Entertainment & Arts

Video art wins Jerwood Drawing Prize

First prize-winning artist Solveig Settemsdal with her video, Singularity Image copyright Jerwood Drawing Prize/Hydar Dewachi
Image caption First prize-winning artist Solveig Settemsdal with her video, Singularity

A nine-minute video of swirling white ink in gelatine has been awarded the Jerwood Drawing Prize.

Norwegian artist Solveig Settemsdal won the £8,000 first prize for Singularity, which she said explores "a temporal and sculptural process of drawing".

It is the first time a video has been awarded the prestigious prize.

Professor Anita Taylor, director of the Jerwood Drawing Prize, said the piece and other winning works were "confident and lively examples of drawing today".

Settemsdal's work shows ink suspended in cubes of gelatine, manipulated by the artist.

The Glasgow School of Art graduate, who is now based at Spike Island, Bristol, said of her work: "In constant transformation, the white mineral ink and the biological gelatine lattice initiate a balance between conscious intention and material process."

Image copyright Jerwood Drawing Prize/Hydar Dewachi
Image caption Sid in Bathtub, left, with other works selected for exhibition by the Jerwood Drawing Prize panel

Second prize went to Anna Sofie Jespersen for a ballpoint pen on tracing paper drawing of a man lying, fully clothed, in a bath.

Jespersen, who was awarded £5,000 for Sid in Bathtub, is a Danish artist studying at the Chelsea College of Art.

Her work was described by the Jerwood judges as "a poetic and tragic work intricate in line and tonality".

Image copyright Jerwood Drawing Prize/Hydar Dewachi
Image caption Amelie Barnathan's work shows 'dreams and nightmares'
Image copyright Jerwood Drawing Prize/Hydar Dewachi
Image caption Jade Chorkularb explored the question of what people would do with the last hour of their life

Two students awards, of £2,000 each, were awarded to Jade Chorkularb and Amelie Barnathan.

Chorkularb's work, That What They Would Do, is a video of real-time drawing of answers given by people when asked what they would do if they only had one hour of their life left.

Illustrator Barnathan's drawings are described by Jerwood as "large-scale, visceral, surreal and confrontational" works which show "dreams and nightmares".

A panel of judges has chosen 61 works by 55 artists for an exhibition at the Jerwood Space in London. The Jerwood Drawing Prize show is on until 23 October.

Prof Taylor said: "Their works are confident and lively examples of drawing today, fresh in outlook and conception; unafraid to source, mine and examine the historic, spiritual, and visceral imagination through the act of drawing."


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