In Pictures

Faceless London: Four hours on Westminster Bridge

Westminster Bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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People on the bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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Sparkly top on Image copyright Jim Grover
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Woman on bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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Jumping on bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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red trousers, red lines Image copyright Jim Grover
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Red t-shirts Image copyright Jim Grover
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Couple holding hands Image copyright Jim Grover
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Man playing bagpipes Image copyright Jim Grover
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Bubbles Image copyright Jim Grover
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Map of London Image copyright Jim Grover
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Shoes on the bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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Person on the bridge Image copyright Jim Grover
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Red hair Image copyright Jim Grover
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Woman with pink nails Image copyright Jim Grover
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Heather Image copyright Jim Grover
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Eating an ice cream Image copyright Jim Grover
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Handing out flyers Image copyright Jim Grover
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Child in pushchair Image copyright Jim Grover
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Man and woman's legs Image copyright Jim Grover
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Selfie stick Image copyright Jim Grover
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Family Image copyright Jim Grover
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Piece of rubbish Image copyright Jim Grover
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Road sweeper Image copyright Jim Grover

Westminster Bridge is one of London's busiest tourist spots, connecting the Houses of Parliament with the London Eye and the attractions on London's South Bank.

At a workshop led by Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden, Jim Grover was set a number of tasks, including "look for interesting faces". But Grover decided to go against the grain and deliberately exclude faces from his pictures.

The resulting 24 images seen here capture those he met on the bridge, from tourists to lovers.

In some cases, Grover urged his subjects to hold still, as he closed in on them while simultaneously explaining why his camera was ignoring their face.

At other times, he was invisible among brief surges of tourists taking pictures of London's landmarks or each other.

All photographs courtesy Jim Grover.

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