Foreign fields

The hundreds of thousand of troops who died in the First and Second World Wars will be at the forefront of people's minds this weekend - but around 7,186 UK troops have died as a result of other conflicts since then. Here are some of them.

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Palestine (1945-48) 754 deaths

British forces suffered casualties during their involvement in Palestine, which Britain was entrusted by the League of Nations to administer in 1922. The bloodiest period was the run-up to Israel's independence.

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Malaya (1948-60) 1,442 deaths

The Malayan emergency followed the creation of the Federation of Malaya after WW2. British forces were used to suppress the uprising led by rebels of the largely Chinese Communist Party of Malaya.

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Korea (1950-54) 1,129 deaths

Britain responded to the UN's call after the North Korean Peoples' Army invaded the Republic of Korea. After initial successes, the North Koreans were beaten back despite help from China.

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Egypt (1951-54) 405 deaths

Britain's presence became increasingly unpopular after WW2. Anti-British demonstrations were followed by guerrilla warfare. British reprisals led to the burning of Cairo in 1952. British troops left in 1955.

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Cyprus (1955-59) 358 deaths

Cyprus became Britain's new location for its Middle East HQ after the withdrawal from Egypt. The guerilla movement, EOKAA, seeking a unified Cyprus under Greek rule, launched attacks against the British.

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Borneo (1962-66) 140 deaths

British forces were involved in what amounted to an undeclared war between Indonesia and Malaysia, the latter backed by the UK government. Indonesian nationalists backed rebels.

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South Arabia (1964-67) 160 deaths

An insurgency was mounted by two rival nationalist groups vying for control following Britain's promised departure from Aden. British forces withdrew, paving the way for the creation of Southern Yemen.

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Northern Ireland (1969-2007) 1,441 deaths

Tensions between Catholics and Protestants turned to violence, prompting the government to order troops on to the streets in 1969. Direct rule was imposed in 1972 as the violence escalated.

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Falkland Islands (1982) 237 deaths

Argentina's military rulers ordered troops to invade the South Atlantic islands on 2 April 1982. The UK sent a task force to eject them. Argentine forces surrendered on 14 June.

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Balkans (1992 to 2018) 72 deaths

UK troops were deployed as part of Nato's intervention in Bosnia and Herzegovina to secure peace during and after the Balkans War. The UK’s role included protection for humanitarian convoys.

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Afghanistan (2001-18) 456 deaths

Following the 11 September 2001 attacks, the UK joined US-led forces in the so-called “War on terror” - with al-Qaeda in Afghanistan as the main target. The UK later played a major role maintaining security and training Afghan forces.

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Iraq (2003-11) 178 deaths

US and UK forces launched their “shock and awe” bombardment of Baghdad in March 2003 to help to topple Saddam Hussein's regime. Iraqi forces resisted until 9 April. UK troops stayed on to maintain security and help train Iraqi forces.

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There have been many other conflicts and crises since 1945 which have resulted in UK troops losing their lives. These include: the Yangtze River incident (1949), Kenya (1952-60), Suez crisis (1956), Oman and Dhofar (1962-75), Gulf War I (1990-91) and Sierra Leone (2000). Fatality figures include those killed by hostile action and other causes.

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