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Summary

  1. Former US president Bill Clinton is in Northern Ireland to mark the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement
  2. The agreement helped bring an end to 30 years of sectarian conflict, known as the Troubles
  3. Key players involved in the deal - including ex prime ministers Tony Blair and Bertie Ahern - are also in Belfast
  4. Former US Senator George Mitchell, who chaired the talks, says NI still has far to travel

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

  1. And it ends with a plaque...

    And that concludes our live coverage of the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. A day when a former president and a former US senator joined some of the main players in the Northern Ireland peace process for a unique anniversary.

    Bill Clinton and George Mitchell at the Ulster Hall in Belfast
  2. Clinton: A 'privilege to be part of journey to peace'

    On receiving the Freedom of the City of Belfast, President Bill Clinton told an audience at the Ulster Hall that over the last 23 years he's fallen in love with the city.

    Bill Clinton at the Ulster Hall in Belfast

    President Clinton added: "The people of Belfast and Northern Ireland have a special place in my heart, and it remains one of the great privileges of my life that I could be part of their journey toward peace."

  3. Mitchell 'honoured' by award

    Senator Mitchell has said he has come to greatly admire the people of Northern Ireland. He was speaking after the Freedom of the City of Belfast was conferred on him and President Bill Clinton.

    George Mitchell speaking at the Ulster Hall in Belfast

    He said: "It is an honour for me to receive the Freedom of the City of Belfast, especially in the company of President Bill Clinton. It was he who asked me to come to Northern Ireland as his representative when I retired from the US Senate; the resulting experience changed my life."

  4. The selfie of all selfies!

    Belfast's Lord Mayor Nuala McAllister gets a very memorable pic with the latest freemen of the city.

    Bill Clinton, George Mitchell and Nuala McAllister
  5. President and senator become freemen of Belfast

    A ceremony has been held in the Ulster Hall to confer the Freedom of the City of Belfast on former US President Bill Clinton and ex-US Senator George Mitchell.

    Bill Clinton

    The two American politicians are in Belfast to mark the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Good Friday Agreement, and received the honour in recognition of their services to peace in Northern Ireland.

    President Bill Clinton and Senator George Mitchell
  6. And they've arrived!

    President Bill Clinton and Senator George Mitchell arrive at Belfast's Ulster Hall...

    Bill Clinton and George Mitchell at the Ulster Hall
  7. Ready and waiting at the Ulster Hall

    The stage is set at the Ulster Hall for a warm welcome for former US President Bill Clinton and Senator George Mitchell - they are about to be awarded the Freedom of the City of Belfast.

    Ulster Hall
  8. Agreement anniversary a 'celebration of failure'

    The TUV leader, Jim Allister, who voted against the Good Friday Agreement, says today's 20th anniversary is a "celebration of failure".

    TUV leader Jim Allister
    Image caption: TUV leader Jim Allister

    He told BBC News NI: "It (the agreement) was based on a totally immoral foundation, which was about rewarding terrorism. The greatest manifestation of that was to throw open the doors of the prisons and to release, onto the streets, the most vicious, cold-blooded murderers ever seen."

  9. Adams: 'We were on the right road'

    Former Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams describes how he knew the Good Friday Agreement would be embraced by the majority of people. He was speaking at Queen's earlier today.

    Video content

    Video caption: Gerry Adams describes how he knew the 1998 peace agreement would be accepted
  10. Ahern: Art of politics is compromise

    One of the key architects of the Good Friday peace plan, Bertie Ahern, says "the art of politics is compromise and that you can't make progress without compromise."

    Former Taoiseach Bertie Ahern

    Speaking at Queen's University, Mr Ahern also referred to the current problems in the political process.

    "I know that the civil servants running Northern Ireland at the moment are all brilliant people... but we know there are hundreds of decisions not being dealt with because of the stalemate, so isn't that a good reason to try and end it? I wish you well in doing it."

  11. Holding back the years?

    From then to now.... the key architects of the 1998 peace plan reflect on its legacy 20 years on. Read more here.

    Tony Blair, Bertie Ahern and Bill Clinton