BBC News

Britain's part-time islands

Phil Coomes
Picture editor

Published
image copyrightMikey Boardman

The coast of Britain has long drawn artists who look to capture the majesty of the sea or perhaps use the flat surface of the water as a metaphor. But others look to the shores to see how the tides shape the lives of those who live beside it.

Mikey Boardman, an aspiring British landscape photographer, currently studying for a degree in photography at Blackburn University, is one of those, taking as his theme the many tidal islands around the coast.

These small pieces of land are cut off from the mainland twice a day.

"I found that only a short journey from the suburban environment can give a sense of travelling to a far-off, remote destination," says Boardman. "The surrounding water inflicts a complete sense of isolation, yet still a form of escapism, which I embraced."

image copyrightMikey Boardman

Taking care not to find himself cut off due to the changing tide, Boardman visited a number of locations, including Hilbre Island in West Kirby, Ynys Llanddwyn off the coast of Anglesey and Piel Island in Cumbria.

Boardman works on film, loading his Hasselblad with Ilford FP4.

"I am often asked why do I not choose to use digital equipment, and where I do acknowledge the convenience and speed of modern technologies, for me I do not know where the digital image exists," he says.

"I believe a photograph cannot exist unless it appears as a physical object, negative or print.

"I also enjoy working in a slow, methodical way, taking time processing my film and working in a darkroom.

"My photographs are objects about things."

Here is a selection of pictures from the series.

image copyrightMikey Boardman
image copyrightMikey Boardman
image copyrightMikey Boardman
image copyrightMikey Boardman
image copyrightMikey Boardman
image copyrightMikey Boardman

Related Topics

  • Documentary photography
  • Coasts
  • Photography