Iceland's ancestry records give coronavirus clues
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Iceland's ancestry records give coronavirus clues

Iceland has a record of its people's ancestry going back 1,000 years, and therefore it has some idea of who shares genes.

Icelanders have also been donating blood to the company called Decode Genetics for years, which is deep frozen in a blood bank.

It has given the country an advantage into understanding the genetic makeup of coronavirus and how it affects people differently.

Additionally work done by Nextstrain.org which is tracking the virus around the world as it genetically mutates is providing a further understanding.

BBC Click talks to the director of Decode Genetics Kári Stefánsson and finds out more.

See more at Click's website and @BBCClick

  • 13 May 2020
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