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Summary

  1. MPs sat from 11.30 GMT, and the day began with questions to the Wales Office team.
  2. The prime minister answered questions from the leader of the Opposition, Ed Miliband, and backbench MPs in the weekly PMQs session at noon.
  3. Chancellor George Osborne delivered his Autumn Statement - setting out the state of the economy and new announcements on tax and spending
  4. DUP MP Jim Shannon presented a ten minute rule bill on audio announcements in buses.
  5. The Commons then turned its attention to the Taxation of Pensions Bill at report stage and third reading.
  6. Finally, Labour MP Toby Perkins led the adjournment debate on the effect of changes in annual pension allowance on workers transferred out of public sector pension schemes.
  7. Peers sat at 15.00 GMT and the day began with oral questions.
  8. The Lords then considered the Modern Slavery Bill in a committee of the whole House.
  9. The final, short debate was on improving the health of lesbian, bisexual and trans women.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodnight from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's the end of business in the Lords for today.

    Peers will return tomorrow from 11.00 GMT to debate topics including the Chancellor's Autumn Statement and supporting businesses in the UK.

  2. NHS constitution

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe tells peers that the NHS constitution "commits the NHS to a comprehensive service available to all" regardless of gender, sexuality or gender reassignment.

    The health service "must respect their human rights", he says.

    However, he concedes that "some discrimination does take place".

  3. Transgender discrimination condemned

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour spokeswoman Baroness Gould condemns discrimination against transgender people.

    An NHS survey in 2007 found that 34% of transgender people had considered suicide.

    Transgender people are more likely than the general population to suffer from depression and self-harm.

  4. Stonewall survey

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A survey for gay rights group Stonewall found that less than half of lesbian and bisexual women have been checked for sexually-transmitted infections.

    The same survey found that half of those surveyed had been infected with an STI.

    According to Stonewall it is often wrongly assumed that STIs cannot be spread between women.

    The survey also found that less than half of lesbian or bisexual women were "out" to their GP.

  5. Access to healthcare

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Cashman says access to healthcare defines "the kind of society in which we live" and calls on health and social services to cater for minorities.

    Lord Cashman
  6. Health of women

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Barker says the debate is solely about women.

    "We're not turning our back on our gay brothers but we ask them today: please don't rain on our parade," she says.

    Baroness Barker
  7. Final debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers move on to their final business for today: a short debate on improving the health of lesbian, bisexual and trans women.

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Barker is leading the debate, and opens by recalling a day when "the ladies abseiled in from the gallery" to protest against section 28.

    Protesters got into the chamber and disrupted proceedings in 1988.

    She adds that gay and lesbian peers can now take their place alongside everyone else, with no abseiling required.

  8. 'A rocket'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says the government envisages the anti-slavery commissioner as a person who could "put a rocket" under local authorities and law enforcement.

  9. Goodnight from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And they're off. After a busy day, the House of Commons is done for the day.

    MPs will be back tomorrow at 9.30 GMT, when the main business will be a motion to approve the government's plans to reform stamp duty, announced in today's Autumn Statement.

    Stay with us as the House of Lords continues its committee stage scrutiny of the Modern Slavery Bill.

  10. 'Truly independent'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Making rapid progress through their second day of committee stage, peers have reached the final group of amendments to be debated today.

    The Modern Slavery Bill would establish an anti-slavery commissioner.

    Baroness Royall, the Labour leader in the Lords, introduces amendments which, she claims, would make the commissioner "truly independent" rather than "a creature of the Home Office".

    Baroness Royall of Blaisdon
  11. Government response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Economic Secretary Andrea Leadsom is responding in the debate for the government.

    She says she is sympathetic to the particular issues Mr Perkins has raised, but cannot comment on them.

    Instead, she sets out the government's rules on annual allowances for registered pension schemes - which can be found here.

  12. Amendment 'unnecessary'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Garden says future legislation will remove the limit on fines.

    She argues that this means Labour's bid to remove a £5000 limit on fines in the Modern Slavery Bill is unnecessary.

    Baroness Garden of Frognal
  13. Adjournment debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Toby Perkins begins the last item of today's business in the House of Commons, the adjournment debate - today on pension allowances for people transferred out of public sector schemes.

    Mr Perkins tells MPs that changes to the way many former public sector companies - such as the Royal Mail - are run has led to many employees having had their pensions transferred out of public sector schemes.

    He adds that changes to lump-sum pension allowances introduced in the 2013 budget have had an unintended and "catastrophic" impact on the pension pots of his constituents - which he says has led to gross unfairness towards workers transferred out of public schemes.

  14. Call to remove fines limit

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour home affairs spokesman Lord Rosser is introducing an amendment to remove the limit on fines that can be levied for breaking the terms of a slavery and trafficking prevention order.

    The bill would empower magistrates to sentence those who break the terms of an order "to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or a fine not exceeding £5,000, or both".

    Labour does not see why fines should be limited, Lord Rosser argues.

  15. Bill moves to the Lords

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs give the Taxation of Pensions Bill its third reading, giving their backing to the government's flagship pensions reform to allow those aged 55 or over to access, or "draw down", their defined contribution pension savings in whatever form that they wish, without having to purchase an annuity.

    The bill will now pass to the House of Lords for further consideration.

  16. Third reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs unanimously agree to the government's amendments, and quickly move to the third reading - the bill's final stage in the House of Commons.

    Review at this stage is limited to the contents of the bill, with no possibility to add more amendments.

    On uncontroversial bills such as this - Labour have announced their intention to support the bill - third reading debates tend to be quiet valedictory affairs in which those most closely involved with the bill, usually the front benches, look back on the bill's progress through the House.

  17. Trafficking prevention orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are considering amendments 37 and 38, which concern the Modern Slavery Bill's proposed slavery and trafficking prevention orders.

    The bill would introduce slavery and trafficking prevention orders and slavery and trafficking risk orders - two new civil orders to enable the courts to place restrictions on those convicted of modern slavery offences, or those involved in such offences but not yet convicted.

  18. Amendment defeated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Labour amendment falls by 292 votes to 209, a government majority of 83.

    MPs now move to a series of technical amendments tabled by the government.

  19. Division

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Votes typically tend to take about 15 minutes in the House of Commons, as MPs file through the 'Aye' or 'No' lobbies to register their vote.

    There must be four 'tellers' who count the votes during a division and then announce the result to the Speaker on the floor of the House. Tellers for the ayes today (i.e. in support of the motion) are Labour MPs Tom Blenkinsop and Nic Dakin, while tellers for the noes are government whips Therese Coffey and Harriett Baldwin.

  20. What's that you say?

    Eleanor Laing
    Image caption: Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing struggles to hear voters in a near empty House of Commons chamber. With encouragement however MPs from both sides speak up and a division is called.
  21. Government case

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Financial Secretary David Gauke
    Image caption: Financial Secretary David Gauke is responding to the debate for the government.
  22. More on the Modern Slavery Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In addition to amendment 34 allowing victims of slavery to bring a civil case against the offender, peers are considering two other amendments in the current group for debate.

    Amendment 35 would allow victims to bring a civil case in a county court to recover their lost earnings.

    Amendment 36 would allow courts to award damages to victims for personal injury, loss or damage.

  23. Amendments 'unnecessary'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for the government, David Gauke says today the government has published estimates of the impact of the policy as a whole, making Labour's amendments unnecessary.

    He adds that policy changes announced in today's Autumn Statement will mean that notional income rules for assessing accessibility to means-tested benefits will be more generous for pensioners.

  24. Labour amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are currently debating a series of Labour-tabled amendments that will require the Treasury to publish a series of reports on the impact of this bill.

    Shadow Treasury minister Cathy Jamieson says the government hasn't shown any evidence of the benefit of these reforms. The pension industry has complained there is lack of clarity over what is expected of companies offering retirement products to people, she says.

    These amendments will force the government to respond to some of these concerns.

  25. Modern Slavery Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions on the Autumn Statement are over and peers turn their attention to the Modern Slavery Bill.

    The bill aims to provide law enforcement agencies with better tools to stamp out modern slavery in England and Wales.

    This is the second day of committee stage, which puts a bill through detailed examination and scrutiny.

    Crossbencher Baroness Young of Hornsey opens debate on amendment 34, which would allow victims of slavery to bring a civil case against the offender, after criminal proceedings conclude.

  26. Analysis

    Nick Robinson

    Political editor

    The BBC's political editor looks at George Osborne's Autumn Statement:

    In all but name this was a pre-election Budget.

    From his first to his last sentence - from boasting about Britain's growth to unveiling the Coalition's version of the mansion tax - Chancellor George Osborne delivered his Autumn Statement with not just one eye but both fixed firmly on polling day.

  27. Calculating...

    Find out if you're better off under the new stamp duty changes with this handy new tool from HMRC.

  28. 'A bunch of arsonists'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Forsyth attacks Labour, and former minister Lord Myners, over their comments on the coalition's record on the deficit.

    Lord Forsyth likens them to "a bunch of arsonists complaining that it is taking longer and longer to put out the fire".

  29. Background reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    For those of you looking for a little background reading on the UK's economic situation, the Commons Library have published a paper on the UK's economic indicators as at December 2014, following the Autumn Statement.

    The report found:

    • GDP grew by an estimated 0.7% in Q3 2014, following growth of 0.9% in Q2
    • the Consumer Price Index measured annual inflation rate was 1.3% in October 2014, below the Bank of England's target of 2.0% for the tenth successive month.
    • the unemployment rate had shrunk to 6.0% in July-September 2014. There were 1.96 million people aged 16 and over unemployed.
  30. 'Greater prosperity'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Non-aligned peer Lord Myners, who was a Treasury minister in the last Labour government, tells the House he wants to "congratulate" the government for missing its deficit reduction target.

    This has enabled the economy to grow, he claims, and "allowed greater prosperity, eventually, to reach a broader section of society".

  31. Government response

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Treasury Minister Lord Deighton answers peers' questions on the Autumn Statement.

    Lord Deighton
  32. 'Record of failure'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's attack on the government's record concentrates on claims of falling living standards, a failure to eliminate the deficit and a failure to cut net migration.

    Lord Deighton retorts that it was Labour in government that had "a clear record of failure".

    He argues: "We have restored this country's fiscal credibility."

    On the deficit, he jokes: "I fully accept that we are not as effective in reducing it as our predecessors were in increasing it."

  33. What's this bill about?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During this year's budget, Chancellor George Osborne promised a series of changes to the pension system. Under existing rules, someone over the age of 55 can take 25% of their pension savings as a tax free lump sum.

    This proposal would mean they could dip into pension pots as they wanted - and 25% of money taken from the pension pot would be tax free; the rest of the cash would be taxed normally.

    Research shows that 200,000 people plan to cash out their pensions. The Chancellor also removed the need for someone to use their pensions to buy an annuity.

  34. Tax receipts down

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour Treasury spokesman Lord Davies of Oldham draws attention to a fall in projected tax receipts.

    Tax receipts up to 2017-18 are forecast to be £23bn lower than predicted.

    He says "a great deal of revenue has been lost" because many working people are in fact receiving in-work benefits rather than paying taxes.

    "We are not improving in productivity," he adds.

    Lord Davies of Oldham
  35. Peers respond to Autumn Statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now have their chance to question the Commercial Secretary to the Treasury, Lord Deighton, on the measures announced by Chancellor George Osborne in his Autumn Statement to MPs earlier.

    BBC News has produced a round-up of the key points.

  36. Taxation of Pensions Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have now moved on to today's legislation - they are debating the Taxation of Pensions Bill at report stage.

  37. Winterbourne View report

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The fourth and final question to the government asks what is being done to address the care of people with a learning disability whose behaviour challenges services.

    Crossbencher Baroness Hollins has tabled the question, following the report: Winterbourne View - Time for Change.

    The report was prompted by the scandal of cruelty to disabled people living at the Winterbourne View care home.

    It called for better provision of care closer to people's friends and family.

  38. Public protection sentences

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Lloyd of Berwick asks the third question, on the continued detention of prisoners detained under imprisonment for public protection sentences.

  39. Ten minute rule bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Now DUP MP Jim Shannon is introducing his Buses (Audio Announcements) Bill. It would make the provision of audio announcements on public buses a requirement.

    UK charity Guide Dogs for the Blind says that buses play a vital role in enabling disabled people, and that audio announcements enable blind and partially-sighted people to travel with confidence.

  40. PCCs defended

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates defends the role of Police and Crime Commissioners and claims that more people are taking part in elections.

    The first PCCs were elected in 2012 in contests that attracted criticism over low voter turnout.

  41. New business tomorrow

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Leader of the House William Hague is now at the despatch box making a business statement. Business tomorrow will now include a debate to approve the new reforms to stamp duty.

  42. Welcomes student measures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Julian Huppert says he welcomes the announcements on income contingent post graduate loans, as it will reduce a barrier to social mobility.

    George Osborne says he is happy the project gets support for the MP for Cambridge - i.e. Mr Huppert.

  43. 'Politics and policing'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Imbert, a former Metropolitan Police commissioner, tells the House that "it cannot be right, or indeed safe, to introduce the evils of party politics to policing".

    He argues that "politics and policing should be worlds apart".

    Lord Imbert
  44. And the answer is...

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    ...responding to that (apparently "quite good") question from Conservative MP Bill Wiggin, George Osborne says the reason that stamp duty changes will be introduced at midnight tonight is that it wouldn't stop transaction in the housing market as people waited to take advantage of the tax advantage.

  45. Post update

    @RebeccaKeating

    Rebecca Keating

    BBC News

    Bercow rules Bill Wiggin left chamber so can't quiz @George_Osborne but changes his mind when told 'it's quite a good question' #AS2014

  46. Police and Crime Commissioners

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The second question today asks the government for its assessment of the success or failure of Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

    Crossbench peer Lord Imbert tabled the question to ask how PCCs compare "to the cost, democratic accountability and competence of the Police Authorities they replaced".

  47. Hull included?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Diana Johnson accuses the chancellor of leaving Hull out of the Northern Powerhouse - which her constituents think is an new electrical store, she says. He can make amends by announcing the privately-financed initiative to electrify the railway line in Hull, she says.

    The government is looking at improving rail services in Hull, which he says didn't happen under Labour. Hull should be part of the Northern Powerhouse, the Chancellor says.

  48. Jobs and wages

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Scottish Labour MP Gemma Doyle asks for an apology. Long term youth unemployment in her West Dunbartonshire constituency has "rocketed by 625%" under the government, while wages and living standards have been driven down, she says.

    George Osborne says the Scottish Chancellor under the last government - i.e. Gordon Brown - gave this country its highest budget deficit in its peacetime history, and left government with high unemployment. This government has turned this around and the fastest job creation at the moment is in Scotland, he says.

  49. Allotments

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Questions are under way in the Lords.

    Conservative peer Baroness Sharples opens the session with a question on what steps the government is taking to encourage local authorities to provide more allotments.

  50. Post update

    @MichaelPDeacon

    The Telegraph's sketchwriter Michael Deacon tweets: An £18,760 increase in stamp duty on houses over £2m. You might almost call it a mansion tax

  51. Drawing to a close yet?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne is into the final straight now and we're getting into the small print of the Autumn Statement. MPs are now mostly asking about details of proposed infrastructure spending - mostly to see where money can be found for projects in their constituencies.

    Following the debate, at 15.00 GMT, Leader of the House William Hague will make a brief business statement, followed by a ten minute rule bill from DUP MP Jim Shannon.

  52. Police services

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Senior Labour MP Jack Dromey says the government has broken another promise to protect front line police services. Around 8,000 police officers have gone from the front line, He quotes the Association of Chief Police Officers, who says that government plans will lead to 16,000 more job losses, "the majority" of which will be from the front line.

    He asks if the Chancellor thinks that is right.

    George Osborne says crime is falling, which shows "you can improve police services while making savings in the Home Office budget".

    Mr Dromey's question reveals Labour's "default position", he says. While Ed Balls may claim he will be fiscally responsible Labour MPs complain about spending cuts. The Labour party are "unreformed and unreconstructed", he finishes.

  53. Post update

    Laura Kuenssberg

    BBC Newsnight

    Biggest headline prob changes to stamp duty - 800 m tax cut for homebuyers - anyone think there might be an election on the way?

  54. House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    While MPs continue questioning the Chancellor on his Autumn Statement, peers will be beginning their day in a few minutes' time.

    After questions to ministers, peers will put their questions on the Autumn Statement to Treasury Minister Lord Deighton.

    The main legislative business will be the second day of committee stage debate on the Modern Slavery Bill.

    There will also be a short debate on improving the health of lesbian, bisexual and trans women, led by Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Barker.

  55. Has the election already started?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Despite his voice sounding increasingly hoarse after two hours on his feet, George Osborne is still managing to keep one eye on the May general election.

    Responding to a question from Conservative MP Ben Gummer he tells MPs that infrastructure projects announced today would be under threat under a Labour government and would almost certainly never happen in the future.

  56. Want to know more?

    Andrew Neil

    Presenter, The Daily Politics

    The headlines of George Osborne's Autumn Statement are explained by Andrew Neil in a six minute video guide. Watch it here: .

  57. Read it in full...

    The full text of the Autumn statement is now available on the Treasury website.

  58. Northern Ireland contribution

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    DUP financial spokesman Sammy Wilson says he welcomes he additional resources coming to the Northern Ireland and the commitment to devolve corporation tax to Northern Ireland.

    He asks if the assurances that George Osborne said the Treasury will need before devolving these powers include the Northern Ireland executive demonstrating that it can make progress on key issues like welfare reform.

    George Osborne says that he doesn't want to go into the detail but he admits that one of the challenges Northern Ireland faces with is that there is a "hole in its budget" due to not implementing welfare reforms. There are no credible proposals on the table from Northern Ireland parties at the moment, he says.

  59. DUP contribution

    Sammy Wilson
    Image caption: Sammy Wilson is the first member to speak for the DUP and welcomes the proposed devolution of corporation tax to the Northern Ireland executive
  60. Welsh worries

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Chris Bryant says that the Chancellor should come to his Rhondda constituency to see a food bank in the former local Conservative Party office.

    The vast majority of people using it are in work, due to the "bedroom tax", zero-hours and the government's sanctions regime. Why weren't these problems dealt with in the Autumn Statement? he asks.

    George Osborne says that the intervention shows that Labour is not committed to fiscal discipline and opposes welfare changes that bring public expenditure under control. The government's difficult decisions on welfare mean that the government is able to re-invest in infrastructure that will help the people of Wales, he says.

  61. Post update

    @MartinSLewis

    MoneySavingExpert(.com) Martin Lewis tweets: To those asking me "how do I apply for an air duty refund" - we're compiling an airline by airline list. Just give us a bit of time

  62. At a glance

    Our colleagues have produced this brilliant point-by-point outline of the .

    It's a useful run-through of every headline announced by Chancellor George Osborne today.

  63. UKIP contribution

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UKIP MP Mark Reckless asks why the government is borrowing more than struggling European economies such as Italy, Spain and Greece if the economy is doing "as well as the chancellor says".

    Mr Osborne says that is because the government started with a 10.5% budget deficit. The IMF says the UK has had the longest decline in the headline and structural deficit out of any nation, which shows "we're restoring economic stability to this country" he says.

  64. Analysis

    Robin Brant

    Political correspondent

    The BBC's Robin Brant has this analysis on the Autumn Statement:

    "There was no smile on his face as he walked to his car at the Treasury. A sombre look. The economy is growing, unemployment is falling, inflation is low, but the message is this: these are still tough times.

    One word explains why - debt. Borrowing is up - more this year than was predicted - and the deficit is nowhere near being dealt with. In spite of the chancellor's hopes back in 2010, the job's not done."

  65. Post update

    @timesredbox

    The Times's Red Box ‏tweets: Most people do not care about autumn statements, writes @Dannythefink. But the economy matters

  66. Stamp duty request

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Long time anti-HS2 campaigner and former Welsh Secretary Cheryl Gillan ties the announcement back to HS2.

    She says that she has been campaigning for reform of the compensation payments for compulsory land purchases for land owners affected by infrastructure projects - such as HS2. She asks for stamp duty land tax to be abolished for properties under compulsory purchase.

    George Osborne says HS2 goes through his constituency too. He says they've tried to make compensation generous but will look at any ideas she puts forwards, as long as they're affordable.

  67. SNP contribution

    Stewart Hosie
    Image caption: SNP Treasury spokesperson Stewart Hosie asks why voters should trust the pledges of a government who has already failed to deliver on previous promises
  68. Austerity plans

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Michael Meacher asks how the Chancellor can still continue with austerity plans when "it is clear austerity is causing the deficit to rise" - referring to the reduced tax revenues from depressed wages.

    George Osborne says Mr Meacher has his facts wrong. The deficit is 10.2% under the last government it is 5% today, the idea this is an increase is 'nonsense'," he says.

  69. Tax bills

    Margaret Hodge
    Image caption: Public Accounts Committee Chair Margaret Hodge asks when the new powers to tackle tax avoidance will be available to pursue companies that do not pay corporation tax in the UK
  70. Competing on world stage

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Treasury Committee Andrew Tyrie says that it is not enough to do better than EU countries and it is "crucial" to maintain a globally competitive tax system to compete on a world stage.

    George Osborne says he agrees and new measure announced today such as the increase in small R&D tax credit, large company tax credit and change to tax relief for entrepreneurs, will help the UK's competitiveness.

  71. Treasury Committee chair

    Andrew Tyrie
    Image caption: The chair of the Treasury Committee, Andrew Tyrie, says that it is not enough to just do better than the eurozone
  72. Post update

    @stellacreasy

    Labour MP Stella Creasy ‏tweets: wonderfully wry @togetherdarling querying chancellor proclaiming he cut deficit in half in this p'ment-darling's plan osborne rubbished!

  73. What impact?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Chancellor Alastair Darling asks what impact the reduction in the growth forecast in the next five years will have on the tax revenues, which affects the ability to pay down the deficit.

    George Osborne says that though borrowing will fall each year, the OBR figures show there is not the big deterioration of the public finances that everybody predicted.

  74. Financial responsibility

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Chancellor Ken Clarke asks for firm commitments to financial responsibility from nations and cities with power devolved to them, so the Treasury can retain overall responsibility for the UK economy. Not all local Labour leaders "can be trusted", he says.

    After paying tribute to Gordon Brown, George Osborne says devolution agreements do have to have robust arrangement to protect taxpayers across the UK, and this will be at the heart of all devolution settlements.

  75. First speaker from benches

    Kenneth Clarke
    Image caption: Former Chancellor Kenneth Clarke is the first to be called to speak from the backbenches
  76. Borrowing figures challenged

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Chancellor will have borrowed £219bn more than he planned in 2010 according to the OBR, Ed Balls says. The borrowing targets "are all in tatters", he says

    "People are worse off and he has failed to balance the books in this Parliament," he says. Bringing his comments to an end, to loud cheers from Labour benches, Mr Balls says a Labour government is needed to deliver the right Autumn Statement for the country.

  77. Waving his report

    Ed Balls
    Image caption: Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls holds the OBR forecasts which, he says, give the numbers that the Chancellor failed to give in his statement
  78. Stamp duty change welcomed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls welcomes the changes to stamp duty saying the government has belatedly recognised that owners of the most expensive houses are under-taxed.

    He says the average person pays 390 times more in annual council tax as a percentage of their property than a billionaire owner of a £140m penthouse in Knightsbridge.

    He asks why Mr Osborne won't support Labour's annual charge on the highest value properties and use it to invest £2.5bn a year in the NHS.

  79. Pain problem?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls says "maso-sadism" (that's a reference to the PM's slip of the tongue during PMQs earlier, folks) is someone who enjoys having pain inflicted upon them as well as enjoying inflicting pain on others.

    "We know the Chancellor's views on the first part," Ed Balls says, and "it rather seems from the Chancellor's smile when he announced [tax cuts for higher rate tax payers] he enjoyed the second part too," Ed Balls says.

  80. Hard at work

    Autumn Statement
    Image caption: The government frontbench prepare their responses to Mr Balls' criticisms
  81. Labour support on air duty move

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Between interventions from Speaker John Bercow, who has threatened out kick out Conservative MP Guy Opperman due to excessive shouting, Mr Balls announces that Labour will support new plans on air passenger duty, but he asks if the government will work with devolved powers in Scotland.

    He also says he is disappointed that the review on business rates won't report until 2016. Growth from 2016 onwards has been revised down "year after year after year", he says.

  82. Autumn Statement elsewhere

    The Daily Telegraph

    The Telegraph also has a live blog where you can get reaction and analysis as it comes in.

  83. Post update

    @BillEstersonMP

    Labour MP Bill Esterson ‏tweets: "We'll get the Tory hecklers out next year", says @edballsmp

  84. Speaker remonstrates

    John Bercow
    Image caption: Commons Speaker John Bercow tells noisy MPs to keep quiet or leave the chamber
  85. Eurozone weakness

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls says he shares concerns about the eurozone, but its weakness cannot explain why the UK's export performance has been so poor.

    Export performance has been 16th in the G20 since 2010, while three-quarters of EU countries are doing better, he says.

  86. Tax revenue depleting the coffers?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls asks how much tax revenue has been lost by depressed wages. The deficit for this fiscal year is expected to be £91.3bn, but he didn't set out how much borrowing has been revised up compared to the budget, Mr Balls says.

    The government promised to balance the books by 2015, but the Chancellor seems to have announced the deficit next year is expected to be £79.4bn, while national debt is forecast to rise, he says.

  87. Ed Balls responds

    Ed Balls
    Image caption: Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls rises to respond to the Chancellor's statement
  88. What was that stamp duty rise?

    Our colleagues at BBC Business have laid out George Osborne's new stamp duty rates.

    • No tax on the first £125,000 paid
    • 2% on the portion up to £250,000
    • 5% up to £925,000
    • 10% up to £1.5 million
    • 12% on everything above that.

    He said: "As a result stamp duty will be cut for the 98% of homebuyers who pay it."

  89. Working people's concerns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls says wages have not kept pace with prices for 52 of the last 53 months. Wage growth is weaker than expected according to the OBR, he says.

    "For working people there is a cost of living crisis," he adds.

  90. Conservative delight

    George Osborne
    Image caption: The Chancellor finishes his statement to loud cheers from the government benches
  91. 'Serious questions'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Balls says he needs to ask some serious questions to "get to the fact" of the statement.

  92. Post update

    @DPJHodges

    The Telegraph's Dan Hodges tweets: Ed Balls going forensic, not shouty. Always works best for him.

  93. Quiet, please...

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker Bercow admonishes the House to keep quiet for the shadow Chancellor Ed Balls, as the noise rises in the Chamber.

  94. Statement finishes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne sits down to loud cheers from the government benches. Shadow chancellor Ed Balls is now responding to the statement for Labour.

  95. BreakingBreaking News

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne turns to the much-trailed changes to stamp duty. Mr Osborne announces that he is abolishing the residential slab system altogether.

    In future, each stamp duty rate will only apply to the part of the property price that falls within that band - like income tax.

    This means stamp duty will be cut for the 98% of homebuyers who pay it.

  96. New tax rate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The basic rate income tax allowance will rise to £10,600 next year, higher than the £10,500 as originally planned. This will mean higher-rate tax-payers will also benefit, he says.

    This is the first step to the new goal we have set of raising the personal allowance to £12,500.

    The higher rate threshold will also rise from £41,865 this year to £42,385 next year.

  97. Tax on annuities scrapped

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tax on people who pass annuities on to their children will be scrapped, Mr Osborne confirms.

  98. Respect for devolution settlement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Osborne says he will respect the devolution settlement. He announces Northern Ireland will get control of corporation tax - provided the Treasury can be assured that the Northern Ireland executive can handle it.

    The government is also backing the Welsh Assembly getting control of business rates.

  99. New fund

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Osborne announces a new sovereign wealth fund for the North of England to ensure the shale gas resources of the North are used for investment.

  100. Post update

    @chrisshipitv

    ITV's Chris Ship tweets: 'My door is open' says Chancellor, to any other group of councils who want to come together and get devolution like Gtr Manchester

  101. Investment in science

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A quarter of a billion investment in a new Sir Henry Royce Institute for advanced material science in Manchester, with branches in Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield, will be made available Mr Osborne says.

    The government backs the brilliant work on ageing being conducted at Newcastle University and big data computing at Hartree and "have committed to the industry of the North" with investment in new high value manufacturing research, the Chancellor adds.

  102. Northern Powerhouse plans

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Turning to the government's plans to create a "Northern Powerhouse", the government will tender for new franchises for Northern Rail and the Trans-Pennine Express - replacing the "ancient and unpopular pacer carriages" with new and modern trains, Mr Osborne announces.

  103. Post update

    @DJSkelton

    Director of Tory group @renewaluk David Skelton tweets: Good news about big investment on great Northern cities. #AutumnStatement2014

  104. Students and science

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The government will make government-backed student loans of up to £10,000 available, for the first time ever, to all young people undertaking post-grad masters degrees.

    The next step is the allocation of the £6bn on the biggest ever sustained programme of investment in the research facilities of the UK's scientific community, he says.

  105. Contented campaigner

    Robert Halfon
    Image caption: The campaign to keep fuel duty frozen has been spearheaded by the member for Harlow, Robert Halfon
  106. Fuel duty announcement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Fuel duty will remain frozen, George Osborne announces. He attributes this decision to Conservative MP Robert Halfon, who has campaigned on the matter.

    "With my honourable friend for Harlow [Mr Halfon] sitting right behind me, I wouldn't dare do anything else," he says, to cheers.

    From the 1 May next year, Air Passenger Duty for children under 12 will be abolished and from the following year, APD for children under 16 altogether will be removed altogether.

  107. Post update

    @LorelyBurt

    Lib Dem MP Lorely Burt ‏tweets: Double small #businessrates relief for one more year #AutumnStatement

  108. Bank contribution

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    This new Diverted Profits Tax will raise over £1bn over the next five years, he says.

    Banks will now have a limit on the amount of profit in established banks that can be offset by losses carried forward to 50% and delaying relief on bad debts. Together that means banks will contribute almost £4bn more in tax over the next five years.

  109. What is the Autumn Statement?

    The Autumn Statement provides an update on the government's plans for the economy based on the latest forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR).

    The government's Treasury website explains what the Autumn Statement means.

    Treasury building
  110. Multinational business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Osborne says he will make sure that big multinational businesses pay their fair share.

    He announces a 25% tax on profits generated by multinationals from economic activity here in the UK which they then artificially shift out of the country.

  111. Health spend

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Money has been made available because of the government spending plans for 2015-16, which save £13.6bn.

    George Osborne says he will be spending £10bn less this year than in his original spending plans. £2bn of that underspend will go into the NHS.

    Mr Osborne also confirms that he will spend £1.1bn on improving GP services.

  112. Post update

    @ShippersUnbound

    Political Editor of The Sunday Times Tim Shipman ‏tweets: Let's go crazy with the credit card. We've just paid off the First World War debt. Only 100 years on

  113. Frontbench listening avidly

    Jeremy Hunt
    Image caption: Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt nods with approval at the mention of investment in the NHS
  114. Post update

    @MaryMacleodMP

    Conservative MP Mary Macleod tweets: @George_Osborne "85% of new jobs are full time and gender pay gap has fallen to lowest level in history". Excellent! #AutumnStatement

  115. Budget surplus predicted

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Today's borrowing forecasts also show an improvement on the budget forecasts. Borrowing is falling from £97.5bn last year, to £91.3bn this year, then £75.9bn next year until a surplus of £4bn in 2018-19.

    It falls slightly less than expected in the first two years, he says but then falls slightly more than expected in the four years after that, where we will end in a marginally stronger position than expected at the Budget.

    To a chorus of cheers her says that by 2019-20 Britain is now predicted to have a budget surplus of budget £23bn.

  116. Post update

    Rebecca Keating

    BBC News

    . @GeorgeOsborne says MPs will vote in the New Year on a new Charter for Budget Responsibility

  117. On target?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Inflation is down too. The OBR have significantly revised their forecast for inflation he says - it is expected to be down to 1.5% this year, 1.2% next year and 1.7% the year after, before it returns to target.

  118. Earnings grew 4%, Chancellor says

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In a direct attack on Labour's claims of a "cost of living crisis", George Osborne says earnings grew 4% over the last year.

    The effect of many more people finding work, is weighing down on overall average earnings, he admits, but the OBR today predict that "meaningful real wage growth" will pick up through next year and grow above inflation for the next five years.

    GDP per capita has grown faster on average in this Parliament than over the last two Parliaments combined, he says, and "regular earnings growth is now faster than inflation".

  119. Unemployment figures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Osborne says the OBR has revised down its unemployment forecasts "for every day this government has been in office, 1,000 new jobs have been created".

    In March, the OBR forecast that in the first three quarters of the year the number claiming unemployment benefit would fall by 7%.

    "Today, they say it actually fell by 23%," he says.

  120. Growth up, Chancellor announces

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The OBR had revised up their forecasts for growth this year, Mr Osborne says to loud cheers from the government benches.

    "A year ago, we expected GDP to grow by 2.4%. In March we expected 2.7% " he says. Today, the British economy is forecast to grow by 3%.

    This means that over the last year we have grown two and half times faster than Germany; over three times faster than the Eurozone; and over seven times faster than France, he adds.

  121. Package to boost exports

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The OBR has revised down its forecast for global growth, this year and ever year, the Chancellor says.

    He notes that the slowdown is particularly acute in the UK's main export markets, such as Europe, where growth is a full 1% lower this year than previously forecast.

    To help, Mr Osborne announces a £45m package to boost exports.

  122. Standing room only

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons chamber
    Image caption: The Commons chamber is packed for the Chancellor's Autumn Statement
  123. New statistical standards

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Turning to the OBR's report, Mr Osborne says there are new statistical standards that have changed the assessment of the economy.

    There was no recession in this parliament, no double-dip recession and the economy has grown 8% this Parliament, while business investment has risen 27%.

  124. Finding work

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Employment may be at a record high, he says but we must never give up on the task of finding work for all young people.

    The UK moves further towards full employment by supporting the businesses that create jobs and apprenticeships, he says.

    The UK must now to build a Northern Powerhouse to rebalance the economy.

  125. Chancellor on his feet

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne
    Image caption: The Chancellor is making the last Autumn Statement before the next general election - which will be in May next year
  126. More to do

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne says that while business investment is rising strongly, there is still much more to do on productivity.

    "So today we boost our skills, our exports, our science and our infrastructure," he says.

  127. 'Stay the course'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Osborne says growth is higher, unemployment is falling, inflation is down and the deficit is being cut. The choice is whether to stay the course, or squander this. George Osborne says he will "stay the course".

    Measures today will not be a net giveaway, and actually tighten the finances slightly. He could have produced a give away but he hasn't, he says.

  128. Autumn Statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chancellor George Osborne is now making the last Autumn Statement of this government. to loud cheers he opens by telling MP the defict is today half what the government inherited.

  129. Cancer treatment question

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Seema Malhotra says cancer treatment target has been missed for nine months in England.

    Doesn't this prove yet again "you cannot trust the Tories with the NHS", she says.

    David Cameron says he shares concerns over the need for rapid cancer treatments. But 160,00 people are getting cancer treatment than in 2010 and the government are meeting all but one cancer target, he says.

    Unlike Wales - where the Labour-run Welsh Assembly controls the health services - where they "haven't met a cancer target since 2008", he says.

  130. Bolsover MP

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dennis Skinner
    Image caption: Veteran MP Dennis Skinner asks the prime minister a question during a noisy PMQs
  131. Blame Labour?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Dennis Skinner asks David Cameron if he is proud of the fact that he has added £430bn to the national debt - more than all the Labour chancellors this century, he says. Mr Cameron can't blame Labour for that, he says.

    "Oh yes I can," says David Cameron, attributing it to the coalition inheriting a failing economy.

  132. Wages concern

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Stephen Timms says that after four years the government can only claim that the deficit has came down by a third. The fall in real wages is an explanation of why the economic plan has fallen so far short, he says.

    David Cameron wonders why Labour MPs are now suddenly interested in the deficit. The government took tough decisions, cutting some departments by 20%, he says, while Labour opposed all their plans.

  133. Twitter erupts

    Twitter erupts with jokes galore about the PM's mis-speaking of "maso-sadism".

    Political commentator Gaby Hinsliff ‏tweets: Oh god, it's all gone a bit fifty shades of grey #pmqs

    Executive Editor of ConservativeHome Mark Wallace ‏tweets: Ed Balls just mimed whipping the Prime Minister like a dominatrix. Suddenly find myself opposed to televising parliament. #PMQs

    BBC presenter and Times columnist Libby Purves ‏tweets: PMQ is so bonkers. One minute it's "mass-sadism", next minute it's trains to Shrewsbury (?) now it's Camero-masochism. Boys, boys...

  134. Post update

    @paulwaugh

    PoliticsHome.com's Paul Waugh tweets: Did Cam mean to say 'Maso-sadism'? Well, Speaker Bercow can't resist 'We all know what the Prime Minister means...'

  135. Er - maso-sadism?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Mary Glindon asks David Cameron to explain why the government has borrowed £4bn more this year than last year.

    Does he regret his promise to "balance the books", she asks.

    The PM says the government has had to borrow a lot of money as they have inherited the biggest deficit in the world - 11% of GDP. Shadow chancellor Ed Balls has promised to be "tough on the causes of the deficit" Mr Cameron says.

    "As he is one of the causes of the deficit its the first example of political maso-sadism," he says.

    The chamber promptly erupts into a roar of sound...

  136. Final exchanges between leaders

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Miliband accuses David Cameron of visiting the "David Mellor school of charm". David Cameron said he would balance the books in five years' time.

    Did he mean it? Mr Miliband asks.

    David Cameron says the deficit is down by a third. He says when the Autumn Statement is announced, Ed Miliband will be looking as awkward as "when he ate that bacon sandwich". He says Labour has been wrong on every economic issue.

    Responding Mr Miliband says Mr Cameron has turned breaking promises "into an art form" and that people now know when Mr Cameron says something, he does not mean it.

    David Cameron says no-one will forget that Labour sold the gold, broke the economy and bankrupted the economy.

    To loud cries of "more" from Tory MPs, Speaker John Bercow opens up the debate to backbench MPs.

  137. Post update

    Robin Brant

    Political correspondent

    .@David_Cameron will be very often reminded of his - broken - promise to get net migration down to tens of thousands by 2015

  138. Post update

    @janemerrick23

    Political Editor of the Independent on Sunday Jane Merrick tweets: Cameron says Osborne will deliver #AS2014 "in a moment or two". This is a LIE. It's in 16 minutes #CameronMustGoAndBuyHimselfAWatch

  139. Living standards

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Miliband tells MPs the 2010 Conservative manifesto promised an economy where standards of living rise. Again he asks if Mr Cameron meant this promise.

    David Cameron says taxes have been cut for 20 million people. The minimum wage has been increased and pay is going up by 4%.

  140. Labour leader

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Miliband
    Image caption: To noisy cheers and jeers in the House of Commons, Ed Miliband challenges the prime minister over the despatch box
  141. Taking all day?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to jeering from Labour MPs, David Cameron says he has all day to respond and he's looking forward to what comes next i.e the Autumn Statement.

    David Cameron
  142. Noisy chamber

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Miliband says David Cameron made a solemn promise and he broke it. Mr Miliband also accuses David Cameron of breaking a promise on no more "pointless reorganisations" of the NHS.

    Mr Miliband asks again if Mr Cameron meant that?

    To loud jeering from Labour MPs, Mr Cameron says there are more doctors, more nurses and more patients treated. He says he has a list of Ed Miliband's promises: a promised a graduate tax, an alternative policy review, and a list of business people he had dinner with. He asks where these are.

  143. Post update

    @jameschappers

    James Chapman (Daily Mail) tweets: Nick Clegg absent from #pmqs for the third week running. Will he turn up for autumn statement?

  144. Immigration promise

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ed Miliband accuses the prime minster of breaking his promises to cut immigration. In his contract with the British people, David Cameron said the people should vote him out if he did not deliver, Mr Miliband says.

    He asks "did he mean it?"

    David Cameron says he has cut immigration from outside the EU by 23%. whereas Labour put immigration up as an act of policy, he says.

  145. Post update

    @DavidWooding

    Sun on Sunday Political Editor David Wooding ‏tweets: Ed Miliband hurls the PM's words back in his face: "Immigration down to 10s of thousands, no ifs, no buts." #pmqs

  146. Ed Miliband stands up

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour Leader Ed Miliband quotes the prime minster who said "woe betide the politicians that makes big promises but then says he doesn't really mean it".

    He asks if that's ever happened to the prime minister.

    David Cameron says he promised to get the economy going, and it is now the fastest growing in the G7. The government has kept its commitment to cutting unemployment as well he says.

  147. Balancing the books?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Robert Flello asks why the government have not "balanced the books" and cut the deficit as it promised. The country desperately needs a Labour government, he says.

    David Cameron says the deficit has been cut by a third due to difficult decisions made by the Conservative party, all of which had been opposed by Labour.

  148. PMQs kicks off

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Prime Minister David Cameron is now at the despatch box kicking off prime minster's questions. He opens the session by paying tribute to British Embassy staff killed and injured in Kabul.

  149. PM has arrived

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Prime Minister David Cameron
    Image caption: Prime Minister David Cameron is now in the chamber ahead of prime minister's questions
  150. Depressed wages

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Wales secretary Peter Hain says the government's "much trumpeted economic plan" is leading to depressed wages in Wales, generating lower taxes and government borrowing "overshooting Labour's borrowing target by £20bn".

    He asks the minsters to apologise for "this abysmal failure in their austerity strategy".

    Alun Cairns says it is Mr Hain who should apologise for "leaving Wales as the poorest part of the UK" during his term in office. The government's economic plan is working for Wales, he says.

  151. Post update

    David Cornock

    BBC Wales Parliamentary correspondent

    Shadow Welsh Secretary @OwenSmithMP says tax receipts in Wales down by £2bn since 2010 #autumnstatement

  152. Living wage

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Chris Evans asks if the Wales Office will follow the example of his own constituency office and the Welsh Assembly and pledge to pay all its staff a minimum of the living wage.

    Wales Minister Alun Cairns says the Wales Office already pays above the living wage, but says this is a decision for employers to make.

  153. Questions from all sides of the House

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welsh Secretary Stephen Crabb
    Image caption: Welsh Secretary Stephen Crabb is fielding questions from MPs
  154. Post update

    Robert Peston

    Economics editor

    Big focus on this year's deficit, which will be bit worse than March forecast. But forecast for next few years v important #AutumnStatement

  155. No money

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Wales minister Nia Griffiths says the government have not spent "single penny" on its announced plans to electrify railways, build prisons and build a tidal lagoon in Wales.

    The government has, in fact, cut the Welsh Capital budget, she says.

    Stephen Crabb says he is "baffled by the claims" as under the previous Labour government did nothing to improve infrastructure.

  156. South West Wales investment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards accuses the government of conspiring with the Welsh Assembly to "stitch up" South West Wales.

    Mr Edwards says the new transport infrastructure announcement will see £89 spend per head of population in South West Wales compared to compared to £859 in South East Wales.

    Wales Secretary Stephen Crabb says the government is providing resources for the upgrade of the M4, but he says he agrees that there should be more investment in South West Wales.

  157. Post update

    @TomBlenkinsop

    Labour MP Tom Blenkinsop tweets: Debt doubled,an accrual of debt in 4yrs more than over 13yrs under Labour. Today the UK has the worst deficit in the EU #0sborne #ToryFail

  158. Post update

    @LauraSandysMP

    Conservative MP Laura Sandys tweets: Just on @SkyNews - great that we've turned a corner with low unemployment & stable inflation and are on track with deficit #AutumnStatement

  159. Kick off

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem MP Jenny Willott kicks off today's business in the House of Commons asking about free childcare places for three and four-year-olds in Wales.

  160. Paying off debts

    Chancellor George Osborne is to pay off the UK government's remaining debt from World War One, the Treasury has announced.

    The government will repay the outstanding £1.9bn of debt from a 3.5% War Loan on 9 March 2015.

    The move goes further than October's announcement that the government would pay off £218m of debts from World War One.

    More than 120,000 investors hold War Loan bonds.

    trenches
  161. Post update

    @BBCLouise

    BBC's Louise Stewart tweets: Chanceller @George_Osborne & Danny Alexander have just left the Treasury to head to House of Commons for final #AutumnStatement before elex

  162. Business background

    Our colleagues over in BBC Business are analysing the run-up to the Chancellor's Autumn Statement on a live blog which you can read here.

    It has fantastic coverage of the business background, the forecasts and the detail of the Chancellor's Autumn Statement. Stick with us for the day's events as they unfold in Westminster.

  163. Analysis

    Norman Smith

    BBC Assistant Political Editor

    The Conservatives' strategist Lynton Crosby likes to tell the party: "A day not talking about the economy is a day wasted."

    The chancellor will be seeking to hammer home the good news - growth revised upwards, and earnings at last beginning to rise.

    But he is unlikely to have as much to shout about when it comes to cutting the deficit - the Office for Budget Responsibility March forecast for borrowing in 2014-15 was £86.6bn, but George Osborne is expected to announce it's higher than this.

  164. Kick off

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    But before all that the day starts at 11.30 GMT with questions to Welsh Secretary Stephen Crabb and his ministerial team.

    Watch out for the devolutionary fallout from the Smith Commission recommendations and Welsh MPs setting out their stalls for new powers for the Welsh Assembly.

  165. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And finally, today's adjournment debate will be led by Labour MP Toby Perkins on the effect of changes in annual pension allowance on workers transferred out of public sector pension schemes.

  166. Doughty campaigner

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Undaunted by the day's events, DUP MP Jim Shannon will also table a ten minute rule bill to require all buses to have audio announcements.

    Mr Shannon says nine out of 10 blind people have stated that they need and feel that audio assistance on buses is necessary. UK charity Guide Dogs for the Blind says that buses play a vital role in enabling disabled people and are campaigning for a change in the law.

  167. Post update

    Nick Robinson

    Political editor

    In our bubble on the Green with @afneil preparing to go on air for BBC2 Autumn Statement special

    BBC political team
    Image caption: BBC's political team ready to go on air
  168. And then?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are expected to wave through the remaining stages of the Taxation of Pensions Bill.

    The bill would allow those aged 55 or over to access, or "draw down", their defined contribution pension savings in whatever form that they wish without having to purchase an annuity. The scheme is due to come into force in April 2015.

  169. What else is on?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    We also have the weekly duel between David Cameron and Ed Miliband at 12.00 GMT with prime minister's questions. Expect a raucous affair as MPs build up to the Chancellor's big set-piece economic announcement.

  170. Post update

    James Landale

    Deputy Political Editor, BBC News

    BBC's Deputy Political Editor James Lansdale has produced a handy blog on the potential political ramifications of today's announcement.

    In it he says:

    George Osborne is trying to change the subject. For months now the national conversation has been dominated by everything the Conservatives would rather avoid: defections and by-elections, Europe and UKIP, crises in A&E, immigration and yet more immigration.

    These are all issues that either favour the Conservatives' opponents or stop them talking about their chosen agenda, namely the economy.

    So to clear the decks, the prime minister announced his plans for immigration on Friday. The aim here was to close down the issue and give the Tory faithful something to say to UKIP.

    And then on Sunday the chancellor announced his plans for more NHS spending. The aim here was to neutralise Labour's traditional comparative advantage on health. (The chancellor tried to link the economy with health, saying that only a strong economy could provide the funds needed by the NHS. For some reason, he chose not to say that it is also a strong economy that attracts so many immigrants from abroad.)

    The purpose of all this, Downing Street insiders say, is "to clear the boulders out of the way" so the path is clear for the chancellor to talk about the economy and his plan, long-term or not.

  171. Good morning

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Welcome to today's Autumn Statement special edition of our rolling coverage of the day's events in Parliament.

    We'll be giving you the political reaction from parliament as George Osborne delivers the final Autumn Statement of this Parliament.

    The chancellor will take to the despatch box around 12.30 GMT and while several big measures have already been announced - including more NHS spending, and a £15bn road strategy - we are expecting fresh announcements on tax and spending from Mr Osborne.

    As well as the monetary impact of today's announcements it's also a highly political occasion because it will set the parameters for the economic debate up to the election.

    There's also talk of a sweeping cost-cutting reorganisation of government. We shall see.