US-China trade deal: Five things that aren't in it

  • 16 January 2020
  • From the section Business
US President Donald Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, hold up signed agreements of phase 1 of a trade deal. Image copyright Getty Images

The US and China have finally - after almost two years of hostilities - signed a "phase one" deal. But it only covers the easier aspects of their difficult relationship, and only removes some of the tariffs.

The biggest hurdles are still to come, and could stand in the way of a second phase agreement - one that would in theory remove all of the tariffs, bringing some much needed relief for the global economy, which is in the interests of all of us.

What's not in the phase one deal tells us where the flashpoints are in the US-China relationship - and what could derail the second round of negotiations.

So what didn't make it into the agreement?

1. Industrial subsidies and 'Made in China 2025'

The deal doesn't address Beijing's ambitious 'Made in China 2025' programme, which is designed to help Chinese companies excel and become world-class leaders in emerging technologies. It also doesn't address the subsidies that China gives its state-owned enterprises, says Paul Triolo of the Eurasia Group.

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Media captionWhat is Beijing planning with its "Made in China 2025" programme?

Read full article US-China trade deal: Five things that aren't in it

Tesco faces Thai regulatory threat to $10bn deal

  • 15 January 2020
  • From the section Business
Tesco Lotus store in Thailand Image copyright AFP

The sale of Tesco's prized Asian assets - which are potentially valued at up to $10bn (£7.7bn) - may be at risk because of Thailand's competition regulations.

The supermarket chain has nearly 2,000 outlets in Thailand and Malaysia that three Thai groups are hoping to buy.

Read full article Tesco faces Thai regulatory threat to $10bn deal

Alibaba: Why the e-commerce giant is betting on Hong Kong

  • 22 November 2019
  • From the section Business
Daniel Zhang Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Alibaba chairman Daniel Zhang says Hong Kong's future is "bright"

Political protests and petrol bombs aren't the ideal backdrop for a top global company looking to raise billions of dollars from investors.

But that's exactly what Alibaba is doing.

Read full article Alibaba: Why the e-commerce giant is betting on Hong Kong

‘I don’t have any hope for my future in Hong Kong’

  • 29 September 2019
  • From the section Business
Left: Leung Suet Lam, 18 years old. Nickname “Bu”; Right Cheung Ka Ho, 20 years old. Nickname “Dicky”
Image caption Students Leung Suet Lam and Dicky Cheung have a bleak vision of their future

"I entered university to get a better life, but I don't have hope for my future," 20-year-old Dicky Cheung tells me.

Dicky and his friends are students, but behind their camaraderie and carefree smiles lies an anxiety about their futures.

Read full article ‘I don’t have any hope for my future in Hong Kong’

How business is adapting to Hong Kong's new reality

  • 2 September 2019
  • From the section Business
Hong Kong street

Foreign companies face a new business reality in Hong Kong. There's a rising sense of uncertainty washing over the corporate world here, as firms confront a shifting political landscape after months of unrest.

Millions of Hong Kong citizens have taken part in pro-democracy protests that have drawn the ire of many in mainland China.

Read full article How business is adapting to Hong Kong's new reality

UK sees record foreign investment in tech start-ups

  • 21 August 2019
  • From the section Business
Office Image copyright Getty Images

UK tech companies secured a record £5.5bn in foreign investment in the first seven months of this year, research shows.

This was more than the amount invested per capita in the US tech sector in the same period, the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport said.

Read full article UK sees record foreign investment in tech start-ups

Can fresh US-China talks end the trade war?

  • 30 July 2019
  • From the section Business
USA and China flags Image copyright Getty Images

Top trade negotiators from the US and China are meeting for the first time in almost three months on Tuesday to try and do a deal, but expectations are low.

Still, while there's been an apparent lull since the two sides last sat down and talked, there's been plenty going on under the surface.

Read full article Can fresh US-China talks end the trade war?

New cracks in the global economy as exports tumble

  • 18 July 2019
  • From the section Business
This photo taken on May 14, 2019 shows a customer selecting imported items at a store in the Qingdao free trade port area in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province. Image copyright EPA
Image caption China's economy is growing at its slowest pace since 1990s as it fights a trade war with the US

If you were in any doubt that the US-China trade war is having an impact on Asia, look no further than Singapore's latest export figures.

Singapore saw exports fall for a second month in a row, this time by 17.3% in the month of June compared to a year ago.

Read full article New cracks in the global economy as exports tumble

G20 summit: All eyes on Trump-Xi trade war showdown

  • 27 June 2019
  • From the section Business
A woman takes a picture of a G20 Osaka design set up outside the venue for the G20 Osaka Summit in Osaka on June 26, 2019, ahead of the start of the summit later this week. Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The leaders of the US and China are due to meet at the G20 summit in Japan this week

Leaders from the Group of 20 nations (G20) will meet in Osaka from Friday in what is likely to be its most important summit since the global financial crisis.

When the G20 met in Washington one month after the Lehman Brothers crash in 2008, they were focused on a mammoth task: how to piece the world economy back together and avoid a future crisis.

Read full article G20 summit: All eyes on Trump-Xi trade war showdown

Indonesia election: Why one vote could put a thousand Indonesias at stake

  • 16 April 2019
  • From the section Asia
A woman seen casting her ballot during pre-election drill, April 17 2019 Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption A woman votes during Indonesia's pre-election drill

While the world marvels at Indonesia's staging of the most complex single-day election in history, the real challenge for the country runs far deeper.

A rising tide of intolerance could put the hard-won unity of the country with more Muslims than anywhere else on Earth - unique for being so geographically far-flung and culturally diverse - at real risk.

Read full article Indonesia election: Why one vote could put a thousand Indonesias at stake