Does Clinton email report help or hurt Trump?

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The Department of Justice Inspector General's report is out, and it doesn't pull its punches.

Over the course of 500 pages, Michael Horowitz has very pointed criticism of former FBI Director James Comey and other top FBI officials for their actions during the 2016 investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state.

Here's a rundown of the key players in the 2016 drama and what the inspector general's report means for them.

Donald Trump

The president will likely celebrate the fact that Mr Horowitz had critical words about James Comey and claim that it undermines the former FBI director's credibility going forward - but he'll be doing it for all the wrong reasons. His actions weren't part of a deep state conspiracy to help Mrs Clinton. If anything, they hurt her.

Rather than assailing Mr Comey for failing to charge Mrs Clinton with a crime - to "lock her up", as candidate Trump frequently urged - the inspector general said the former FBI director mishandled the way he announced her exoneration and displayed a "serious error in judgement" in telling Congress he was reopening the investigation on the eve of the election.

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Trump on Kim: 'He's a funny guy' and other summit quotes

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Media captionWas the summit a win-win for both countries, or a Kim win?

The handshake has happened, the summit is over, and now Donald Trump is hitting the media circuit - including his first sit-down interview with a major news network other than Fox - to make the case for what he has accomplished.

Because it's Mr Trump, some of what he has to say is head-scratching, other parts will have his supporters smirking or swooning, while many of his critics will be outraged. Here are a few of his key lines - and what they could mean.

The 'smart' line

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The one Trump statistic that explains everything

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The Republican Party is Donald Trump's party. If there were any doubts about this, recent polling - which shows the president with near record levels of backing from Republican voters - confirms the fact.

According to a recent Gallup Poll, Mr Trump's support among members of his own party at the 500-day mark of his presidency sits at 87%, second only to George W Bush's 96%, which came nine months after the September 11 World Trade Center attacks.

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Dinesh D'Souza: Why did Trump pardon the provocateur?

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On Thursday morning Donald Trump announced that he would use his presidential powers to pardon Dinesh D'Souza, who had pleaded guilty in 2014 for campaign finance law violations.

It marks the latest twist in the rise, fall and Trump-facilitated rehabilitation of the Indian-born conservative author, lecturer and all-around political provocateur.

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Analysing Trump's letter to Kim Jong-un

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Donald Trump called off the upcoming US-North Korea summit on Thursday morning, catching much of official Washington, and the world, by surprise. How he did it - in a personal letter to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un - offers revealing insight at Trump-style diplomacy and what might happen next.

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The missive from Donald Trump - addressed to "his excellency", an unusual title for Mr Kim - begins a bit like a corporate form letter, thanking the North Korean leader for his "time, patience and effort".

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'Spygate': The facts behind President Trump's conspiracy

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President Trump calls it "Spygate" and a Deep State conspiracy against him. His critics warn it's a distraction tactic and an effort to undermine trust in the investigation into whether his campaign colluded with Russia.

On Thursday, the Justice Department briefed congressional leaders on classified information about the FBI's use of a secret informant who met with Trump aides.

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What are the US Democrats' big ideas?

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One of the ongoing criticisms of Democrats since Barack Obama moved out of the White House is that the party has been defined by what it opposes, instead of what it wants to do.

They're not Donald Trump. They're against travel bans, border walls, trade wars, financial and environmental deregulation, corporate tax cuts and repeal of the Obamacare health insurance system.

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Kaitlin Bennett: Why she wore a rifle for graduation photos

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A woman who slung an assault-style rifle across her shoulder for her graduation photos in the US has sparked a fierce debate over personal freedom, student protests and white privilege.

Kaitlin Bennett graduated from Kent State University in Ohio with a degree in biology.

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Three reasons behind Trump ditching Iran deal

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Media captionIran nuclear deal: Trump announces US pull-out

President Donald Trump wasn't always so dead against the Iran deal and it's not a big issue for voters, so why is he pulling out now?

It was a move that had been telegraphed for months, despite last-ditch attempts by US allies and domestic backers of the agreement to convince the president to stick with the status quo.

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The big question at heart of Stormy Daniels saga

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For the first time, President Donald Trump has admitted involvement in the six-figure payment of a porn actress who says they had an affair. This raises a very big question.

His assertion that he had no knowledge of any payment to secure Stormy Daniels' silence seems, to borrow a phrase from Nixon administration press secretary Ron Ziegler, to be "no longer operative".

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