Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. The day for MPs began at 14.30 GMT with questions to the education team.
  2. Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin outlined £15bn to be spent on road infrastructure in England.
  3. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt then outlined the government's plans for £2bn of funding for the NHS.
  4. MPs agreed to an emergency debate on the Foreign Affairs Committee being refused visas to visit Hong Kong by the Chinese embassy.
  5. The Commons then overturned several amendments made to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill made in the House of Lords, including on judicial review
  6. Conservative MP Damian Collins led the adjournment debate on the jurisdiction of the Serious Fraud Office, and the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bids.
  7. Peers sat from 14.30 GMT with oral questions the first item of business.
  8. The day's main business was the Modern Slavery Bill which was debated in a committee of the whole House.
  9. The short debate was on the report of the All Party Parliamentary Inquiry into electoral conduct.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

  1. Goodbye

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And that's the end of business in the House of Lords.

    The House will sit again at 14.30 GMT tomorrow when the main business will be the second reading of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill.

  2. End of business in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business in the House of Commons has now concluded and will return tomorrow at 11.30 GMT, when the main business will be a debate on China's refusal to let the Foreign Affairs Committee visit Hong Kong on a fact-finding mission and the new Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill.

    Stay with us though as the House of Lords continues to give the Modern Slavery Bill committee stage scrutiny.

  3. SFO 'ready to act'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Solicitor General Robert Buckland is responding to the debate for the government. He tells MPs that, while rugby is his "first love", he is sympathetic to Mr Collins' concerns.

    He says it is not correct to make an assumption that the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) should have the jurisdiction to investigate claims of corruption in Fifa.

    However the SFO is conducting its own review into the claims, and "stands ready" to work alongside colleagues around the world, including Switzerland - where Fifa has lodged a criminal complaint against certain individuals involved with the country's attorney general.

  4. 'Proceeds of slavery'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Over in the Lords, crossbench peer Lord Alton is introducing an amendment which would require the government to establish a modern slavery victims' fund to receive and distribute the proceeds of slavery.

    Lord Alton of Liverpool
  5. External pressure needed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Collins alleges that Fifa had set up their internal investigations to fail. Fifa has no legal powers to pursue an investigation and request information from people inside its organisation, let alone those outside of its investigation, Mr Collins tells MPs.

    Without the involvement of the Serious Fraud Office and the FBI it will be impossible to know the truth, he says. It is only external pressure that will bring about change in Fifa, he argues.

    Concluding his remarks Mr Collins says: "Together we need to act to save football from Fifa."

    Damian Collins
    Image caption: Damian Collins says the world deserves to know the truth about the bidding process for the World Cups in Russia and Qatar
  6. Law change rejected

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Garden opposes the amendment to criminalise paying for sexual services.

    She tells the House that ministers are not convinced that a radical change in the law on prostitution would succeed "in reducing harm to those involved".

  7. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to today's final business in the House of Commons, the adjournment debate, on a topical subject - the jurisdiction of the Serious Fraud Office and the 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bids.

    The debate is led by the Conservative former member of the Culture Committee, Damian Collins, who has long taken an interest in the running of football.

    Mr Collins says he wants to see Fifa, the governing body of world football, to be subject to the "full force of international law" over allegations of corruption during the bidding process to stage the World Cups in 2018 and 2022.

  8. Remaining amendments agreed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs agree to the remaining amendments made to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill. The bill will now pass back the House of Lords where peers will consider MPs' changes.

    This is an example of the famous ritual of parliamentary ping-pong, in which legislation re-written by one House is sent to the other, so that the changes can be accepted or rejected.

    Peers can attempt to re-instate removed clauses, but given the strength of the vote in House of Commons this is unlikely and some form of compromise is on the cards.

  9. Northern Ireland vote

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Democratic Unionist peer Lord Browne of Belmont argues that prostitution's "inherent harms and dangers would only be exacerbated" if the trade were decriminalised.

    He claims that Sweden, which has criminalised the buying of sex, has a lower incidence of trafficking.

    In October, the Northern Ireland Assembly voted overwhelmingly to make paying for sex illegal - although the private member's bill still has legislative hurdles to go through before the law can be changed.

  10. Victims of slavery

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The measures contained in the Modern Slavery Bill apply to England and Wales.

    A Home Office report last week said that between 10,000 and 13,000 people are victims of slavery in the UK, higher than a previous estimate by the National Crime Agency.

    According to the report, slaves include people forced into prostitution and imprisoned domestic workers.

    In addition to the bill, the government will publish a modern slavery strategy in January 2015.

  11. List of amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A full list of amendments made in the House of Lords, and the government's position on them, can be found in this note from the House of Commons.

  12. Sexual grooming

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After a brief debate at committee stage in the House of Lords, the government also agreed to reduce the threshold for prosecuting someone for child sexual grooming.

    At present, the offence occurs where a person has met or communicated with the child "on at least two occasions" and subsequently meets (or travels to meet) the child intending to commit sexual offences.

    The amendment would mean the perpetrator would only have had to met or communicated with the child on "one or more" occasions rather than "at least two".

  13. Offence of paying for sex

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord McColl's amendment would create an offence of paying for sexual services.

    Sexual exploitation is the most prevalent form of exploitation in this country, Lord McColl argues, adding that there is "insufficient deterrence" for those who profit from it.

  14. 'Revenge porn' offence

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill's passage through the House of Lords the government committed to creating a new offence of disclosing private sexual photographs and films with intent to cause distress - known as "revenge porn" - following pressure from Liberal Democrat peer Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames.

    The offence, which will extend to England and Wales, will be triable either way and punishable with a maximum custodial sentence of two years.

  15. Government amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to a group of government amendments made in the Lords and two Lords amendments accepted by the government.

  16. Slavery Bill debate resumes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are resuming debate on the Modern Slavery Bill at committee stage.

    Crossbench peer Baroness Young of Hornsey is introducing an amendment which would create a legal liability for the beneficiaries of slavery.

  17. MPs back secure college access

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have backed government proposals to allow girls and boys under the age of 15 to attend secure colleges for young offenders.

    Peers had argued that safeguarding plans for the colleges were inadequate, and that there were so few girls in custody they could easily be accommodated in smaller, more appropriate secure children's homes.

    But the government argued that excluding young boys and girls from the secure colleges would rob them of improved care and services provided at the colleges, which they believe will help cut re-offending rates.

    Currently young offenders are sent to either a secure training centre or a young offenders institution, depending on their age and offences, where they spend an average of 12 hours a week in education while in detention - but the new colleges would double that.

    MPs approved the reintroduction by 316 votes to 194, a government majority of 122.

  18. Inquiry recommendations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The all-party inquiry into electoral conduct took evidence from a wide variety of sources, including every Westminster party except Respect.

    As well as finding instances of racist and homophobic campaigning by candidates for major parties, its report highlighted the issue of arms-length and unaffiliated groups engaging in discriminatory campaigning.

    The report's recommendations include an agreed mechanism for reporting discrimination and a call for political parties to improve their anti-discrimination training.

    It also suggested a code of conduct for advertising during campaigns.

  19. Secure colleges

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn their attention to Lords amendment 74, which would exclude all girls, and boys aged under 15, from the government's proposed secure colleges.

    The government opposes this amendment as, it says, it will deny girls and young boys access to secure colleges.

    Justice Minister Andrew Selous argues that the colleges are the best way to ensure that young people are able to gain the skills and self-discipline they need to "build productive law-abiding lives".

    Under the government's plans, girls and boys aged under 15 will not be introduced when secure colleges are first opened, in order to allow for the introduction of provisions to ensure their safety.

  20. Electoral conduct debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are taking a break from consideration of the Modern Slavery Bill to take part in a short debate on the report of an all-party inquiry into electoral conduct.

    The inquiry examined discrimination in elections and found instances of racist and homophobic campaigning by candidates for major parties.

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Alderdice, who was a member of the inquiry team, is leading the debate.

    He says the inquiry heard "disturbing stories of racism" from MPs, parliamentary candidates and others.

  21. Judicial review plans backed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to back the government's plans on judicial review, which survive relatively unchanged, with minor concessions on whether judges have discretion to charge organisations intervening in cases.

    MPs back the plans by 314 votes to 198, a government majority of 116.

  22. Domestic worker abuse

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hylton says he is concerned about the exploitation and abuse of foreign domestic workers in the UK.

    "I fail to see how this bill actually increases any protection," he tell the House.

    He adds that he would welcome a further meeting with ministers on the subject, in which case he would withdraw the amendment.

    Speaking for the government, Baroness Garden agrees to further discussions.

    Lord Hylton
  23. Employment rights

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Hylton has tabled an amendment that would make it an offence "to deny access to an employment tribunal to a person entering the United Kingdom on a visa restricting the person to a single employer".

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Garden argues that access to the protection of employment rights is "generally available" to those working in the UK and the amendment is not necessary.

  24. Legal costs changes reinstated

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to reinstate a presumption that third parties intervening in a judicial review will pay their own costs and any costs incurred by any other party because of the intervention, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

    By convention, third parties in other legal proceedings generally bear their own costs, but do not bear other costs or benefit from costs awards, but the government says this reform will ensure that those who choose to become involved in litigation have a "more proportionate financial interest in the outcome".

    This overturns an amendment made by the House of Lords that gave the High Court and the Court of Appeal power to require those who intervene to pay the costs of the other parties to the judicial review and vice versa - to require the other parties to the judicial review to pay any costs of the intervener.

    MPs backed government plans by 312 votes to 200, a government majority of 112.

  25. Government defeat reversed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to reinstate a ban on judicial review applications that do not provide information about the financing of the judicial review, overturning a second Lords amendment which would have given the High Court the discretion to allow an application for judicial review to go ahead even though the claimant had not provided such information.

    The government's reforms are aimed at preventing claimants from hiding how they are funding judicial review applications in order to limit their cost exposure and stopping courts from making them liable for the defendant's costs if they lose.

    The government claims that such judicial review applications are often funded by an anonymous backer or companies created for the purpose, who do not want to pay for the costs they are liable for.

    MPs backed the government's plans by 315 votes to 203, a government majority of 112.

  26. MPs vote on peers' amendments

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote to overturn a series of House of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill which aimed to ensure that judges kept their discretion over many aspects of judicial review applications.

    Former Conservative cabinet minister John Selwyn-Gummer (now Lord Deben), and the former Tory chancellor Lord Howe both voted to reinstate the measures in the House of Lords along with 17 Liberal Democrat peers, including former party leader Lord Steel and Baroness Williams.

    Earlier Mr Grayling told MPs that there was a need to end unnecessary delays and curb the activities of campaigners who use judicial review to frustrate government initiatives.

    MPs overturned the Lords amendments by 319 votes to 203, a government majority of 116.

  27. Trafficking offence

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are considering a group of amendments to the Modern Slavery Bill, including a Labour amendment defining the offence of human trafficking.

    Under the amendment human trafficking will have been committed if a person "recruits, transports, transfers, harbours or receives another person including by exchange or transfer of control over that other person".

  28. Rise in Judicial Review cases?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The use of judicial review has increased more than threefold in recent years from around 4,240 in 2000 to around 15,600 in 2013.

    However, that increase has been predominantly in immigration and asylum cases where it has been used as a pragmatic means of appealing decisions.

    The rise in other judicial reviews over the period has been far more modest. Civil judicial reviews have increased from 1,730 in 2000 to 2,190 in 2013.

    According to the BBC's legal correspondent Clive Coleman the government wins the overwhelming majority of these cases, in part because few individuals or pressure groups have the streamlined legal resources of central or local government.

    However Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has himself been successfully judicially reviewed twice in recent months over his legal aid reforms - one of which affected the legal costs recoverable by those suffering from the asbestos-related cancer mesothelioma.

  29. Slavery debate resumes

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers return to the Modern Slavery Bill in committee.

    Debate resumes with consideration of government amendments aimed at protecting child victims of trafficking.

  30. Alternative amendment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Justice Secretary Chris Grayling tables an alternative amendment to the one received from the House of Lords, in an effort to appease MPs.

    In October, peers voted to restore judicial discretion to several elements of the reforms, including ensuring that judges retain discretion over several elements of Mr Grayling's plans to curtail judicial review.

    The government is attempting to reverse most of those changes but has conceded on a clause about whether judges have discretion to charge organisations intervening in cases. Tabling his amendment, Mr Grayling tells MPs that none of the government's reforms will prevent citizens from applying for judicial review.

    Judicial review is currently being used as a campaigning tool by pressure groups to bring attention or delay government proposals for financial reasons, and the time has come to "set some limits" to its uses, he adds.

  31. NHS reorganisation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Lord Willis of Knaresborough cautions against further NHS reorganisation, describing Labour plans to repeal the coalition's Health and Social Care Act as "worrying".

    Liberal Democrats may have had some disagreements with the act, he says, but adds: "The last thing the health service wants is another reorganisation".

  32. Labour response

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Wheeler is responding to the NHS statement in the Lords.

    She claims that some of the £2bn funding has already been allocated, with "£700m recycled".

  33. Criminal Justice Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to the Consideration of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

    The government suffered three major defeats in the Lords over plans to curtail the use of judicial review.

    One amendment was won by 66 votes, which may incline peers to stick to their guns on that particular point if MPs reverse their decision.

    The Commons response to this is hugely significant, given the widespread outrage at the proposed changes from lawyers and campaign groups alike.

  34. Post update

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Speaker John Bercow says he agrees this is an important subject, "not comparable" with anything he's seen in his 17 years as an MP.

    MPs unanimously agree to a debate on the subject, and Mr Becrow announces it will be the first item of public business tomorrow and will last for up to three hours.

  35. Post update

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Applications for emergency debates are made under Standing Order 24.

    Under Standing Order 24, an MP has three minutes to make the case for an emergency debate.

    If the Speaker grants the request, the emergency debate will take place within 24 hours.

    MPs demonstrate their support for an emergency debate by standing up in the chamber.

  36. Hong Kong visit refused

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, Sir Richard Ottaway, is requesting an emergency debate on China's refusal to let MPs visit Hong Kong on a fact-finding mission.

    MPs on the committee were planning to visit Hong Kong as part of an inquiry into Hong Kong-UK relations, but the Chinese Government has accused the committee of interfering in China's internal affairs.

    A Downing Street spokesman described China's decision as mistaken and counter-productive.

    Hong Kong has seen protests against a new law limiting the choice of candidates in its 2017 elections.

  37. 'Political football'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen says the "outrageous comments of the leader of the opposition" show that Labour are happy to see the NHS used as a "political football".

    Mr Hunt says that the public are confused by Labour not welcoming investment that will mean more doctors and nurses on the frontline and not recognising the "fundamental point" that there needs to be a culture of safety and compassionate care backing NHS workers.

  38. 'Full fiscal autonomy'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Angus MacNeil says today's announcement has only come about due to the needs of NHS England.

    If there had been acute need in Scotland or Wales "we could have whistled for it", he claims.

    This is why there needs to be full fiscal autonomy for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, he adds.

    Sidestepping the question, Mr Hunt says the benefit of devolving NHS services to Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales means services can be compared. Patients in England wait shorter times for operations, he adds.

  39. Lords NHS statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have taken a break in their consideration of the Modern Slavery Bill while Health Minister Earl Howe repeats a statement on the the future of the NHS, which Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt delivered to the Commons earlier.

    On Sunday, Chancellor George Osborne announced £2bn of funding for the NHS.

  40. 'Dark history'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says his fellow Conservative peer Lord James has done the House a service by drawing attention to the country's "dark history" over its treatment of children.

    Lord James called for assurances that the Modern Slavery Bill would prevent anyone sending unaccompanied children overseas again.

    Lord Bates says he can give that assurance.

    Lord Bates
  41. Coming up

    Clive Coleman

    Legal correspondent, BBC News

    The House of Commons will shortly debate government plans to reform it, contained in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, which Labour's Shadow Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary Sadiq Khan has described as "an unconstitutional attack on the rights of the British people".

    It that hyperbole, or is this truly a constitutional issue of unique importance? Legal correspondent Clive Coleman examines the issue.

  42. Money for pay rises?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Karl Turner asks a question for his mother, who was a nurse, who he says wants to know why, if there was £700m spare in the Department of Health budget, Mr Hunt hasn't funded an above 1% pay rise for NHS staff - which would only have cost £200m, Mr Turner claims.

    Mr Hunt says the government has shown its commitment to the NHS through the £2bn investment announced today, along with a 1% pay rise for staff.

  43. Home care funding?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former health minister Paul Burstow asks if some of the £2bn will be diverted to the better care fund to fund home care.

    Mr Hunt says home care will be an important part of the future of the NHS and home care may well get some of the funding from the £200m earmarked to help develop new models of care.

  44. UK 'serial offender' against children

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord James tells peers that UK governments have been "serial offenders for the last 233 years" in the trafficking of children.

    The UK sent children to its colonies in the Americas, South Africa and Australia, he argues.

    The Conservative peer says he was involved in the sending of children to Australia without their parents, as a religious liaison officer for the Australian civil service in London.

    "To my eternal regret, I was in charge of that scheme," he says, adding: "If they had given me a Gestapo uniform to go with it, it would not have been inappropriate."

  45. Devolved obligations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Independent Northern Irish MP Sylvia Hermon asks for confirmation that George Osborne will announce an obligation on the Northern Ireland Assembly to spend the devolved funding on health matters in Wednesday's Autumn Statement.

    Mr Hunt says he believes the system is that devolved legislatures will have a choice on how they spend money announced today, due to the Barnett Formula.

  46. Holistic view of care

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin says he welcomes "every word" of the announcement, especially the commitment to culture change. He asks how CCG's will be persuaded to hand over some of their commissioning responsibility to community facilities that will be built under the announced £1bn fund.

    M Hunt says reforms announced this afternoon will encourage CCG to take a holistic view on the care of patients and away from a piecemeal commissioning of care.

  47. Contract figures?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former health secretary Frank Dobson asks how much is being diverted away from patient care into negotiating legally binding contracts between NHS commissioners and suppliers.

    He predicts Mr Hunt will not be able to as "he doesn't bother to collect" figures on the subject.

    Mr Hunt says he can confirm that rules about contracting out services have been inherited from the Labour government.

  48. Health Committee stance

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Health Committee, Dr Sarah Wollaston, welcomes the announcement. She asks whether the paperless commitment will work through from primary to secondary care and "be in control of the patients themselves".

    Mr Hunt says this is an important part of this process. The commitment is to a "paperless NHS" not to paperless hospitals, he says.

  49. Historic slavery

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord James of Blackheath tells the House of Lords that he is the son of two people "who met as children in an orphanage".

    He says his father was put to work as "an unpaid kitchen boy" at a London restaurant for 11 years.

    Lord James adds that, while his father thought he was better fed at the restaurant than in the orphanage, his situation would now be defined as slavery "and it is wrong".

    Lord James of Blackheath
  50. Post update

    @politicshome

    PoliticsHome ‏tweets: Burnham attacks Jeremy Hunt on NHS: "People deserve better than a Chancellor fiddling the figures and a health secretary spinning the facts"

  51. Labour's record attacked

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to Mr Burnham's comments Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt attacks Labour's track record on the NHS.

    There will be £2bn of new money for the NHS, he reassures MPs - £1bn from the treasury and £1bn from departmental savings. The government is on track to deal with issues, such as a lack of beds, on the NHS frontline.

    Raising his voice to speak over a noisy House of Commons chamber, Mr Hunt says the NHS is not a "weapon" for political parties to attack each other with, but is there to help patients. It's for "saving lives, not to save political spins" he adds.

  52. Post update

    ‏@elashton

    The Sun's Emily Ashton tweets: Tory ministers were branded a "bunch of numpties" in the Commons today - Bercow ruled it was "tasteless" but not unparliamentary

  53. Post update

    Hugh Pym

    BBC health editor

    Burnham says £2billion for NHS was " false promise" as £700 mill already in Health budget

  54. Labour response

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health secretary Andy Burnham says many people have died for waiting for ambulances, and beds in hospitals and mental health care services. Jeremy Hunt is ignoring these pressure, and nothing in today's announcement will address them, he says.

    The NHS is on the brink of its worst winter in years, he warns.

    The figure £2bn trailed at the weekend was not mentioned once during the statement he says. Mr Burnham says this is because the figure is due to accounting sleight of hand and £700m of it is not new money but is already in the Health Department's budget.

    A further £1bn will be coming from cuts to things like social care, which will only lead to extra costs for the NHS, he says.

    Most of what he has announced will go towards patching up the problems created by the government, Mr Burnham adds.

  55. What is the slavery bill hoping to do?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Modern Slavery Bill increases the punishments for slavery crimes, up to a maximum life sentence.

    It will create an anti-slavery commissioner with responsibility to improve responses, including a more co-ordinated police response.

    Authorities would be given the powers to stop vessels where slaves are suspected of being held or trafficked.

    The bill also gives courts new powers to order perpetrators of slavery and trafficking to pay compensation.

  56. Respect for patients

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final pillar is to nurture respect for every NHS patient, Mr Hunt says, "the most important and hardest pillar of all".

    In the next few months new training will be announced for doctors and nurses. Issues concerning whistle blowing and the ability to speak out about poor care will also be improved.

  57. Paperless NHS

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The third pillar is to embrace innovating and eliminate waste, Jeremy Hunt says. The NHS is making good progress on becoming paperless.

    To access £1.5bn of funding for frontline activity, hospitals must show how they will be more efficient and sustainable, and deliver their commitment to a paperless NHS by 2018.

    From next year CCG will be required to keep more detailed financial records, including per patient costing, Mr Hunt says. While Local Authorities and CCG's will be given detailed "indicative" budgets as soon as possible after the next spending review to create a more stable financial situation, he adds.

  58. Post update

    @GavinBarwellMP

    Gavin Barwell MP tweets: In the Commons listening to Jeremy Hunt announce extra funding for our precious NHS including for new primary care infrastructure #Croydon

  59. Care models

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Hunt says the second pillar is to change the models of care to reflect the need of an ageing population.

    A £1bn investment fund in primary and community care facilities will pay for new surgeries and services over the next four years; while £200m will be made available to pilot new models of care.

  60. Child exploitation offence

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Doocey is introducing an amendment which would introduce a specific offence of child exploitation into the Modern Slavery Bill.

    She claims that, at present, some people who are forcing children to work cannot be prosecuted if they were not responsible for trafficking the child.

    "A child cannot consent to her own exploitation," she argues.

    Baroness Doocey
  61. NHS support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Hunt says the first pillar of the government's plan is to ensure the UK has an economy that can support the NHS.

    New plans announced in the Autumn Statement will mean the NHS can receive greater funding without the need for increased housing taxes, as proposed by Labour, he says.

  62. Health funding

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    After a mammoth one and a half hour statement on the government's road plans, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, is now at the depatch box making a statement on funds for the NHS.

    On Sunday, George Osborne announced an extra £2bn funding for frontline health services. £1.3bn of the £2bn is expected to come from savings in other government departments. £700m of the extra funding for frontline services will come from the Department of Health's budget.

    NHS Chief Executive Simon Stevens recently said the NHS would need £8bn further funding by 2020.

  63. Health Secretary in Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons
    Image caption: Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, second from right, is in the House of Commons ahead of his statement on delivering the NHS five year forward view
  64. Questions continue

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    There's still a dozen or so MPs, almost all Conservatives, seeking to put questions to Patrick McLoughlin about the government's announced road plan.

    Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt's statement on an extra £2bn funding for frontline health services, announced by George Osborne on Sunday, will now be heard closer to 16.45 GMT.

  65. Post update

    @AngusMacNeilMP

    SNP MP Angus B MacNeil tweets: A Tory MP has just told #Commons that his constituents have been in "a traffic jam for 30yrs" ..traffic may be bad in UK but a 30yr jam! :)

  66. Concerns on other roads

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Laurence Robertson asks if today's announcement includes an allocation of money to address congestion and the "death rate" on the A417/8 in Gloucestershire.

    Mr McLoughlin says options are starting to be looked out. The scheme is not "an easy or a straight forward one", he says.

  67. Hull rail line

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Diana Johnson asks when the privately financed "electrification of the line to Hull" will be announced, which she claims is "desperately needed".

    Mr McLoughlin says he has already made several statements on the rail line.

  68. Holiday cheer?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Tessa Munt welcomes the announced changes to the A303 but asks Mr McLoughlin if he will talk to the Chancellor about cutting VAT on tourism as well - to allow the West Country to compete with other European holiday destinations.

    Mr McLoughlin says VAT cuts don't come under his portfolio and is an area he should "tread lightly".

  69. Road relief

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat MP Sir Alan Beith, says he welcomes the announcement of plans to dual the A1 - which may be an understatement given he has campaigned for the route campaign for for 40 years. His party will keep Mr McLouglin to his promises and wants dualling all the way from Newcastle to Edinburgh, he says.

    Mr McLoughlin thanks Sir Alan for his support and says many MPs campaigned for the dualling.

  70. Tunnel trouble

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    New UKIP MP, Mark Reckless, says that costs for the Medway tunnel fall on local council tax payers. He asks whether this is fair given that almost every other tunnel is part of the strategic road network, and so funded by the Highways agency.

    Mr McLoughlin says that this is the first time Mr Reckless has raised this issue, despite being the Conservative MP for his constituency for several years. He asks for Mr Reckless to write to him on the matter.

  71. Benefits for south west

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ben Bradshaw, the Labour MP, says that in 1996 the the Conservatives made the same announcement about the A303. Investment should instead be focussed on "tackling the vulnerability" of rail links, which he says would help the south west most.

    Mr McLoughlin says Labour was in power for 13 years after 1996 where he accuses Mr Bradshaw of failing to do anything "for his [the south west]" in that time. The government is also looking at rail links but announcements made today will do a lot for the benefit of the south west, he says.

  72. Amendment withdrawn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rosser withdraws Labour's amendment to the Modern Slavery Bill requiring courts to take into account what is best for the victim of slavery.

    He argues that the bill "could be improved" and says he is disappointed that ministers have not added a requirement to consider victims.

    Unlike in the Commons, amendments are rarely pushed to a vote at committee stage in the House of Lords, though peers reserve the right to introduce amendments at report stage if they feel ministers have not addressed their concerns.

  73. Transport hub

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Patrick McLoughlin
    Image caption: Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin is responding to questions on the government's road plan, announced today, from backbench MPs.
  74. New initiatives?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Transport Committee, Labour's Louise Ellman, says this is a "renewed announcement". And she complains that "62% of transformational infrastructure" remains in London.

    Mr McLoughlin says this announcements adds flesh to the bones of earlier ones. There is a good "spread" of investment across the country, he adds.

  75. Right direction

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to Mr Dugher's comment Patrick McLaughlin says that he welcomes Labour's support for the strategy through the "rant".

    Since 2010 the government has completed eight of Labour's road schemes, he says and a further six started by the current government, he says.

  76. Easing congestion?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Dugher says Labour supports proposals to ease congestion on the roads, but will be looking at the detail of the government's proposals carefully.

    He asks why the government won't support Labour's plan for a national infrastructure commission. He tells MPs that the previous Labour administration spent £94bn on roads.

    This announcement is a calculated pre-election move, he says.

  77. 'Regard for victims'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are considering a proposed Labour clause to the Modern Slavery Bill, which would oblige the courts to have "regard to the best interests of a victim of slavery, trafficking and exploitation".

    Home Office Minister Lord Bates says that the bill as it stands has regard for victims, without the need for the Labour amendment.

    He says ministers listened and made changes to the bill in the Commons, including the creation of "child advocates".

  78. Post update

    @politicshome

    PoliticsHome ‏tweets: Dugher says if the original builders on Stonehenge were as slow as the Govt, "we'd still be waiting for the first stone 4,500 years later"

  79. Traffic jam on announcements?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Transport Secretary Michael Dugher is now responding to the statement for Labour, he says that this announcement is a "re-announcement" and more about "upgrading of the government's press releases" than about "upgrading roads".

  80. Post update

    @cripeswatson

    Sean Curran

    Parliamentary correspondent, BBC News

    motorway quality journeys ?

  81. Norwich relief

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In East Anglia, 30 miles of dual carriageway will be built around Norwich, Mr McLoughlin says. Meanwhile an "express standard" road will be built between Cambridge and Milton Keynes.

  82. Stonehenge tunnel

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr McLoughlin says in the South West transport needs have been neglected.

    "Motorway quality journeys" will be brought to the A303, he says. And £2bn of investment will be put into the road, and a 1.8 mile tunnel will be built near Stonehenge.

  83. Post update

    ‏@IsabelHardman

    The Spectator's Isabel Hardman tweets: Can't take pix in Commons but if you want to know balance of constituencies that will benefit from today's roads £, Tory benches pretty busy

  84. Traffic woes

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Patrick McLoughlin says road infrastructure needs to improve. Motorways are busier than ever, traffic increasing by nearly 50% over the last 20 years, while traffic across all roads has nearly doubled since 1976, he says.

  85. Road network improvements

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin is now at the despatch box, setting out the government's road plan.

    The government is investing £15bn into 100 road improvement schemes and 1,300 new miles of extra lanes.

    New projects include a tunnel at Stonehenge, an upgrade to parts of the A1 and better links to the Port of Liverpool.

    Improvements will also be made to the M42 to the east of Birmingham and the M62 between Manchester and Leeds.

  86. Teacher recruitment

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The government is attacked again by Labour on their teacher recruitment record, this time by shadow education minster Kevan Brennan.

    Recruitment for teacher training is down on its 2010 levels and head teachers are having to travel abroad to recruit, he tells MPs. He accuses the government of "cold complacency".

    Education Secretary Nicky Morgan says figures are relatively stable. One of the things attracting people to take up teaching is a strong economy, she says. Labour's policies on education would simply put teachers off, she adds.

  87. Free school success?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Julie Hilling questions the government's claims that free schools are "outperforming" all other state schools.

    By the Department of Education's own admission only a small number of free schools have been inspected, and their findings cannot be interpreted as a "balanced view of education nationally", she says.

    Education Minister Nick Gibb says that though some free schools are too new to be inspected, 24% of those that have been inspected have been rated "outstanding" - far above the national average - despite the "tougher framework" now applied by Ofsted.

  88. Modern Slavery Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lords questions are over and peers move on to consider the Modern Slavery Bill.

    Today is the first of four days of committee stage debate on the bill.

    Opening the debate, shadow home affairs spokesman Lord Rosser introduces a new clause which, he says, would oblige the courts "to have regard to the best interests" of victims of trafficking and slavery.

    He argues that the bill as it stands does not go far enough in supporting victims and there should be "a commitment to a minimum level of support".

  89. Labour attack

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    During a series of exchanges shadow education secretary Tristram Hunt calls on Nicky Morgan to support Labour's plans to require private schools to work alongside state schools.

    He accuses her of being scared to take on the "vested interests" in the education sector that allow an educational "apartheid" to continue.

    The education secretary says that many schools area already doing what Mr Hunt is calling for. Mr Hunt's former school, the privately funded University College School, won't be building any statues to him any time soon, she suggests.

  90. Time for confetti?

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Baroness Butler-Sloss argues that, given that same-sex marriage is now permitted, there should not be an obstacle to humanist marriage.

    "We have so changed the concept of marriage that I cannot understand why we are not just getting on with it," she says.

    Lord Ashton of Hyde says he does not agree that ministers are "being slow" to address the issue.

  91. Private schools - beneficial or bust?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Ian Lucas asks Nicky Morgan if she accepts Chief Inspector of Schools in England and head of Ofsted Sir Michael Wilshaw's assessment that private schools only offer "crumbs from the table" to state schools.

    Avoiding answering the question directly, the Education Secretary says she has had a number of discussions with Sir Michael.

    She adds that a number of private schools already have beneficial relationships with state schools in their areas and contribute an estimated £9.5bn per annum to the UK economy. Eleven state academies sponsored by private schools have been approved to date, she adds.

  92. Humanist marriage question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Harrison has the fourth and final Lords question, asking ministers when they intend to publish a response to their consultation on humanist marriage.

    A government consultation on "marriages by non-religious belief organisations" concluded in September.

    Justice spokesman Lord Ashton of Hyde tells the House that the government has promised to respond by January 2015.

  93. Recruitment targets missed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Bill Esterson says the government has missed its teacher recruitment targets for the last three years, leading to "a crisis" in key subjects and leadership roles in schools across the country.

    Education Minster David Laws admits that there are "challenges" recruiting for core scientific subjects, and the government has increased bursaries for these areas to address this. More outstanding graduates are now being attracted to teaching, he tells MPs.

  94. Third Lords question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Fittingly for World Aids Day, the third questions in the Lords is also on the subject of HIV/Aids.

    Shadow international development spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury asks what progress there has been in developing a vaccine in order effectively to address global HIV/Aids.

    International development spokeswoman Baroness Northover says progress on a vaccine has been slow, though there have been advances in treatments.

  95. Nursery school staff salaries

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour education minister Alison McGovern says pay for nursery school staff went up pay "barely 1%" last year. Without increased pay for teachers, improvements in nursery provisions will be hard to come by, she tells MPs, and asks what the government plans to do to improve salaries.

    Education Minister Sam Gyimah says he doesn't recognise Ms McGovern's claim. Pay for nursery teachers has gone up according to figures he's seen, Mr Gyimah says. The government are focussing on cutting taxes to allow teachers to keep more of the wages, he adds.

  96. Peers' questions

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Earl Howe is answering for the government on the subject of HIV prevention.

    Earl Howe
  97. Post update

    @HBaldwinMP

    Conservative MP Harriett Baldwin ‏tweets: Only about 20 @UKLabour MPs have shown up to support @TristramHuntMP at Education Questions and no #UKIP MPs have bothered to attend either.

  98. Responsibility for HIV awareness

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Health Minister Earl Howe tells peers that "we should all take responsibility for reducing HIV transmission".

    He adds: "Those who feel they are at risk should take an HIV test."

  99. Second Lords question

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Continuing on the theme of HIV, Labour peer Baroness Prosser asks the government what action they will take in 2015 to support a reduction in late HIV diagnoses in England.

  100. Adding up

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In response to a question from Conservative MP Neil Carmichael, Nicky Morgan tells MPs that maths is now "the most popular A-level" - in the sense that more students are taking maths A-levels than any other type of A-Level.

    Nicky Morgan
  101. World Aids Day awareness

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Brinton praises Prince Harry for making a "brave statement" in connection with the #FeelNoShame campaign on World Aids Day.

    Speaking earlier, Prince Harry confessed a secret from his personal life - that he has a fear of public speaking.

    "I get incredibly nervous before public speaking, no matter how big the crowd or the audience," the Prince is reported to have said.

  102. Government support

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Education Secretary Nicky Morgan is now at the despatch box.

    Responding to a question from Labour MP Stephen Timms - who says that the careers provisions in English Schools are in a "shameful state" - she tells MPs that the government is supporting a number of schemes to improve careers provisions in schools for girls, including the Your Life campaign aimed at "showing that science and maths can lead to exciting careers".

    Career choices should "not be closed off for anyone", she tells MPs.

  103. Post update

    ‏@LabourRoyall

    Labour's leader in the Lords, Janet Royall tweets: Mixed messaging via @LabourLordsUK @BD_Lawrence terrific blog on modern slavery

  104. HIV stigma

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Baroness Gould of Potternewton asks the first question to the government, on what plans ministers have to develop a campaign to address HIV stigma.

    She asks if addressing HIV stigma will be given a profile similar to the Time to Change campaign aimed at ending the stigma around mental health.

  105. Post update

    @SarahChampionMP

    Labour MP Sarah Champion tweets: @KeeleyMP rightly asks what the Government is doing to support young carers in education

  106. Lords questions begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Business in the Lords is getting underway, with an announcement of the death of Baroness James of Holland Park.

    The Conservative peer was also known as the successful novelist PD James.

  107. Pupil absence

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Marcus Jones kicks off the day's business asking what is being done to reduce pupil absence from schools,

    Education Minster Nick Gibb says that school absences are at the "lowest number since records began".

    Education Minster Nick Gibb
  108. Kicking off the day

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    But before the Commons begins its main business, MPs are putting questions to Education Secretary Nicky Morgan, and her ministerial team at 14.30 GMT.

    Debate is expected to focus on funding for free school meals in primary schools, the performance of free schools and the public benefit contributed by schools in the private sector.

  109. Today in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Business in the Lords is about to begin with the regular question session with government ministers.

    The main business will be the committee stage of the Modern Slavery Bill. The bill consolidates the current offences relating to trafficking and slavery, and creates new offences including child trafficking and exploitation.

    After 16.45 GMT, Health Minister Earl Howe will repeat a Commons statement on the government's plans for the NHS.

    There will also be a short debate on the report of an all-party inquiry into electoral conduct.

  110. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Today's final business at around 22.00 GMT will be the adjournment debate on the jurisdiction of the Serious Fraud Office and 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup bids.

    The debate will be led by Conservative MP Damian Collins, a former member of the Culture Committee, who has long taken an interest in the running of football.

  111. Chinese relations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Foreign Affairs Committee Chair, Sir Richard Ottaway, is applying for an emergency debate, after the Chinese embassy denied the committee visas for its planned trip to Hong Kong.

    His committee is examining relations between the UK and its former colony, where pro-democracy activists have been protesting since September.

    The demonstrators want elections free from interference by Beijing.

    Sir Richard has accused the Chinese authorities of acting in an "overtly confrontational manner".

  112. Judicial review battle ahead

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The main legislation will be Consideration of Lords amendments to the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill.

    This is an example of the famous ritual of Parliamentary ping-pong, in which legislation re-written by one House is sent to the other, so that the changes can be accepted or rejected.

    In this case, the government suffered three major defeats in the Lords over plans to curtail the use of judicial review - one amendment was won by 66 votes, which may incline peers to stick to their guns on that particular point. The Commons response to this is hugely significant, given the widespread outrage at the proposed changes from lawyers and campaign groups alike.

  113. Good afternoon

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Hello and welcome to today's rolling coverage of the day's events in Parliament as they happen.

    There are two big statements today. The first from Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin will announce new road infrastructure plans as part of a £15bn "roads revolution" for England.

    The money - initially announced in 2013 - will involve 100 road improvement schemes and add 1,300 new miles of extra lanes to motorways and A-roads.

    Following that, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt will set out the government's plans to put an extra £2bn into frontline health services across the UK.