Brexit: Is Boris Johnson profiting from dividing?

Boris Johnson Image copyright AFP/Getty Images

Not even a couple of months have passed, but it seems a lifetime since Boris Johnson said he wanted to bring the country together as he arrived in Downing Street as prime minister for the first time.

Because so far his time in No 10 has suggested he believes he will profit instead from a divide.

That's the crack that his team identifies between leavers and former remainers - described by one cabinet minister, as "those who either want to get things done that matter to people, or MPs who want to stand up and repeat ad nauseam the things they have been saying about Brexit for the last three years".

The "dividing line", is far from a new phenomenon in politics - it was beloved by Gordon Brown, then George Osborne too - maybe politicians since time began - a way of creating an easily understandable political choice for the public, a way for politicians to say "pick us or them".

But it's not just a line this time, it's like a toxic separation.

Read full article Brexit: Is Boris Johnson profiting from dividing?

Kuenssberg: Is PM's Brexit deadline impossible?

Boris Johnson Image copyright Reuters

In the last six days you might have been enraged, you might have been shocked, you might have been excited, or you might have just shrugged your shoulders.

But we are watching a conflict over an issue that is based on what one cabinet minister described as "love and passion" - politically, at least.

Read full article Kuenssberg: Is PM's Brexit deadline impossible?

First day of an election campaign?

Media playback is unsupported on your device
Media caption"You should be in Brussels; you're in Morley," a member of the public told Boris Johnson when he arrived

Downing Street wanted it to seem like the first day of an election campaign that's springing into life.

Even though they have yet to find their way through the process that would actually make it happen, the plan was clear: play to the perceived strengths of portraying the prime minister as the leader outside Westminster - where politicians are trying to delay Brexit - and on the side of the public.

Read full article First day of an election campaign?

An election is on the way - but will the PM get his breakneck timetable?

Boris Johnson speaks in the House of Commons Image copyright Reuters

"We're snookered," a member of the Cabinet whispered as they stopped for a brief word, rushing past during this most frantic 48 hours.

And it seems they may well be right. On paper, the prime minister is dead set on securing the election he claims not to want.

Read full article An election is on the way - but will the PM get his breakneck timetable?

Could Commons defeat yet prove to be a benefit to PM?

It's hard to know where to start sometimes.

The pace and gravity of events in Westminster this week is both monumental and dizzying.

Read full article Could Commons defeat yet prove to be a benefit to PM?

Did Boris Johnson just announce an election without actually doing so?

Boris Johnson speaking outside Downing Street Image copyright PA Media

Did Boris Johnson just announce an election without actually announcing an election?

He's always said that he really doesn't want to go to the country again.

Read full article Did Boris Johnson just announce an election without actually doing so?

Laura Kuenssberg: Why is Johnson planning to deselect Tory rebels?

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Image copyright Getty Images

Buckle up. This next sentence is one that in normal political times (remember them?) might give any follower of politics palpitations.

Tory MPs who vote against the government in the Commons this week will be chucked out of the party and banned from standing for the Conservatives at the next election.

Read full article Laura Kuenssberg: Why is Johnson planning to deselect Tory rebels?

Laura Kuenssberg: Can the rebel alliance stop no-deal Brexit?

Philip Hammond and Jeremy Corbyn Image copyright PA/EPA
Image caption Opposition to Mr Johnson has made unlikely political allies

It doesn't take long to find outrage around here - genuine or confected.

That's been the case for as long as the arguments about Brexit have been raging, longer than many of us might care to remember.

Read full article Laura Kuenssberg: Can the rebel alliance stop no-deal Brexit?

Laura Kuenssberg: PM's suspension move decisive and intensely risky

Boris Johnson Image copyright AFP/Getty Images

If you follow politics and were lucky enough to have been enjoying a summer break (and I hope so, I was!), it's over.

In the next few hours, after formal calls and a Privy Council meeting at Balmoral, No 10's plan that puts them on a full collision course with Parliament will be in train.

Read full article Laura Kuenssberg: PM's suspension move decisive and intensely risky

Ten things for the summer break

Beach

After months of gradual atrophy, simmering frustration and pretty toxic arguments, the inhabitants of the Westminster village are slowly disappearing for a while - whether to help constituents, take to a sun lounger, or a mixture of the two.

When the place fills up again on the other side of the summer, if the last 48 hours are anything to go by, events might be even more dramatic, and wildly unpredictable.

Read full article Ten things for the summer break