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Newspaper headlines: 'End of hibernation' as scientists urge caution

By BBC News
Staff

Published
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image captionPubs in England will be able to reopen from 4 July
"Cheers Boris," "Get the beers in" and "Summer's back on" are the headlines in the Daily Express, Metro and the Daily Mail as all three celebrate the easing of the lockdown in England.
The Express hopes the greater freedoms for people from next month will lead "to a brighter Britain" and provide some "much-needed cheer".
The Metro points out that the changes will allow the prime minister to get his hair cut.
The Mail's tone is cautious as it describes the easing of the lockdown as a "calculated gamble to head off economic disaster". 
The Guardian and the Times choose to highlight the health risk the government is taking by relaxing the 2m social distancing guidance.
The Guardian quotes Professor John Edmunds, an epidemiologist who advises No 10, as saying the new "one-metre plus" approach runs the risk of "allowing the epidemic to start to regain a foothold".
The Times reveals that Boris Johnson reportedly chose to opt for a more comprehensive reopening of the economy - despite concerns that if it goes wrong it will be harder to discern which changes restarted the epidemic. 
The Financial Times says ministers will now begin a campaign to persuade people that it is safe to go out again. The paper highlights a tweet from Chancellor Rishi Sunak, who told his followers that he could not wait to get back to the pub - even though he does not drink.
The FT's editorial says the easing of the lockdown is "a risky awakening" - the government is "walking a tightrope" because these changes must be accompanied by measures to prevent a resurgence of the infection. 
"Farcical," and "water joke" is the Sun's take on the decision to prioritise hairdressers, cinemas and bingo halls over schools, nail bars and swimming pools.
The Daily Telegraph's Camilla Tominey says that keeping nightclubs, gyms and water parks off limits is a demonstration of yet more confusion from the government - which is something she believes has come to characterise Downing Street's coronavirus briefings ever since the "stay home" message was dropped.
The Guardian reports on the "widespread consternation" among some sports that they have not been allowed to restart despite months of intensive planning.
The chief executive of PureGym, Humphrey Cobbold, has questioned the government's priorities - telling the paper "it is a strange war on obesity that sees pubs and restaurants open before gyms".
Swim England has also called on No 10 to reconsider. "Prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that it's safer to go into a pub than a pool and I'll shut up," is the message from its chief executive Jane Nickerson.
There is widespread criticism of the world number one in men's tennis, Novak Djokovic, after it was revealed he had tested positive for Covid-19.
image copyrightPA Media
image captionDjokovic, 33, said he was "deeply sorry our tournament has caused harm"
The Guardian says that his stock has "taken a pounding" after his Balkans exhibition tour allowed players to party in "stuffy Belgrade clubs" and ignore social distancing advice.
The Daily Mail's Mike Dickson says Djokovic has "trashed his brand", "battered his reputation" and for once, found himself up against an opponent he could not beat: scientific and medical reality.