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Photo gallery: Healthcare challenges in Afghanistan

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image copyrightMSF/Mikhail Galustov
image captionAbdul and his eight-year-old daughter, Fatima, travelled 80km (50 miles) from home to seek medical care. The 250-bed hospital in Lashkar Gah serves a population of about one million in one of the provinces most affected by conflict. Photo: MSF/Mikhail Galustov.
image copyrightMSF/Mikhail Galustov
image captionMedecins Sans Frontieres' trauma centre in Kunduz is the only surgical centre of its kind in the north. Staff treat victims of general trauma, as well as those with injuries from bomb blasts or gunshots. In 2013, about 17,000 patients were treated and 4,500 surgeries carried out in the hospital. Photo: MSF/Mikhail Galustov.
image copyrightAndrea Bruce/Noor Images
image captionWomen in most areas of Afghanistan require permission from their husbands to visit a health facility and are usually obliged to be accompanied by a male relative. If there is no man available to take them, this can delay or prevent them seeking medical care. Photo: Andrea Bruce/Noor Images.
image copyrightAndrea Bruce/Noor Images
image captionWomen who go into labour or experience bleeding in the late afternoon or at night are often unable to find free care nearby and have to either travel far at significant risk and cost, or to deliver at home. Without skilled medical help, they are more at risk of illness or death if they face complications. Photo: Andrea Bruce/Noor Images.
image copyrightAndrea Bruce/Noor Images
image captionDeliveries have doubled over the past two years to reach an average of 1,000 per month. In more remote areas, many public clinics are only open in the morning, which does not fit with the reality of labour, as women need access to delivery services at any time. Photo: Andrea Bruce/Noor Images.
image copyrightMSF/Mikhail Galustov
image captionThe conflict not only injures and kills people directly, but also indirectly, by impeding their access to healthcare. Many wait until their condition has deteriorated to the point of endangering their lives before risking the journey to reach treatment. Photo: MSF/Mikhail Galustov.
image copyright Andrea Bruce/Noor Images
image captionChildren come for vaccinations at MSF’s mobile clinic in Speena Posa village, in the eastern outskirts of Kabul. MSF began running mobile clinics to reach out to more isolated areas where people struggle to access quality healthcare. Photo: Andrea Bruce/Noor Images.

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