Entertainment & Arts

'I was traumatised': Jeremy Kyle Show guests relive their appearances

The Jeremy Kyle Show Image copyright ITV/REX/Shutterstock

ITV has axed The Jeremy Kyle Show following the death of a man who had appeared on the programme.

The confrontational daytime show was known for its its heated encounters between partners and family members, with Kyle acting as mediator.

Here, some former guests tell BBC News about their own experiences of the show.

'No-one was there to help me'

Dwayne Davison was labelled "the most hated guest ever" after his appearance with his girlfriend, who he thought was cheating on him, in 2014.

"They enticed me with a lie detector, so I went on and got it done. How was I meant to know that, out of everyone, I'd be labelled the most hated? I was a little bit cheeky... I was a silly 21-year-old. I've given him a little bit of lip, but other that that, what had I done?

"Of course I knew what Jeremy Kyle was about... but it was a snap reaction. I seen the number on the television and I basically texted it and forgot about it. About three days later, I got a phone call, and within an hour I was off to Manchester [where the show was filmed]. It's unbelievable what they've done to my life.

"I keep hearing about this myth about the aftercare team. I've never had a phone call off them. I got a call from the producer who said, 'Your show's going to be up at this time', but I never got aftercare.

"When I tried a suicide attempt, I nearly took my own life, no-one was there to help me. They put me in the limelight but I didn't understand what was happening.

"I asked them, 'Please don't show it, it's affecting my mental health, it's affecting me very bad knowing I'm going to be the most hated person ever.' But they did not want to hear, they told me they couldn't stop it now."

Dwayne Davison was speaking to BBC Radio 5 Live.



'I was just totally traumatised'

Martin was asked to go on the show to prove he hadn't been unfaithful - but claims the lie detector test gave the wrong result.

"I was asked to go on. I suppose I'd had enough of - it's a strong word, I can't think of any other one - of accusations against my character, my supposed infidelity.

"I got a request. Someone on the show phoned me and said my [now] ex-partner had contacted them. So I just sort of said, 'OK, let's get this sorted, let's put this to bed,' so to speak.

"I was reasonably confident that even though I was nervous, that all would be well. So I took the tests and they all came out wrong on the show itself.

"[I was asked], 'Did I ever kiss passionately another woman during my time with my ex-partner?,' and 'Did I have a sexual relationship with anyone during my time?'. Both of which I answered no.

"I came off the stage, and I was just totally traumatised. I think I got about three phone calls during a course of a couple of months asking me how I was. Obviously I said, 'I'm not very well, I'm not very good about this'. And the advice was, 'Well it's OK, you know, it's time to move on, put it behind you.'"

Martin was speaking to Emma Barnett on BBC Radio 5 Live.


'The aftercare was really good'

Michael went on the show in 2012 to take a DNA test and find out if the man who he had grown up with as his dad was his biological father.

"They supported me through one of the hardest times of my life. On a personal aspect, I thought it was very beneficial. Albeit the DNA test results were not what I wanted to be, it gave me some closure.

"Me and my brother were told by my mum that she didn't actually know who our real father was and it wasn't the dad we grew up with. I'd thought I'd message the Jeremy Kyle show with our story.

"They messaged me back very quickly and arranged us a taxi about 8pm the next evening. The next day we were taken to the studio and they sat us down in a room with a runner.

"The only contact we had with Jeremy was when we were on the stage. He brought my dad on and the results showed he wasn't my real father. It turned out my mum had had an affair for 15 years.

"The aftercare was really good. They stayed in touch for about 12 months after and offered, if I wanted, to search for my biological father. I said no. They also sent us all the DNA paperwork and stepped in to defend us on social media when the episode aired.

"I never really watch the show but I am sad it was cancelled as I think they are focusing on one negative thing rather than all the good he has done."


'They twisted our words'

Charlene appeared on the show 10 years ago with a friend.

"I watched the show every day and enjoy it, but people don't realise what happens behind the scenes.

"I called the show up to take my friend on to get a DNA test to prove that the father of her kid was in fact the dad. They invited us to the studio the next day.

"We were put up in a hotel, and separated. The producers kept calling me all through the night to ask questions and tell me what other people had been saying.

"They manipulated everything I said and it makes you argue and fall out. Before the show, you are put in a room on your own for two hours while producers come in and tell you things the others are saying about you, so you're angry.

"I felt manipulated for entertainment, and ended up having a blazing row with my best friend on stage. They made her think I had called her a slapper, which I hadn't. It was shocking how they twisted our words.

"We'd been best friends for about 10 years, but after that we fell out and never made up."


In a statement released on Tuesday, before the show was axed, ITV said: "The programme has significant and detailed duty of care processes in place for contributors pre, during and post show which have been built up over 14 years, and there have been numerous positive outcomes from this, including people who have resolved complex and long-standing personal problems."

A welfare team including a consultant psychotherapist and three mental health nurses carried out a "comprehensive assessment" in advance and supported the guests during and after filming, ITV added.

After filming, the team evaluated whether the guests needed further treatment such as residential rehabilitation, counselling, anger management, family mediation, child access mediation or couple counselling.

ITV added that a welfare check was carried out the next day, and the production team stayed in contact before the episode was broadcast and gave the guests their phone number in case they needed to get in contact after that.


If you are feeling emotionally distressed and would like details of organisations in the UK which offer advice and support, go to bbc.co.uk/actionline.

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