "sort this shambles out".

    Transport Minister Robert Goodwill says the "need to sell scheme" for compulsory purchase - which allows property owners to ask the government to purchase their home for its full un-blighted market value - will begin operating in the new year.

  84. 'Short term solution'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow transport secretary Michael Dugher calls for the East Coast mainline rail route's transfer from public ownership to private hands - after a joint venture between Stagecoach and Virgin won the franchise to run the rail line - to be halted.

    He tells MPs that in public ownership "the East Coast mainline achieved the top customer satisfaction for a long distance rail operator", and returned over £1bn to the exchequer.

    Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin says the new joint venture will bring more services and better facilities to the rail line, and public ownership was only ever a "short term solution".

  85. A new Pennine way?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Clive Betts asks for a tunnel to be built through the Pennines in order to ease congestion on roads in the area.

    Transport Minister John Hayes says he appreciates the concerns and will look at proposals as part of the government's "Northern Powerhouse" plans.

  86. Calls for tag system recognition

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Michael Fabricant kicks off the day's business, asking the government to be proactive in encouraging operators of toll roads, bridges and tunnels to recognise each other's tag systems - allowing quick passage through barriers. Mr Fabricant says it is "madness" that there isn't already a communal system.

    Transport Minster John Hayes says proactive is his "second name" and says he is happy to discuss the idea with Mr Fabricant.

  87. Oral questions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    But before all that MPs start the day at 9.30 GMT with two quick oral questions sessions.

    The first to Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin and his ministerial team. Debate is expected to focus on improving road safety, East Coast mainline services and European negotiations on port regulation.

    The House of Commons Commissioner, John Thurso, and William Hague will answer questions about changes to the Commons procedure and administration, including the maintenance of the Palace of Westminster and the rest of the Parliamentary Estate.

  88. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Adjournment debate - the day's final business - will come at around 17.00 GMT and is led by Liberal Democrat MP for Manchester Withington, John Leech, on late night anti-social behaviour in south Manchester.

  89. Week ahead

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons Leader William Hague will announce the forthcoming business to MPs in his weekly business statement at 11.30 GMT.

    The session will also give MPs the opportunity to request statements or debates on matters which they feel merit parliamentary attention.

  90. Back bench business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There will be two debates on subjects chosen by the Backbench Business Committee.

    The first is on the Financial Conduct Authority Redress Scheme - led by Conservatives Guto Bebb and Mark Garnier, and Lib Dem Mark Williams. This will be the third backbench debate on this subject and it's been called because of continuing concerns about the voluntary scheme to compensate people in 40,000 cases of mis-selling of interest rate swap derivative products - £3bn has been paid by the banks so far.

    That's followed by a debate on the availability and pricing of branded medicines on the NHS led by the former Health Secretary Andrew Lansley, and Lib Dem Julian Huppert.

  91. Welfare statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There is a statement on pension and benefit uprating from Pensions Minister Steve Webb at 10.30 GMT.

    In March 2013 the government passed the Welfare Benefits Uprating Act, which introduced a below inflation 1% cap on many working-age benefits and tax credits.

    In his Autumn Statement yesterday George Osborne announced plans to freeze Universal Credit work allowances for a second year and cut tax credits when overpayments are certain.

    Labour oppose the plans and have indicated they would raise working-age benefits and tax credits in line with inflation.

  92. Good Morning!

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to today's rolling coverage of the day's events in Parliament as they happen.

    Today's main business is a motion to approve plans to reform stamp duty, announced by George Osborne in yesterdays' Autumn Statement.

    The stamp duty changes were introduced at midnight last night to prevent any cooling of the housing market caused by buyers holding back their payments and waiting to take advantage of the tax reduction, Mr Osborne said. Today's motion will give parliament a chance to analyse the detail, and formally approve or reject Mr Osborne's plans.