The Christmas treats we need to make a comeback

Turkey. Sprouts. Roast potatoes. Christmas Tree Flavoured crisps. They’re all Christmas food classics. But wait, what was the last one again?

Yep, the latter was on the shelves of one supermarket chain last year, but it doesn’t seem to have stuck around for this festive season. Quite possibly because the feedback was, ahem, a little divided.

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The pine-flavoured potato snack joins the long list of novelty Christmas goodies that waltz into your life, make a big song and dance for a bit, then promptly leave, never to be seen again. If the festive snack was a relationship, it’d be someone you’d met on an app and thought might be ‘the one’, only for them to ghost you a few weeks later.

The good news is that each year brings another limited-edition treat to replace the memory of previous ‘delights’. For example, after making a big furore in 2015, the Chocolate and Cherry Sandwich debacle rarely gets a mention these days.

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Nor does ‘Brusselmole’...

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That’s because just a few years later we were too busy discussing Wensleydale cheese with bits of salted caramel and white chocolate in it to miss Christmas snacks gone by.

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White Chocolate Peppermint (candy cane) Pringles

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Described by Today.com as “like toothpaste on a chip”, these pringles arrived on American supermarket shelves in the build-up to the 2012 festive season. We were appalled and intrigued at the same time.

One thing we will say in their favour: candy canes are nice but can take an annoyingly long time to eat, so these could be a way to enjoy the taste while allowing you to get on with the rest of your day a few seconds later. That would have been good right?

Turkey and Gravy Soda

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No thanks, sounds horrible. But OK then, just a little. It’s Christmas after all and we want to know if this 2004 concoction from USA brand Jones’ Soda was as meaty as it suggested. If that flavour isn’t to your taste, in the same year they were selling Green Bean Casserole Soda and Mashed Potato and Butter Soda too.

Pyramint

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Strictly speaking this wasn’t a Christmas treat per-se, but like the chocolate orange, it was often found in a stocking or under the tree. A dark chocolate shell housed a mint fondant centre. When you think about the fact that the mint was essentially in a burial chamber, it feels like the pun and name came first and then they had to think of the snack to go with it.

Cadbury Snaps

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These were great. Like crisps, but chocolate. Flavours included hazelnut, mint and orange, and each one was as good as the next. Once again, not an actual Christmas-themed snack, but like cheese footballs and Twiglets, they were always popular at Christmas. As the noughties turned into the 2010s, they slowly started to disappear. We still miss them.

Jelly Fruit Slices

If you experienced Christmas in the UK during the ’80s and had a nan spend the day with you, she probably brought these with her. They weren’t like usual fruit jellies. They were a lot thinner and the ‘peel’ had a slightly thicker texture than the fruit. They came in orange and lemon flavours, and siblings around the nation would fight over the orange ones.

Coffee cream options in tubs of chocolate

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The year is 2019 and Christmas is upon us, and yet, AND YET, neither Quality Street nor Roses have a coffee-flavoured option. Devastated. It’s not the first time we’ve experienced this, but when Roses brought a version back under the name ‘Coffee Escape’ in 2013, we thought people had come to their senses. But no, it’s gone again. We just want to wake up and smell the coffee.

Toffee Deluxe

Quality Street faced a barrage of questions when, several years ago, they waved a fond farewell to the mainstay of their festive tub. Which is why it soon reappeared. Alas, it has now gone again. But could it return for a third time? It’s not looking good…

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Danish Butter Cookies (must be in a blue tin)

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You still find the odd tin here and there, but in the ’80s/’90s it wasn’t Christmas if there wasn’t a tin of these biscuits doing the rounds. Covered with big grains of sugar, each biscuit was contained within a little paper cupcake case, which was far bigger than the treat itself.

The tins have gone on to receive a cult following. With articles and memes investigating exactly why they always became homes for sewing kits.