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Wild Mountain Thyme: Is an Irish accent the hardest to master?

By Shane Harrison
BBC NI Dublin correspondent

Published
image copyrightAFP
image captionEmily Blunt plays the role of Rosemary Muldoon in the film

The trailer for the film Wild Mountain Thyme, starring Jamie Dornan and Emily Blunt, has prompted howls of derision for its Hollywood "Oirish" accents and clichéd paddy whackery.

The film, also starring Christopher Walken and Jon Hamm, is a romantic comedy set in rural Ireland.

It almost inevitably has a subplot about the inheritance of a farm.

Some critics say the actors rival Tom Cruise in Far And Away for worst Irish accent ever in a Hollywood film.

Jamie Dornan, who is from County Down, has been described as a Northern Irish man impersonating an American impersonating a southern Irish farmer.

Various commentators have been providing their take on the film's trailer.

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

The Dublin Airport Authority in a tweet says: "There's fashion police, Grammar police, we even have airport police.

"Is there such a thing as accent police? If so somebody better call 'em.

"On the upside, Ireland looks nice."

image captionJamie Dornan's accent has been lampooned as that of a Northern Irish man impersonating an American impersonating a southern Irish farmer

The pretty visuals also featured in a tongue-in-cheek tweet from the Irish embassy in Washington.

"To be fair, Irish accents are hard (we struggle with them at times).

"But otherwise Wild Mountain Thyme looks great.

"And Jamie Dornan and Emily Blunt present a remarkably realistic depiction, visually at least, of the average Irish man and woman.

"Truly, we are a beautiful people."

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

The trailer also provided comedian Dara Ó Briain with food for thought.

"For the record, I could only manage half of the Wild Mountain Thyme trailer.

"I have put the rest of it back in the fridge for later, where it will stay untouched until I eventually throw it out in a month."

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on Twitter

And the The National Leprechaun Museum of Ireland tweeted: "Even we think this is a bit much #WildMountainThyme".

The film is based on the play Outside Mullingar, by the Irish-American playwright John Patrick Shanley, and was filmed largely in County Mayo.

Although Wild Mountain Thyme is not yet on general release, that has not stopped people commenting based on the trailer.

Some have suggested it is the price people must pay for Irish-American Joe Biden's presidency, others that it is an offence to begorrah culture and the twin Irish gods of Guinness and potatoes.

Wild Mountain Thyme is due for release in the United States on 11 December, but in the meantime it has attracted a lot of publicity.

If, however, all publicity is good publicity it might yet result in many more than expected checking the film out to see if it's as bad as the accents suggest it might be.

Related Topics

  • Republic of Ireland

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