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Live Reporting

By Dulcie Lee and Suzanne Leigh

All times stated are UK

  1. What happened today?

    Jeremy Corbyn, Nicola Sturgeon, Boris Johnson, Jo Swinson and Nigel Farage
    Image caption: Jeremy Corbyn, Nicola Sturgeon, Boris Johnson, Jo Swinson and Nigel Farage

    We're finishing our Live coverage for now.

    Politicians have taken to social media and the airwaves to promote their parties ahead of next month's election.

    • Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage said he would not stand as a candidate in next month's general election, opting to "service the cause better" by supporting his party's 600 candidates. Read the story in full here.
    • Boris Johnson ruled out a pact with any other party and expressed "deep regret" over missing the Brexit deadline of 31 October.
    • Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson said the prime minister "only had himself to blame" for missing the 31 October deadline.
    • Scotland's first minister and SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon called for a second referendum on Scottish independence next year.
    • Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn hit the campaign trail promoting his new pledge to renovate homes with energy-saving upgrades.
    • And Labour's shadow chancellor John McDonnell said he did not believe Donald Trump's assurances that he is not looking for the NHS to be part of a future trade deal.

    That's all from us for now, but you can keep up to date with all the news about the election here.

  2. What are the parties doing on social media?

    The election period may not have officially started, but parties are already getting adverts out to potential supporters on social media.

    On Facebook, the Conservatives have started a second geographically targeted campaign, covering 26 constituencies.

    It covers a mix of seats where the Tories were a close second in 2017 and those where the party currently have fairly safe majorities.

    The Labour Party also has a new campaign promoting an article in the Guardian, alongside the caption: “Boris Johnson’s disastrous Brexit would sell off our NHS to Donald Trump. The NHS says that means skyrocketing costs for life-saving medicines."

    Labour advert on NHS

    The Lib Dems have two new campaigns - one about the changes the party would bring if elected and the other attacking Jeremy Corbyn.

    There are nine versions of the advert on Mr Corbyn with a different message on each image.

    Lib Dem advert
  3. Climate change 'big part of Labour's campaign' - Corbyn

    Jeremy Corbyn

    Jeremy Corbyn says climate change will be a big part of his campaign.

    Speaking to reporters as he campaigns in Putney, he says: "The green industrial revolution, which we're promoting, will retrofit homes, will create a sustainable energy network in this country, will be a massive contribution of what we've signed up to through the Paris climate change accord.

    "It's going to be a big part of it but it's also about land use and farming policies. We cannot go on polluting our planet.

    "We cannot go on standing by while climate warming increases, we cannot go on seeing our biodiversity destroyed and diminished."

    Read about Labour's plans to upgrade homes and cut carbon emissions here.

  4. Corbyn out and about campaigning

    Jeremy Corbyn campaigning in Wandsworth

    Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is out and about campaigning in Wandsworth, London.

    Speaking about the party's before the election period officially begins, he tells one supporter: "The numbers of people coming out are bigger than in 2017 at the same stage of the campaign."

  5. How much of a threat is the Brexit Party to Tory seats?

    BBC News Channel

    Matthew Goodwin, professor of politics at Kent University, says if Brexit Party candidates were to take "anywhere as little at 5-6% of the vote" that would have a "significant impact" on Boris Johnson's ability to win a majority.

    But in what sort of seats might the Brexit Party be a particular threat to the Conservatives?

    "I imagine Brexit Party will not stand candidates against ERG [pro-Brexit European Research Group] Eurosceptic politicians within the Conservative Party," says Prof Goodwin.

    This would mark a return to UKIP's strategy in 2010 when they didn't stand candidates against politicians who wanted a referendum on the UK's EU membership, he says.

    "If they then were to stand candidates in those all-important marginal seats, where the Conservatives are only a few points behind the Labour Party, that is going to cause a big problem for Boris Johnson."

  6. Who has selected the most women as candidates?

    Women MPs standing in Parliament

    Most sides have pledged to make their candidates more representative, including bringing more women into the race.

    However, with the deadline for selections just two weeks away on 14 November, the parties' record in selecting women is mixed - with Labour picking more women, while the Conservatives choose more men.

    Read the full story here.

  7. Tory MP not standing in election cites Brexit 'conflict'

    Margot James

    Former minister Margot James announces she will not stand in next month's general election.

    The Stourbridge MP was one of 21 Conservative rebels who were removed from the parliamentary party after voting against the government to back a bill designed to stop a no-deal Brexit.

    In her resignation letter, Ms James says she welcomed the return of the whip last week and had wanted to continue in Parliament.

    But, as an active campaigner for Remain, she was at odds with her constituency, where 64% of voters backed Brexit.

    "I realised that I needed to bring the three-and-a-half-year conflict between the result of the referendum in my constituency, and my own view of where the future interests of the country lie to a close," she writes.

    Read the story in full here.

  8. Get involved in tracking party ads on social media

    Forget the doorstep, political parties vying for seats in next month's poll will be banking on social media to reach thousands of potential voters.

    You can help the BBC track campaign ads, as technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones and economics editor Faisal Islam explain:

    View more on twitter
  9. Johnson rules out independence referendum deal

    Boris Johnson

    Boris Johnson has ruled out granting permission for a second vote on Scottish independence while he is prime minister.

    He told Sky's Sophy Ridge the issue had been settled in a "once-in-a-generation" vote in 2014.

    But SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon described the position of blocking another independence referendum as "unsustainable".

    Read the full story here.

  10. Farage feet first with union flag socks

    You've heard of "wearing your heart on your sleeve", what about wearing your politics on your... feet?

    Nigel Farage was snapped on the Andrew Marr show sporting union flag socks:

    Nigel Farage socks

    And it's not the first time the Brexit Party leader has appeared on the show in that get-up. Here's another photo dug out of the archives, from 2017:

    Nigel Farage's socks from 2017
  11. Is Farage making life harder for Johnson by not standing?

    Jessica Parker

    BBC political correspondent

    Political opponents of Nigel Farage will accuse him of running scared after he said he would not stand as a candidate in December's poll.

    They will suggest he's not going to run because he thinks he's not going to win.

    But the flip side is that rather than concentrating on one constituency where he personally might try and win, Mr Farage is making it clear he's going to try and make Boris Johnson's life pretty difficult.

    That's if this so-called Leave alliance doesn't happen - and it doesn't look like it will.

    The Brexit Party leader has made it clear he has no interest in getting on board with Mr Johnson's deal at all.

    It's likely Mr Farage will spend a lot of the campaign really criticising it, whereas the Tory Party leader will say he's got an oven-ready deal to present and get through Parliament within weeks.

  12. What's happened so far this morning?

    We've had a plethora of politicians pitching to the electorate this morning as the UK gears up for a general election.

    Prime minister Boris Johnson ruled out a pact with any other party, expressed "deep regret" over missing the Brexit deadline of 31 October, and said negotiating a future trade deal with the EU should be "extremely simple" given the close relationship between the UK and the bloc.

    Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson said the prime minister "only had himself to blame" for missing the deadline, saying his previous "do or die" promise was "stupid".

    Meanwhile, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage said he would not stand as a candidate in next month's general election, adding that he will still "hope and pray" for a some form of "Leave alliance".

    Scotland's first minister and SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said there was nothing inevitable about the "mess" Brexit has become, and said she wants a second referendum on Scottish independence next year.

    Labour's shadow chancellor John McDonnell said he did not believe Donald Trump's assurances that he is not looking for the NHS to be part of a future trade deal.

  13. Could snow delay the election?

    And your other questions answered.

    Christmas tree outside No. 10

    What happens if bad weather affects turnout? Or if the election returns a hung parliament? How much will this election cost?

    We answer these and other questions sent in by readers.

  14. Will tactical voting play a part in December's poll?

    People counting votes

    Last month, the Electoral Reform Society campaign group asked polling company BMG Research to find out how widespread tactical voting might be.

    Of 1,500 voters questioned, 24% said they planned to vote tactically to keep out a candidate they dislike.

    That compares with 66% who said they would vote for their first preference - regardless of how likely they were to win. The remaining 10% said they didn't know.

    Find out more about what tactical voting is and whether it actually works here.

  15. Watch: How do I register to vote?

    Video content

    Video caption: General election 2019: How do I register to vote?
  16. A really simple guide to the election

    Did the morning's politics shows leave you with any questions?

    Why have an election now? How are the winners chosen? When do we find out the result?

    Head to our really simple guide to the general election for the answers.