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Session 57

Sian explains the meanings of 4 phrasal verbs related to clothes and accessories in this English In A Minute.

Activity 1

4 phrasal verbs for clothes (and accessories)

Have you ever wanted to know phrasal verbs connected with clothes and accessories? Learn 4 of them with Sian in this English In A Minute.

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Sian

Hi! I'm going to share four great phrasal verbs about clothes.

Put on. This means 'place clothes on your body'.

Oh, it's sunny today - I'll put on my glasses.

Try on. We use try on when we 'put on clothes for a short time to see if they look good and if they're the right size'.

We often try on clothes or shoes in a shop before we buy them.

I'm just trying on this hat, but I think it's too small.

Our next phrasal verb is take off.

This is the opposite of put on. It means 'remove clothes'.
Oops! I forgot to take off my hat.

And finally, when you take off your clothes you can hang them up.

This means 'put them on a hook or a hanger'.

Hang your clothes up! Don't leave them on the floor.

One final thing to remember - these phrasal verbs can all be separated, so you can put your clothes on or put on your clothes.

4 phrasal verbs for clothes (and accessories)

Put on

Put on means 'place clothes on your body'. It is a separable phrasal verb.

  • I'm going to put on my coat as it's getting cold.
  • I'm going to put my coat on as it's getting cold.

Try on

We use try on when we 'put on clothes for a short time to see if they look good and if they're the right size'.

We often try on clothes or shoes in a shop before we buy them. It is a separable phrasal verb.

  • I'd like to try on a new coat as my old one is too small.
  • I'd like to try a new coat on as my old one is too small.

Take off

Take off is the opposite of put on. It means 'remove clothes'. It is a separable phrasal verb.

  • I'm not sure I like this one. I'm going to take the coat off.
  • I'm not sure I like this one. I'm going to take off the coat.

Hang something up

When you take off your clothes you can hang them up. This means 'put them on a hook or a hanger'. It is a separable phrasal verb.

  • This coat is really good quality. Make sure you take care of it and always hang your coat up.
  • This coat is really good quality. Make sure you take care of it and always hang up your coat.

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