In Pictures

In pictures: Fishing in Sierra Leone

The World Bank recently announced that it would invest $4m (£2.8m) into Sierra Leone's fishing industry, a sector that provides employment for about 230,000 people.

Photographer Olivia Acland spent the day with Pepper, a fisherman who sets out from the port of Tombo.

Fishermen in Tombo Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption Tombo is one of the largest fishing ports in Sierra Leone, home to more than 1,000 fishermen.
Pepper and his crew Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption Pepper has been a fisherman all his life, just as his father was. "At this time of year we usually work every day except Sunday," he says. "We leave at 4 or 4.30 in the morning and come back in the afternoon. But when we come back depends on how many we've caught. If we haven't got much we might stay out until the evening."
Mending damaged nets Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption "Rocks at night are a big problem - sometimes our nets get caught on the rocks and tear," says Pepper. "That means we can't go back out until they're fixed and we lose days. It can take a long time to fix the nets."
Pepper returns to shore Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption Pepper and his team arrive back in, having set off at 4.30am. "There are three people in my boat We go out to sea and lay the nets, then we sleep for a few hours until 7am when the sun comes up," says Pepper.
Buyers rush to the shore as the first boats come in Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption As the boats arrive, buyers rush to the shore.
Pepper sorts through the fish he has caught Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption "There are good days and bad days - sometimes, like today, we catch hundreds," says Pepper. "There are other days that we come back with hardly anything. But there are also a lot of expenses to take care of - fuel, equipment, boat maintenance."
Women choose the fish they want to take to market Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption The majority of his latest catch were bonga fish. A dozen bonga are sold to the women for 3,000 Leones, which is about 50p. They then take them to be smoked in Freetown, and afterwards sell them in markets all over the country. A large smoked bonga fish costs 5,000 Leones (90p) and a smaller one costs 2,000 (35p).
Pepper cleans himself after a long 10 hours at sea Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption After 10 hours at sea Pepper and the preparation of the fish for sale, Pepper cleans himself off in the ocean.
Pepper relaxes with his son and friends Image copyright Olivia Acland
Image caption Pepper has one young son (left in blue and orange top) and a wife. She doesn't work so he has to support them both. "Fishing in the rainy season is dangerous. We hardly go out at all in August. The rain is so heavy and there are many storms. It's hard for us at that time."

All photographs © Olivia Acland.