Mental health: Can you tell if someone is struggling?

Published

Lockdowns, social distancing, working from home, furloughs and job losses - the pandemic has put an extra strain on people's lives, relationships and mental wellbeing.

According to a study by the Mental Health Foundation published in February, anxiety and worry because of the pandemic actually declined, as people became more hopeful about lockdowns lifting. But amongst vulnerable groups, there are still high levels of anxiety.

See how you would react in this scenario, where someone is struggling:

As we emerge from restrictions and start interacting with colleagues, friends and family more than we have done over the last few months, looking out for someone's mental health is just as important as their physical health. Around one in five adults experienced some form of depression in the first few months of this year, more than twice as many as before the coronavirus pandemic struck.

See how you would react in this scenario, where someone is struggling:

If you or someone you know needs support, here are some organisations and charities that may be able to help:

The scenario tools have been produced with guidance from Mental Health First Aid England, a social enterprise which offers training courses and resources.

Produced by Chi Chi Izundu and Dominic Bailey with illustrations by Sandra Rodriguez Chillida

More on this story