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Coronavirus: Where can I now go on holiday in the UK?

Published
4 August
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  • Coronavirus pandemic
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It is now possible to take a holiday in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and England, following the relaxation of lockdown rules, although some restrictions remain in place.

What's changed?

Across the UK, you are now allowed to stay overnight away from the place where you are living.
You can travel as far as you want within the borders of those countries, and sleep in a second home or self-contained holiday accommodation.
Hotels and B&Bs are also open, as well as many caravan parks and campsites, hostels and boarding houses.
Holiday accommodation in Scotland reopened on 15 July.
In Wales, people can now book holidays in self-contained accommodation or hotels, B&Bs and campsites with shared facilities.
Self-catering tourist accommodation has also opened again in Northern Ireland.
These rules do not apply to areas that have had some lockdown measures reimposed.
People in Greater Manchester, east Lancashire and parts of West Yorkshire are not allowed to meet other households in their homes, gardens or any other indoor venue, either inside or outside the local area.
Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said travel between Scotland and those areas should only be undertaken if "absolutely essential".
And people in Leicester have been told to stay at home as much as possible and avoid non-essential travel.

Hotels and B&Bs

Hotels and B&Bs have been asked to take a number of precautions when reopening. Among them:
  • Encourage guests to take stairs rather than lifts where practical
  • Encourage the use of face coverings in the corridors
  • Promote room service rather than communal dining rooms (and leave room service meals outside the door rather than carrying them in to the guests)
  • Maintain effective social distancing between staff and guests - for instance, screens could be installed in front of the reception desk
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Hostels

In hostels, shared sleeping areas such as dormitory rooms will not reopen except to people travelling as part of a household or support bubble.
Other shared facilities, such as communal kitchens or shower blocks, will remain shut, along with communal areas such as TV rooms, where social distancing is not possible.

Campsites and caravan parks

Campers and caravanners will notice a number of changes on site, although probably fewer than those encountered by hotel guests.
For instance, the Caravan and Motorhome Club, which operates more than 200 campsites in the UK, says that visitors will now check in by phone on arrival.
The government says that indoor shared facilities such as communal kitchens should remain closed. Bars and dining areas may be opened, but only if they can do so safely.
Shower facilities will be open, but they will be cleaned more often. Sites may choose to adopt staggered entry times and booked timeslots.
Toilet blocks will also be cleaned more regularly, and systems may be in place to control the number of people using them at any one time.
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Can I go on holiday with friends?

In England, two households of any size can now meet up indoors - and this can be in shared accommodation away from home, for instance a cottage or apartment.
However, unless the households are part of the same support bubble, they will need to stay socially distanced from each other (a distance of "one metre plus" in England).
Government guidance states that the holidaymakers should "take particular care to maintain excellent hygiene - washing hands and surfaces - and avoid using shared facilities like bathrooms wherever possible".
It also advises that you should not share private swimming pools with anyone outside your household or support bubble, nor should you share a paddling pool or any sort of garden equipment.
Overnight stays in Scotland have been allowed since 10 July - although, as with England, social distancing requirements remain.
The same applies to Northern Ireland. There are also no travel restrictions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
In Wales, overnight stays are only permitted where two households have formed an "extended household". So going on holiday with anyone other than that is still not allowed.

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