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Summary

  1. Updates on Sunday 12 June 2016
  2. More news, sport, travel and weather from 08:00 on Monday

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

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  1. Our live coverage for the EU referendum debate

    Live updates for BBC Spotlight's EU referendum debate have finished, but we'll be back at 08:00 on Monday with the latest news, sport, travel and weather for Devon and Cornwall.

  2. EU referendum: Key points from the panel

    Chris Ellis

    BBC News Online

    Panel
    • Sir Tim Smit: "I fear the vote that is about to take place could represent the greatest betrayal of the young by the old that has ever taken place."
    • Ben Bradshaw: "Three positive reasons for staying in - peace, prosperity and power."
    • Tim Martin: "It's a vote for democracy if you vote to leave."
    • Anne Marie Morris: "We are bound by regulation, out fishermen are constrained on where they can fish, and our farmers are strangled by the Common Agricultural Policy". 
    Audience
  3. Where does EU money go?

    Reality Check

    EU budget

    Here's a guide to what happens to the funds the 28 member states contribute to the EU budget.

    Read the full Reality Check here.

  4. The main topics: Consumer affairs

    Chris Ellis

    BBC News Online

    This issue covers pricing, safety testing and ensuring customers are treated fairly.

    Main views to leave:

    • EU red tape makes goods and services more expensive
    • The recent row over the “tampon tax” shows the EU has too much power, Britain should be able to set VAT rates itself
    • Consumer protection laws existed before the EU and would remain after Britain left
    Tampons

    Main views to remain:

    • People in Britain save an average of £450 a year because prices are lower as a result of EU membership
    • Flights and mobile phone charges are among the goods and services that are cheaper
    • The EU ensures that imported goods meet European quality standards
  5. The main topics: Education and research

    Chris Ellis

    BBC News Online

    How education and scientific, technical and medical research relate to membership.  

    Main views to remain:

    • UK universities receive millions in research funding from the EU
    • Many of the UK's top scientists come from elsewhere in Europe with the help of EU grants
    • The Erasmus programme allows British students to study abroad
    Education

    Main views to leave: 

    • Only 3% of total R&D spending in Britain is funded by the EU
    • The UK will be able to increase funding to science out of savings from not paying for EU membership
    • Britain could set its own immigration policy which could fast track scientists and graduates
  6. Who works for EU and what do they earn?

    Reality Check

    The question: Alistair asks BBC Radio 4's PM programme: "How many people does the EU employ, and what is their average salary?"

    Salary

    Reality Check verdict: 55,000 people are employed by the EU. Most of these people work for the European Commission. Salaries can range from €2,400 (£1,856) to €18,000 (£13,922) per month.

    Read the full Reality Check here.

  7. The main topics: Travel and living abroad

    Chris Ellis

    BBC News Online

    This issue covers travel for leisure or work, and living in other EU countries.

    Main views to leave: 

    • There is no reason that leaving the EU would make it harder to go on holiday in Europe
    • International law means current expats could not be forced to return to the UK
    • The UK has deals with lots of other countries to help Britons living abroad
    Plane

    Main views to remain:

    • Flights to Europe and using mobile phones on holiday are cheaper thanks to the EU
    • British tourists enjoy free or cheaper healthcare in other EU countries
    • There is no guarantee that expats in the EU would be able to stay after Brexit
  8. Would Brexit add two years to austerity?

    Reality Check

    The claim: The economic impact of leaving the European Union would lead to a loss of £20bn to £40bn from the public finances, extending austerity by a further two years, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies.

    Austerity

    Reality Check verdict: The relationship between Brexit and the public finances may not be exactly as described. But if - like them - you accept predictions that leaving the EU would cut economic growth, it is hard to imagine that would not hit the public finances. Such a scenario would require spending to be cut further, taxes to be increased or the period of austerity to be extended.

    Read the full Reality Check here.

  9. The main topics: Trade and economy

    Chris Ellis

    BBC News Online

    How trade and the UK's economy are affected by membership of the EU.  

    Main views to remain:

    • Brexit would cause an economic shock and growth would be slower
    • As a share of exports Britain is more dependent on the rest of the EU than they are on us
    • The UK would still have to apply EU rules to retain access to the single market

    Main views to leave:

    • UK companies would be freed from the burden of EU regulation
    • Trade with EU countries would continue because we import more from them than we export to them
    • Britain would be able to negotiate its own trade deals with other countries
  10. Farming: EU would 'lead changes to help agriculture from government ignorance'

    Andrew Segal

    Local Live

    Remaining within the European Union would help British agriculture and farming because "the British Government has been fantastically ignorant and unsupportive of British farming, said Eden Project founder Sir Tim Smit.

    Tractor

    Although saying "pains me to say it", he added "It's not thriving under central government whatsoever. I think some change is necessary, and I'm more persuaded that remaining in the EU would lead to that." 

  11. Farming: Leaving EU 'could help farmers by looking for more markets'

    Andrew Segal

    Local Live

    Losing some markets within the European Union could help farmers look elsewhere for other opportunities to sell and help them do "very well", Leave campaigner and Wetherspoons boss Tim Martin, says.

    Cows. Pic: Andrew Segal

    He said: "If you speak to New Zealand, who lost most of their markets over here when the UK joined the EU, they strongly feel it's been a shot in the arm to them because it's forced them to look at the world market, and they've done really very well."

  12. Has EU money worked in the South West?

    Neil Gallacher, Business & Industry Correspondent

    BBC Spotlight

    It's impossible to demonstrate that Cornwall's exceptionally high levels of regional aid have done much to turn the local economy around.

    Back in 2000, it was often said that Objective One was the only shot Cornwall would get at top-level European grant funding. So, six years later, it came as quite a surprise when the county's key economic measure (output per head) was still so low by EU standards that Cornwall qualified for a further six years of funding. 

    And six years after that, it came as a further surprise when the county was once again deemed so poor as to need a third round of top-level assistance. 

    Some argue EU grant assistance is too blunt a instrument to effect proper change. But there are other explanations. One is that the schemes developed may just need longer to come to fruition and grow the local economy. It is also possible that, without the funding Cornwall has had, the local economy might have been far more badly hit by the years of the global financial crisis - nobody can say for sure.

  13. What sort of things has EU money been spent on?

    Neil Gallacher, Business & Industry Correspondent

    BBC Spotlight

    • Big capital developments such as the Penryn University Campus, the Eden Project, and Davidstow Creamery
    • Improvements to infrastructure such as superfast broadband and the expansion of Newquay Airport
    • High-tech and green projects, including innovation centres and renewable energy schemes
    • People-focused developments, such as skills training and business support.

    Some money, notably in the early years, went on projects that hit the headlines when they ran into difficulties, such as South West Film Studios at St Agnes and the Gaia Energy Centre at Delabole.

  14. Economy: EU has 'kept peace and security'

    Andrew Segal

    Local Live

    The European Union and European co-operation has helped keep peace in the continent for may decades, Remain campaigner and Exeter Labour MP Ben Bradsaw says.

    Ben Bradsaw

    He said: "My father was at Dunkirk. He lost a lot of friends and comrades. He was one of those who helped build the institutions after the Second World War because he said: 'Never again'. The history of Europe for hundreds of years was mutual slaughter. We cannot throw away the peace and security we have just like that."

  15. How unusual are Cornwall's 'Euro-millions' of regional aid, by British standards?

    Neil Gallacher, Business & Industry Correspondent

    BBC Spotlight

    Very - and they reflect the low earnings of the far South West.  

    According to a 2012 report from the think tank Open Europe, Cornwall - because of this regional aid - is one of only two places in Britain where the local community can claim to be a net recipient of EU funding, the other being West Wales.

    Britain as a whole is a net contributor to EU funds.  And Open Europe said that although Cornwall was a net beneficiary, Devon - given its lower level of EU funding - was a net contributor to EU funds, like the rest of the country.

    Cornwall