Sir Kim Darroch: Five things the UK ambassador row reveals about Trump

President Donald Trump and Sir Kim Darroch Image copyright AFP/PA Media
Image caption Mr Trump had said we would "no longer deal with" Sir Kim Darroch

With Sir Kim Darroch heading for the exit, the US portion of the leaked cable controversy draws to a close.

While the British government will continue to deal with political fallout for weeks, if not months, to come, it's not too early to provide assessment from the US side of the Atlantic.

Here are five things we learned.

Norm-breaking crosses borders

As Forrest Gump might say, power is as power does. Donald Trump as president has made a habit of stripping away norms and traditions - the veneer that cloaks the exercise of political power - and operating according to his own set of rules.

There have been howls of protest from the president's political opponents and the occasional tut-tutting from members of his own party, but he has operated largely unchecked.

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Media captionTheresa May and Jeremy Corbyn pay tribute to Sir Kim Darroch's service

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Democratic debates: Who were the winners and losers?

Buttigeig, Biden, Harris, Sanders, Hickenlooper and Williamson

The first Democratic debate double-header is in the books. Two nights, two groups of 10, one set of winners and losers.

Here's a look at who ended up on top this week and who was left stumbling for the exits.

WINNERS

Kamala Harris

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US election 2020: Key takeaways from Democratic debate

Miami debate stage Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption From left: De Blasio, Ryan, Castro, Booker, Warren and O'Rourke

The first Democratic presidential debate is in the books, and 10 of the 20 candidates who qualified for the proceedings have had their say - in one-minute chunks.

Now that we've had a chance to see what at least some of this massive presidential field has been able to do on the same stage and under the spotlight, here are a few takeaways.

Sparks fly on healthcare

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US election 2020: What to expect in Democratic debates

Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker

The first Democratic debates are like the opening round of a golf tournament. There's no way to win the prize right now, but plenty of ways to lose it for good.

The candidates, their visions and their plans will be put in the crucible on Wednesday and Thursday night. There will be more tests to come, but this is the first real chance to see how they hold up under pressure.

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Bernie Sanders: What’s different this time around?

Sanders with young fans Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Sanders scores high with under-30s

In 2016 Bernie Sanders arrived on the Democratic presidential scene with all the surprise of a thunderclap in a blue sky.

He set fundraising records, drew rally crowds of tens of thousands and, for a time, cast the once-seemingly inevitable nomination of Hillary Clinton in doubt.

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Florida supporters on why they want Trump to win in 2020

A man holds up a sign as the crowd waits for US President Donald Trump to arrive at a rally at the Amway Center in Orlando Image copyright AFP
Image caption Thousands of fans were packed into Orlando's Amway Center

On Tuesday night in Orlando, Florida, Donald Trump "officially" kicked off his presidential re-election bid.

Of course, everyone knew he was going to run for re-election. That was hardly a surprise. He filed his 2020 paperwork the day after his January 2017 inauguration, and he's been holding regular campaign-style rallies across key battleground states ever since.

Read full article Florida supporters on why they want Trump to win in 2020

Donald Trump impeachment debate: What will Democrats do?

An impeachment sign is held up near the US Capitol. Image copyright Getty Images

Ever since Robert Mueller's special counsel investigation concluded in March, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has been walking a fine line on initiating impeachment proceedings against the president.

She says she wants to keep all options open, with an array of congressional investigations, but hold off on the "i" word, as Donald Trump calls it.

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Robert Mueller statement: What special counsel really meant

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Media captionRobert Mueller: Charging Donald Trump "was not an option"

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a Robert Mueller statement is worth a 448-page report.

For the first time in his more than two years as special counsel, Mueller has spoken publicly about his investigation.

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Abortion in US: What surprise Supreme Court ruling means

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Media captionThe abortion battle explained in three minutes

In a surprise move, the Supreme Court has issued a pair of decisions on an Indiana law restricting abortions, offering clues on how the nine-member court - with two new justices appointed by Donald Trump - could view the contentious issue in the days and years ahead.

The court's actions were a mixed bag for those on both sides of the abortion debate.

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Joe Biden: Can Obama's vice-president stay the Democratic frontrunner?

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Media captionJoe Biden: Will it be third time lucky in 2020?

It's been four weeks since Joe Biden announced he was running for president. Since then, in defiance of what was conventional wisdom, he's risen in the polls, posted impressive fund-raising numbers and seemingly shrugged off allegations of inappropriate physical contact with women.

The candidate many thought to be a paper tiger, temporarily buoyed by high name recognition and little else, has shown some teeth.

Read full article Joe Biden: Can Obama's vice-president stay the Democratic frontrunner?