In Pictures

In pictures: Bowling pavilions

Bowls expert Hugh Hornby has been exploring the history and architecture of the UK's bowling pavilions. Here we present a selection of pictures from his latest book, Bowled Over.

Image copyright Historic England
Image caption The Mackintosh Sports Club in Cardiff occupies a grand building once known as Roath Castle and constructed between 1780 and the 1830s. The site was given to the local community by Alfred Mackintosh in 1891.
Image copyright Historic England
Image caption Home to the oldest bowling club in the world, formed in 1753, the green at Lewes Castle in East Sussex also houses this unusual pavilion. It was probably first used to display pot plants and has been here since the mid-19th Century.
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Image caption The pavilion at Burntisland in Fife has been kept in its original state since it was completed in 1893, a year after the green was laid. It is listed Category B.
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Image caption The Scottish Baronial style of architecture influenced some buildings in England, like Fulwood Conservative Club in Preston which opened in 1899. Yet the greens here are of the uneven, crown variety, a form of the game unknown in Scotland.
Image copyright Historic England
Image caption The thatched corner gazebo at the green behind the Painswick Falcon pub in Gloucestershire has been there since at least 1870 when it featured in an early photograph of club members.
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Image caption A typically modest bowls' shed at the Severnside Club in Shrewsbury, formed in 1896.
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Image caption In a constricted site, the members of Lutton Place BC in Edinburgh, decided in 1967 to increase the pavilion's capacity by building an upper storey which projects over the green.
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Image caption The Grade II listed garden house in the grounds of Cockermouth Castle in Cumbria is octagonal in shape, like a number of Georgian bowling buildings. It is now used as the gardener's office.
Image copyright Historic England
Image caption The book contains a number of images drawn from the archive, including this one of members of the Southampton Bowling Green Club at the former pavilion, rebuilt in 1873 and seen here in 1923. The liner in the background is the Mauretania.
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Image caption This shot from the archive is one of the earliest photos of bowlers in Britain. It shows the members of the Chesterfield Bowling Club in front of the Municipal Hall on 24 August 1859. The ground floor of the Hall served as their clubhouse.
Image copyright Historic England
Image caption The former pavilion at the Milton Regis club in Kent originally bore the date of 1900, but at some point this was amended to 1540, though no-one at the club can explain why.

Bowled Over - the bowling greens of Britain by Hugh Hornby is published by Historic England.