Antiques Roadshow

Antiques Roadshow returns for a new series and celebrates 40th anniversary

Interview with Judith Miller

I think the programme is a hit because it combines so many great things. It’s the stories, it’s the valuation, it’s the people, it’s their family connections - it’s not all just about money.Judith Miller
Date: 19.09.2017     Last updated: 19.09.2017 at 11.00

What has been your personal highlight from your time working on the show?

I think it would be four posters that I saw quite a few years ago for London Transport by an artist called Jean Dupas. The owner bought them for 50p in 1972 and I valued them at £40,000.

What would be your one tip to look out for as a future antique over the next 40 years?

Don’t look out for anything in particular - just buy something you really love. Don’t think of it as an investment. Just buy something that you’ll look forward to seeing when you wake up every morning.

What highlights can viewers look forward to when the new series returns?

If I told you, I’d have to kill you! But we do have some fantastic things coming up that we’ve already seen at one of our roadshows. I had a particular favourite in Kelso where I saw a Murano bird - but I can’t tell you any more!

Why do you think the programme continues to be such a big hit with viewers?

I think the programme is a hit because it combines so many great things. It’s the stories, it’s the valuation, it’s the people, it’s their family connections - it’s not all just about money. It’s about the stories that people have to tell you.

What would be your dream item for someone to bring along to a valuation day?

Something that I could genuinely say was owned and used by Bonnie Prince Charlie.