In pictures: The Blood Forest

A man's face is projected on to the Brazilian rainforest canopy Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features

Photographer and street artist Philippe Echaroux has created a powerful series of images to highlight the issue of illegal logging and continuing deforestation of the Amazon rainforest.

Sources show a recent increase in this activity, despite efforts by the Brazilian government to curb it.

Working alongside the Paiter Surui people of western Brazil, Echaroux created these spectral images by projecting large scale portraits of the indigenous community on to foliage on its land.

Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption Chief Almir Narayamoga Surui of the Paiter Surui community is projected on rainforest trees.

Almir Narayamoga Surui, the chief of the indigenous community that currently numbers around 1,300 people, has been given the task of replanting and protecting part of the rainforest by the government.

"Since the beginning of this year, we are undergoing a total invasion of deforesters and miners of diamonds and gold," he says.

"Every day, 300 trucks leave our territory filled with wood, which represents 600 hectares of deforested forests. And it continues to increase, whilst according to the Constitution of Brazil, it is illegal to deforest an indigenous reservation.

"On the ground, the illegal loggers have heavy means, with caterpillar machines. We have found mercury and cyanide in three rivers of Surui territory because of the miners."

Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption Despite greater awareness around the world of the impacts of deforestation, the scale of forest loss since 2000 has been significant. Data from Google and the University of Maryland says the world lost 230 million hectares of trees between 2000 and 2012 because of logging, fire, disease or storms.
Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption Forest campaigners say this is the equivalent of 50 football fields of trees being cut down, every minute of every day over a 12 year period.
Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption However, over the same time period as all these trees were lost, around 800,000 sq km of new forest was planted.
Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption The global forest monitoring network, Global Forest Watch, says Brazil has made great strides in reducing deforestation, but still loses more tree cover every year than any other tropical country.
Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption Agents from IBAMA, Brazil's environmental police, try to keep an eye on millions of square miles of rainforest - an almost impossible task with limited resources.
Image copyright Philippe Echaroux/Rex Features
Image caption There is still a large number of small, illegal logging camps across the Amazon. Men armed with machetes and chainsaws cutting down valuable Brazilian hardwoods are the foot soldiers in a highly profitable and dangerous trade.

Philippe Echaroux

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