Have American newspapers given Donald Trump a gift?

Donald Trump Image copyright EPA

More than 350 American newspapers have co-ordinated editorials this week, condemning President Trump's attacks on the media.

The Bangor Daily News in Maine and Yankton County Observer in South Dakota don't usually have much in common.

But this week they belong to a collective effort by a somewhat beleaguered industry to declare themselves on the side of democracy. The implication being that the current occupant of the White House - in his attacks on traditional media at least - is not.

A generous interpretation of this joint effort is that solidarity is a precious asset in a trade that was battered by the internet long before it was battered by Mr Trump. By coming together to fight his undoubtedly vicious assault on the people he calls the "fake news media", newspapers might show that, together, they will not be cowed.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption The Boston Globe's front page editorial

Moreover, aside from the editorials themselves, which between them will be read by millions of Americans, this joint effort is a marketing exercise. It allows titles, many of which have vanishingly few readers, to say "Hey, we're still here, busting a gut to bring you the news", even in the age of InfoWars and Twitter.

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Alex Jones, Infowars, and the new public sphere

Alex Jones is not a journalist. Free speech has limits and is rooted in reality, not theory. Technology companies have changed their tune. Laws - and perhaps regulators - will have to catch up. In the new public sphere, it is a few companies, not governments, who act as censors.

Through these fluid and arguable propositions the censoring of Infowars - an anti-establishment website founded and fronted by former radio personality Alex Jones - can begin to be understood. Let's take them in turn.

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High stakes for BBC over Sir Cliff appeal

Cliff Richard Image copyright PA

For the BBC, the decision whether to spend more money on this case is a difficult dilemma with high stakes.

There are many factors to consider.

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The issue with BBC Studios becoming commercial

Image caption Tony Hall says the BBC's current fixed income is "not sustainable"

The publication of this report shows the perennial difficulty of reporting any financial year, and the disadvantages of removing BBC Studios from the equation of salaries disclosed.

While there has been some progress in improving the overall balance of this list - on which my own name appears - the top of the list is still dominated by men.

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BBC cuts gender pay gap to 7.6%

BBC presenters including Mariella Frostrup (R), Kate Adie (C), Kate Silverton (C-L) and Naga Munchetty (L) Image copyright EPA
Image caption BBC presenters including Mariella Frostrup (R), Kate Adie (C), Kate Silverton (C-L) and Naga Munchetty (L) in January ahead of MPs hearing evidence about BBC pay

The BBC has reduced its median gender pay gap from 9.3% to 7.6%.

The corporation has also reduced its mean pay gap from 10.7% to 8.4%.

Read full article BBC cuts gender pay gap to 7.6%

Evening Standard to record £10m loss

George Osborne was a surprise appointment at Evening Standard, and initially said he would continue as an MP Image copyright PA
Image caption George Osborne was a surprise appointment at Evening Standard, and initially said he would continue as an MP

The Evening Standard will post a loss of £10m for the year ending in September 2017, a reversal in fortunes for London's paper that poses a big headache for its owner, Evgeny Lebedev.

The Standard's loss - £9.98m - comes after a recorded profit of £2.2m in the previous year, representing a £12m swing into the red.

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Gaming becomes the latest addiction

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Media captionMillions enjoy gaming but for a few it can lead to addiction, which has been recognised as a condition for the first time.

The World Health Organisation's classification of gaming disorder as a condition which is capable of debilitating addiction is an important moment in the shifting relationship between technology and society.

Concern among parents about the impact of smartphones in particular, and the response of technology firms to those concerns, has become a staple of the news agenda.

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The Mail's ferocious conservatism has re-shaped modern Britain

Paul Dacre Image copyright AFP/Getty Images

Sub-editors at the Mail might take against the cliché, but Paul Dacre was the last of his kind.

When he entered the profession in the early 1970s, British newspapers had a degree of influence that they do not have now.

Read full article The Mail's ferocious conservatism has re-shaped modern Britain

Peston's show moves to Wednesday nights

Robert Peston Image copyright Steve Meddle
Image caption Robert Peston

Robert Peston's Sunday morning political show on ITV, Peston on Sunday, is to move to Wednesday nights from September. It will be on air after the main evening bulletin, at around 22:35, and be renamed 'Peston'.

When Peston, ITV's political editor, was poached from the BBC in 2015, a key temptation was the offer of his own show.

Read full article Peston's show moves to Wednesday nights

Wright leaves The Wright Stuff

Matthew Wright always said to me that he would stop presenting The Wright Stuff when it stopped being fun. (I was the on-screen audience researcher from 2005-7).

Recently, it stopped being fun.

Image copyright Channel 5
Image caption Matthew Wright is to leave The Wright Stuff after 18 years

Read full article Wright leaves The Wright Stuff