Brush with May signposted Brexit maze

Theresa May has announced she will resign on 7 June Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Theresa May has announced she will resign on 7 June

In June 2016, I was despatched to a hairbrush factory in Bangor, County Down, to interview a VIP who had just flown across from London to back the Remain campaign.

It turned out to be the then Home Secretary, Theresa May.

She had been accused by some fellow Remainers of keeping her head down during the campaign to the point of being invisible.

So you might have thought her decision to break cover would have been big news.

However, that period had seen a raft of ministers travelling across for pro-Remain photo ops (George Osborne had just been and gone).

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European Election 2019: Brexit dominates NI TV debate

Spotlight election debate

Six candidates in this week's European parliamentary election in Northern Ireland have clashed over Brexit, the Irish border backstop and whether there should be another referendum.

They were appearing on a special BBC Spotlight debate on Tuesday night.

Read full article European Election 2019: Brexit dominates NI TV debate

Success of the 'Others' remains election talking point

Aine Groogan Image copyright PAcemaker
Image caption The Green Party's Aine Groogan topped the poll in Botanic DEA

With the Northern Ireland council results done and dusted, the rise of the "others" remains the big talking point.

At the Stormont Assembly, the "others" are the parties who decline to sign in as either unionists or nationalists, writing in another description of their choice.

Read full article Success of the 'Others' remains election talking point

Alliance surge in NI council elections a striking development

Alliance's Ross McMullan (centre) celebrates his election Image copyright Pacemaker
Image caption Alliance's Ross McMullan (centre) got almost 1,000 votes over the quota when he was elected to Belfast City Council

PR elections in Northern Ireland are always more of a marathon than a sprint, so it's wise not to overanalyse the results at the halfway mark.

The protracted drama of single transferable voting means that both candidates and parties who looked like hares early on turn into tortoises as the white tape approaches.

Read full article Alliance surge in NI council elections a striking development

As fife and drum beat for Brexit, what happens next?

Two Scottish bands marched around Westminster in support of Brexit
Image caption Two Scottish bands marched around Westminster in support of Brexit

For a moment it looked and sounded like a mini-twelfth.

Two marching bands banged out some tunes on their flutes and drums, an Ulster flag flew overhead.

Read full article As fife and drum beat for Brexit, what happens next?

Is Karen Bradley running out of road?

Karen Bradley arrives for a cabinet meeting Image copyright AFP/Getty
Image caption Downing Street may hope the storm over Ms Bradley's comments blows over

Karen Bradley is not the first and probably will not be the last Northern Ireland Secretary to slip spectacularly on a political banana skin.

There was Peter Brooke persuaded on an RTE TV chat show to give a rendition of "Oh My Darling, Clementine" on a day when seven Protestant workmen had been killed in an IRA bombing.

Read full article Is Karen Bradley running out of road?

Brexit vote: A way out, or just a dead end?

Theresa May Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Can Theresa May find a way out of the current Brexit impasse?

So after Theresa May's dramatic parliamentary u-turn, is Alliance Party deputy leader Stephen Farry right to claim the Brexit bandwagon is now heading down a dead end?

According to the so-called Malthouse compromise, named after the Conservative Housing Minister Kit Malthouse, the "alternative arrangements" which UK diplomats are now tasked to explore for the border will be based on the Brexiteer blueprint "A Better Deal" published in December.

Read full article Brexit vote: A way out, or just a dead end?

Can the SDLP and Fianna Fáil avoid the curse of history?

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Media captionColum Eastwood accepts that the SDLP's pairing with Fianna Fáil could be "uncomfortable for some"

"Don't underplay this," an SDLP insider implored me as I arrived for the launch of the party's new arrangement with Fianna Fáil. "It's an unprecedented partnership between two parties on this island."

"Are you sure?" I countered. "What about the time the Ulster Unionists got together with the Conservatives?"

Read full article Can the SDLP and Fianna Fáil avoid the curse of history?

Big Ben silenced - but Brexit clocks are ticking

Big Ben chimed for the last time in August and will not sound until 2021
Image caption Big Ben chimed for the last time in August and will not sound until 2021

Last night, MPs engaged in a bizarre ritual leaping to their feet at the moment the debate on the meaningful vote on the Brexit deal should have recommenced.

An opposition MP beat the government whip to the punch by shouting "now".

Read full article Big Ben silenced - but Brexit clocks are ticking

May likely to face mixed reception on NI visit

Arlene Foster and Theresa May Image copyright AFP
Image caption Arlene Foster's meeting with Theresa May will be civil in spite of the DUP leader's criticism of the PM

Politics can be a topsy-turvy business.

Not so long ago, the four Stormont parties opposed to Brexit complained that Theresa May was refusing to see them as a joint delegation.

Read full article May likely to face mixed reception on NI visit