Carwyn Jones taken to hospital in 'severe pain'

First Minister Carwyn Jones [L] in his Cardiff Bay office with Prime Minister David Cameron in May First Minister Carwyn Jones [L] in his Cardiff Bay office with Prime Minister David Cameron in May

First Minister Carwyn Jones has been taken to hospital after suffering severe abdominal pain during a visit to north Wales.

Carwyn Jones went to Ysbyty Glan Clwyd in Bodelwyddan, Denbighshire, on Friday morning where tests were carried out.

He was given painkillers and told to rest.

The Bridgend AM, 43, cancelled the rest of his day's engagements but will continue with the rest of his visit over the weekend as planned.

His spokesperson said: "The first minister attended Ysbyty Glan Clwyd this morning, suffering from severe abdominal pain.

"Tests were carried out, he was prescribed painkillers and has subsequently been discharged.

Start Quote

He is looking forward to his next visit [to the hospital], which he hopes will be made in completely different circumstances and via prior arrangement!”

End Quote Carwyn Jones's spokesperson

"The first minister would like to thank the staff of Ysbyty Glan Clwyd for the wonderful care they gave him.

"This was his first visit to the hospital since becoming first minister.

"He is looking forward to his next visit, which he hopes will be made in completely different circumstances and via prior arrangement!"

Mr Jones, a former barrister, has been the AM for Bridgend since the assembly was created in 1999.

Following Rhodri Morgan's retirement, Mr Jones became Welsh Labour leader and first minister in December 2009.

  • When first minister, Mr Morgan was treated in hospital in July 2007 for two partially-blocked arteries. Two "stents", which are meshes or plastic tubes used to keep blood vessels open, were inserted in what was described as a "standard surgical procedure".

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