Mapping Carillion's biggest construction projects

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image copyrightReuters

The collapse of construction giant Carillion has put thousands of jobs at risk on projects all over the country.

Work has ceased on Carillion's building sites while decisions are made over their future.

Carillion construction and infrastructure projects

This map shows some of the major projects on Carillion's books - including those already under way and other planned works.

About 40% of Carillion's revenue in 2016 was from construction projects both in the UK and overseas.

Most of the rest of the company's revenue came from public sector contracts, such as maintaining, cleaning and supplying meals for schools, prisons and hospitals.

The government has said this work will continue until new suppliers can be found.

Carillion was involved in a range of construction and infrastructure projects in the UK from new rail lines and electrification, to road widening and bypass schemes, as well as building two major new hospitals and a city centre redevelopment.

Below are some of the projects identified so far:

Road projects

Rail projects

image copyrightGetty Images
image captionCarillion had a contract to work on HS2
  • £1.4bn HS2 high speed railway line - Carillion had won the contract as part of a joint venture
  • East-West rail scheme, including a new Marylebone to Oxford via Bicester line
  • Electrification of the Paddington to Bristol line, Midlands main line, Shotts railway between Glasgow and Edinburgh and the Manchester-Preston railway
  • Carillion had also made a joint bid to build the South Wales Metro
  • The £75m Rotherham to Sheffield tram-train was already over budget and behind schedule.

Construction

image copyrightAFP
image captionOne of the biggest projects being blamed for Carillion's collapse is the £335m Royal Liverpool hospital

Power line

  • Carillion also laid a £38m power line between Canterbury and Richborough in Kent.

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